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Maestro vs. Maistro


bdlngton

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I have been told by two different Mexicans in the last week that maestro is used for a teacher but the craftsman, like a bricklayer (nor a artisan who makes artesania,) is called a maistro. I had never heard that distinction before. Is that general usage in Mexico or just a Jalisco thing?

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Fomento Cultural Banamex put out several beautiful books on the Grandes Maestros de Mexico, Oaxaca and other places , it all about artisania, I doubt they would have used the word Maestros if there was such a thing as "maistros" for artisania.

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There is no such word as 'maistro'. There's only one word: maestro. Your sources are incorrect. See here:

Maestro is the correct spelling but many Mexican albañiles pronounce it maistro,my father in-law being one of them.Maybe it's a dipthong thing.
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Maestro is the correct spelling but many Mexican albañiles pronounce it maistro,my father in-law being one of them,it's a dipthong thing I think.

It's like the difference between pronunciations in different regions of the United States. Do you say yes, or do you drawl it to say yay-us? Do you say damn, or do you say day-um? Regardless of pronunciation, there's just one word for it.

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Fomento Cultural Banamex put out several beautiful books on the Grandes Maestros de Mexico, Oaxaca and other places , it all about artisania, I doubt they would have used the word Maestros if there was such a thing as "maistros" for artisania.

Reread my post and you will see that I said that "maestro" does not refer to artesanos.

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There is no such word as 'maistro'. There's only one word: maestro. Your sources are incorrect. See here:

http://www.wordreference.com/definicion/maestro

Then look up 'maistro'.

I did look these up before I posted my question. As I stated, I've always understood to encompass both meanings I described above but these people were specifically explaining to me the difference between "maestro" and "maistro," so whether :the latter exists in the dictionary in usage it does. I think cbviajero addressed exactly what I was writing. However I do not believe it is a diphthong thing because the the "ai" is a diphthong but the "ae" is not. According to my sources there definitely is a difference between the two.

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Fomento Cultural Banamex put out several beautiful books on the Grandes Maestros de Mexico, Oaxaca and other places , it all about artisania, I doubt they would have used the word Maestros if there was such a thing as "maistros" for artisania.

Interestingly it was Martin Ibarra's wife who first told me about the difference between "maestro" and "maistro." But her husband is definitely recognized as a maestro of artesania. I asked my maid and she confirmed that there is a difference. Both are, of course, native Spanish speakers, so whether the dictionary says so or not, these two ladies agree that there are two different words with two different meanings.

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Maestro is the correct spelling but many Mexican albañiles pronounce it maistro,my father in-law being one of them.Maybe it's a dipthong thing.

This is exactly what I was referring to. Actually Martin Ibarra's wife spelled it "maistro" for me to illustrate the difference. I would certainly think an abanil would know how to pronounce it referring to his profession.

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I don't mean to beat this into the ground, but please: you are trusting the education of maids and albañiles to teach you correct Spanish vocabulary? Common (but inaccurate) usage does not translate to an actual word in Spanish.

http://buscon.rae.es/drae/srv/search?type=3&val=maistro&val_aux=&origen=REDRAE

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If I had to chose between Fomento Cultural Banamex and Martin Ibarra´s wife on how to spell Maestro de artesania I would pick the Fomento , Martin´s wife is a wonderful lady but that does not make her an expert on Spanish spelling.

I have a couple of albañiles working at the house today and they call themself maistro but it is just a local way of speech not a different word.

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I have a couple of albañiles working at the house today and they call themself maistro but it is just a local way of speech not a different word.

Not exactly local,that's how it's pronounced throughout Mexico.
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In chiapas they the maetros of the albañil calls himself maestro so it is not true at least with him.

No doubt that there are exceptions,once while working as maestro de obras/general contractor in California one of my employees from Oaxaca who was learning English started calling me "master",that was kind of embarrassing. :)
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Old people have truly wonderful ways of expressing themselves. I have often heard "Cómo estás?" answered by, "Como Santa Elena..." or "Como San Efrén..." or "Sentado como San Ignacio..." Fabulous old ways of speaking! (If you are not familiar with these sayings, let me know...)

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If I had to chose between Fomento Cultural Banamex and Martin Ibarra´s wife on how to spell Maestro de artesania I would pick the Fomento , Martin´s wife is a wonderful lady but that does not make her an expert on Spanish spelling.

C but it is just a local way of speech not a different word.

While "maistro" may be derived from "maestro" and not found in a dictionary, it appears that Mexicans, at least locally, do distinguish between the two pronunciations of the word (although given their pronunciation they would not be spelled the same way) with a different meaning assigned to each pronunciation. My original question was NOT what the dictionary says. I have various dictionaries as well as access to look online. I did that before posting here. CBVIAJERO gave an answer that confirmed what I had been told about the different pronunciations, or "words," if you will, and their corresponding meanings. You, BMH, have also confirmed that here by your statement, "I have a couple of albañiles working at the house today and they call themself maistro . . . " I can only assume that More Liana has never encountered this variation on the word "maestro" and therefore has focused on the word as it appears in the dictionary and not on the variation that appears to exist also. I have no argument with what the dictionary says. However, I think it is interesting to know and understand that there are Mexicans using and distinguishing between "maestro" and "maistro." In fact, Martin Navarro Ibarra (nephew of Martin Ibarra) told me that he got in trouble at school as a child for addressing the teacher as "maistro," not "maestro." Thank you, everybody, for your input.

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Master has a nice ring to me :o By the way the answer you hear down there when you say ¿Como estas? is" Aqui estoy "so they are variations....

Reminds me of when I had a Mexican exchange student when I taught at an American high school. She called me "Teacher." That sounded funny to me. It's not how teachers are addressed in the US except by very young students, like in kindergarten. Yet when I taught in Colombia all of the students, other teachers, administrators, and parents called me "Profesora" or "Profe" often followed by my first name. Calling a teacher by his/her first name in a US school would be very rare and even considered inappropriate. By the way, in Colombia teachers at the secondary level (bachillerato) are called "profesores" and teachers at the elementary levels are called "maestros." I believe it's the reverse here.

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While "maistro" may be derived from "maestro" and not found in a dictionary, it appears that Mexicans, at least locally, do distinguish between the two pronunciations of the word (although given their pronunciation they would not be spelled the same way) with a different meaning assigned to each pronunciation. My original question was NOT what the dictionary says. I have various dictionaries as well as access to look online. I did that before posting here. CBVIAJERO gave an answer that confirmed what I had been told about the different pronunciations, or "words," if you will, and their corresponding meanings. You, BMH, have also confirmed that here by your statement, "I have a couple of albañiles working at the house today and they call themself maistro . . . " I can only assume that More Liana has never encountered this variation on the word "maestro" and therefore has focused on the word as it appears in the dictionary and not on the variation that appears to exist also. I have no argument with what the dictionary says. However, I think it is interesting to know and understand that there are Mexicans using and distinguishing between "maestro" and "maistro." In fact, Martin Navarro Ibarra (nephew of Martin Ibarra) told me that he got in trouble at school as a child for addressing the teacher as "maistro," not "maestro." Thank you, everybody, for your input.

You can assume those things about me, but you would be in error.

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According with the dictionary, there is only one word: maestro (teacher), also we use the same word as a qualification for some person that really knows how to do something, like the one that never fails answering in tennis, we say "wow he is a maestro". But, in Mx. we have "slang", so it is real common in most of this Country, to call "máistro" a mason that knows more than the simple mason (albañil), usually is the person that is in charge of the entire crew. Usually this men know almost the same as an architect but, they do not have the title, just the experience. And it is good to know for everyone all the words even if they are grammatically incorrect, but the words are real common for the every day conversations....:)

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