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best non addictive med for sleep


lakeside101
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On occasion, I will take 1/2 of one Tylenol PM, and it lets me fall back to sleep after waking up at 3 or 4am...I only do this about 3 times a month, so not worried about getting addicted or about the negative health effects. Sometimes I just NEED to get sleep and it really helps. No drowsiness the next day.

Not to worry...the diphenhydramine (Benedryl) that's in it isn't habituating.

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I have found that Simplex works nicely: http://www.medicamentos.com.mx/DocHTM/28722.htm

Helps me relax enough to fall asleep, but I don't wake up feeling groggy like so many other sleeping aids. You can get it at any farmacia, but Farmacia Guadalajara has the best price ($67 or so pesos for 60 tabletas)

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after looking up Gabapentina I wouldn't touch the stuff. This is a serious med...NOT a sleeping med.

"Gabapentin was originally approved in the U.S.. UU. by the FDA in 1994 as adjunctive medication to control partial seizures (still effective when added to other seizure medications). In 2002 we added an approval for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (neuropathic pain that follows shingles, other painful neuropathies, and nerve pain).

Although it is "right" (ie, approved by the FDA), has been the effectiveness of gabapentin in the prevention of neuropathic pain and frequent migraines nystagmus.

Gabapentin has also been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. However, this use "not indicated" is becoming more controversial. There are some statements about the actions of gabapentin as a mood stabilizer and has the advantage of having fewer side effects than medications against more conventional bipolar disorder as lithium and valproate. Some small and uncontrolled studies in the 1990s, most of them sponsored by the manufacturer of gabapentin, suggesting that this drug treatment of bipolar disorder would prometedor.De However, recently, several controlled studies, double-blind, found Gabapentin which was not more effective (and in one study, less effective) than a placebo. Despite scientific evidence that gabapentin is not optimal in the treatment of bipolar disorder, many psychiatrists continue prescribiéndola for this purpose.

Gabapentin has limited usefulness in the treatment of anxiety disorders such as social phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder, in treatment-resistant depression and insomnia. Gabapentin may be effective in reducing pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

It has also been helping patients with chronic postoperative pain (usually caused by nerves have been damaged accidentally qe in an operation, and when they regenerate, are reconnected incorrectly). In this case includes a tingling sensation near or around the area where the operation took place, and intense sharp pains, severe pain after a lot of movement, constant moderate pain that lasts all day and a general feeling of weakness. These symptoms can appear many months after an operation and therefore the condition can progress without being discovered.

Gabapentin is also prescribed to patients who are treated with anti-androgenic compounds to reduce the incidence and intensity of hot flashes following treatment.

Gabapentin administered orally is one of the two medications (the other is the flumazenil is administered intravenously) for consideration as part of the treatment protocol known as Promise for addictions to alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine. Gabapentin was given in doses of 1200 mg taken before bedtime for 40-60 days. Although the combination of infusions of flumazenil and gabapentin tablets is authorized treatment, there is no prohibition for an optional protocol prescribing gabapentin outside the Promise. There have been reports of meth addicts that gabapentin only administered at doses and times listed above have reduced withdrawal symptoms and almost eliminating anxiety and the desire to use methamphetamine (as of July 2007).

It is occasionally prescribed gabapentin for the treatment of idiopathic subjective tinnitus, but a randomized double-blind controlled found it ineffective."

Thank you, I was going to reply but you did an excellent job!
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Sex?

Excusez-moi .... Isn't that against the law ?? And addictive ??

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I like to try to get to the original source when attempting to get the benefits from something I ingest. There are sleep teas I bought at the grain store next to Gossips which has camomille, passion flower and other plant material that should relax you. Of course after you find it, brew it and strain it, you should be tired anyway (lol). If you take calcium, take it in the evening along with magnesium, maybe 500 mg. BTW, Ambien is made by Monsanto I read, beware!

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  • 5 years later...

have the same problem.  I have not seen sleeping pills here and did not get it in hospital.  I have had a doctor or two give me a benzo like klonipin .  As a former psych nurse, I am begging you not to let them give you a psych drug like quetiapine (seroquel), commonly given in small dose for sleep.  This kind of drug is dangerous.  Take the benzo

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38 minutes ago, Nettie said:

have the same problem.  I have not seen sleeping pills here and did not get it in hospital.  I have had a doctor or two give me a benzo like klonipin .  As a former psych nurse, I am begging you not to let them give you a psych drug like quetiapine (seroquel), commonly given in small dose for sleep.  This kind of drug is dangerous.  Take the benzo

https://www.healthline.com/health/addiction/addictive-prescription-drugs#central-nervous-system-cns-depressants

Clonazepam (Klonopin) and diazepam (Valium)

Clonazepam and diazepam are benzodiazepines. They’re used to treat anxiety and panic disorders. They’re also used to treat seizures. Clonazepam is commonly sold under the brand name Klonopin. Diazepam is commonly sold as Valium.

Like Xanax, these drugs are often misused for their sedative effects. They produce “highs” that can feel similar to the effects of alcohol. For example, they can cause feelings of drunkenness, talkativeness, and relaxation.

It’s not uncommon for people to recreationally misuse Xanax, Klonopin, or Valium in combination with other drugs. According to the CDC, the number of overdose deaths that involved both benzodiazepines and opioids more than quadrupled between 2002 and 2015.

Potential signs and symptoms of clonazepam or diazepam misuse may also include:

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On 9/8/2013 at 2:07 PM, phxfunguy said:

Not to worry...the diphenhydramine (Benedryl) that's in it isn't habituating.

 

Hooked on Benadryl: It’s Much More Than a Harmless Dependency

The concept may sound a little silly, especially when there are millions of people battling much more serious addictions. However Benadryl, or diphenhydramine, has been linked to serious mental complications when used in excess and for long periods of time.

Benadryl is an anticholinergic drug. Some people use it as an over-the-counter sleep aid, while others enjoy the sedative and euphoric effects it provides as a result of dopamine release. However, tolerance can develop in as little as few days, meaning you have to take more and more to achieve the same results. Sound familiar?

Thanks to Benadryl’s effects on the central nervous system, abuse and dependency becomes possible, though it’s much more common in those with a history of substance abuse.

https://drugabuse.com/hooked-on-benadryl-its-much-more-than-a-harmless-dependency/

 

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On 9/6/2013 at 5:39 PM, lakeside101 said:

melatonin has not worked in the past for me... what dosage??

Less is better...

According to the FDA, melatonin is a dietary supplement and not a regulated drug. Of course, this is why it’s available without a prescription and so popular. But this is where the problem begins: since melatonin is not regulated, you may not find sufficient or accurate information on the bottle about its strength and dosage. A study conducted by MIT in 2001 states that 0.3 milligrams of melatonin is sufficient to restore peaceful sleep in adults.

But in stores and pharmacies, you’ll even find 5 mg doses of the hormone.

https://nightly.co/melatonin-is-not-a-sleeping-pill-the-dark-side-of-the-popular-health-supplement/

 

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I too use Tasedan as described above. The US name for that same medicine is Estazolam. You will see that name written in smaller print on your Tasedan box immediately below the large print TASEDAN.

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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned CBD oil on this thread yet.  Most CBD oil is really just legal hemp seed oil, unless the label says otherwise.  Just 5 or 6 drops under the tongue can really relax you and allow you to acquire a deep and restful night of sleep with zero side effects and zero drugged or groggy feeling in the morning.  CBD oil has been widely covered on this board discussing its potential as a non-adicctive, safe medium to get a good nights sleep.  Forget about big pharma, thinking about the dangerous side effects of their drugs, alone, will keep you up all night with worry.  Just google CBD oil.

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