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I'm surprised nobody has mentioned CBD oil on this thread yet.  Most CBD oil is really just legal hemp seed oil, unless the label says otherwise.  Just 5 or 6 drops under the tongue can really relax y

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I take Melatonin, works for me and it's natural

Gabapentina. There is a 300 mg./tablet dose under the name of BaPex or a 400 mg./tablet dose under the name of Gabapentina available at Farmacia Guadalajara.

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Gabapentina. There is a 300 mg./tablet dose under the name of BaPex or a 400 mg./tablet dose under the name of Gabapentina available at Farmacia Guadalajara.

after looking up Gabapentina I wouldn't touch the stuff. This is a serious med...NOT a sleeping med.

"Gabapentin was originally approved in the U.S.. UU. by the FDA in 1994 as adjunctive medication to control partial seizures (still effective when added to other seizure medications). In 2002 we added an approval for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia (neuropathic pain that follows shingles, other painful neuropathies, and nerve pain).

Although it is "right" (ie, approved by the FDA), has been the effectiveness of gabapentin in the prevention of neuropathic pain and frequent migraines nystagmus.

Gabapentin has also been used in the treatment of bipolar disorder. However, this use "not indicated" is becoming more controversial. There are some statements about the actions of gabapentin as a mood stabilizer and has the advantage of having fewer side effects than medications against more conventional bipolar disorder as lithium and valproate. Some small and uncontrolled studies in the 1990s, most of them sponsored by the manufacturer of gabapentin, suggesting that this drug treatment of bipolar disorder would prometedor.De However, recently, several controlled studies, double-blind, found Gabapentin which was not more effective (and in one study, less effective) than a placebo. Despite scientific evidence that gabapentin is not optimal in the treatment of bipolar disorder, many psychiatrists continue prescribiéndola for this purpose.

Gabapentin has limited usefulness in the treatment of anxiety disorders such as social phobia and obsessive-compulsive disorder, in treatment-resistant depression and insomnia. Gabapentin may be effective in reducing pain and spasticity in multiple sclerosis.

It has also been helping patients with chronic postoperative pain (usually caused by nerves have been damaged accidentally qe in an operation, and when they regenerate, are reconnected incorrectly). In this case includes a tingling sensation near or around the area where the operation took place, and intense sharp pains, severe pain after a lot of movement, constant moderate pain that lasts all day and a general feeling of weakness. These symptoms can appear many months after an operation and therefore the condition can progress without being discovered.

Gabapentin is also prescribed to patients who are treated with anti-androgenic compounds to reduce the incidence and intensity of hot flashes following treatment.

Gabapentin administered orally is one of the two medications (the other is the flumazenil is administered intravenously) for consideration as part of the treatment protocol known as Promise for addictions to alcohol, cocaine and methamphetamine. Gabapentin was given in doses of 1200 mg taken before bedtime for 40-60 days. Although the combination of infusions of flumazenil and gabapentin tablets is authorized treatment, there is no prohibition for an optional protocol prescribing gabapentin outside the Promise. There have been reports of meth addicts that gabapentin only administered at doses and times listed above have reduced withdrawal symptoms and almost eliminating anxiety and the desire to use methamphetamine (as of July 2007).

It is occasionally prescribed gabapentin for the treatment of idiopathic subjective tinnitus, but a randomized double-blind controlled found it ineffective."

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Not sure there are any meds that couldn't foster dependency. The current research on sleep disorders pretty consistently reports that ETOH may help you zonk out, but you will awaken before you have cycled through the beneficial portion of sleep. If you do some online reading on sleep disorders, you may get some ideas about the sort of lifestyle/environment/age factors that affect sleep and some ideas about changes you might try to see if the problem can be solved on your own. However, sleep apnea episodes can cause frequent awakenings and that definitely needs medical intervention. The sleep disorder issue was discussed on one of the boards and I think some physicians in GDL were mentioned. Not sure which board, so will have to do some backtracking.

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Let's face it. Insomnia is a problem for folks over 65. I used to sleep like a log but I worked sometimes 13 hours a day 6 days a week (I'm a nurse who made lots of overtime). Now that I'm retired I'm just not as exhausted as I was and I do have trouble getting a good night's sleep. Most of my friends are experiencing the same trouble. I try to stay up and watch some TV or read in another room and then go to bed when I feel sleepy. Hey, I'm retired! What do I need a schedule for :P? I schedule activities for after 11 am.

If I wake up at night and cannot fall asleep after 15 minutes I get up and read or do something I had planned on doing the next morning. That usually makes me tired and I go back to sleep within an hour--and I feel that it wasn't a wasted hour turning and tossing in bed. If I sleep later because of that I still usually get a total of 7 to 8 hours. Medicine? I avoid that. I administered enough of that stuff in my life. I only take any medication if I absolutely must. Sleep medicine is something I never touch--it would take too much money out of my monthly budget if I got to the point that I had to use it.

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I've used Ambien/zolpidem occasionally, but what I've found that works even better for me AND is dirt cheap is difenhidramina -- the generic equivalent of Nytol. It's an antihistamine, available without prescription. Also helps to just clear the mind and count backwards from 100...just concentrate on the numbers...99..98..I'm getting sleepy...yawn

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I've used Ambien/zolpidem occasionally, but what I've found that works even better for me AND is dirt cheap is difenhidramina -- the generic equivalent of Nytol. It's an antihistamine, available without prescription. Also helps to just clear the mind and count backwards from 100...just concentrate on the numbers...99..98..I'm getting sleepy...yawn

Yes, the occasional Difenhidramina (Vicnite in another generic brand.... 12 pesos for 20 tablets) does it for me too and I feel fine the next day.

I took Ambien, not so long ago on the nightbus to Puebla....half an hour before leaving,.... started working on the laptop when we left and the next thing I know I am in Puebla. No idea how I put my laptop back in my bag and could not even tell who was sitting around me.... completely KO, gone.... wow.

Rony

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Agree with the 2 previous posts - Diphenhydramine / Dimenhydrinate.

It is also the main active ingredient in Dramamine (Gravol in Canada) for motion sickness as well as being a antihistamine, although the motion sickness drugs have a secondary component to slightly counteract the drowsiness, so if you want the stronger effect go with the straight Diphenhydramine.

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Search this board for "sleep" and you will find the contact information for a sleep clinic in GDL and also some suggestions from a physician who is familiar with sleep disorders.

Searched this board but couldn't find the sleep clinic in GDL or the physician mentioned. Could you send me the link?
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last night used the Kindle's Text to speech on a book and just let it play... very monotone....

no sleep timer effect... but fell asleep without pills.... for 4 hours!! woke up with it still playing.

turned it off... wasn't able to fall back to sleep, so turned it back on and fell back to sleep.... eventually battery ran out, but got about 5 hours.

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There's an herbal/homeopathic formula called Vivinox that has worked well for me. It's available at local farmacias in a small box. If it works for you, you can buy it much cheaper in a large box at Costco.

Yes, Vivinox-N is mildly tranquilizing and sedative.

Anyone here ever taken Zapex? http://www.sunpharma.com.mx/tecnicas/tec_zapex.asp I'm surprised that it's sold without a prescription.

A tea of Tila leaves is also gently sedative. Our vecinos make tea from fresh basil leaves to help them sleep. I haven't tried it.

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