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What does this mean in English?


k2tog

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Before we move on to More LIana's new one, and since we want more participation in this forum and don't want to get too clique-ish (sp) we should at least answer the open question.

Here's my understanding of: Se me Chispoteó. I hope I have it right, and that cbviajero or More Liana or anyone else will confirm or clarify.

"El Chavo del Ocho" - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/El_Chavo_del_Ocho - was/is a wildly popular television show in Mexico, and was exported to many countries. A phenomenon by any measure. It was a situation comedy wherein adult actors played a rag-tag group of neighborhood children, with the various adult characters also there to play against. The main character, "El Chavo", was always messing things up and/or saying the wrong thing at the wrong time, and he coined the above phrase. When he would screw up or say something he shouldn't have, he would respond to the situation with:

Se me chispoteó.

It was his way of saying, "I screwed up....or....it just slipped out." And there's definitely a strong note of begging forgiveness in it.

(Also, to my knowledge, chispotear isn't even a "real" word.)

Is that accurate?

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Teporocheros!

I had to ask my wife..

I realized a long time ago that I would never be a hundred percent fluent in Spanish,there's just too many words to learn, but it's fun learning new ones on a daily basis.

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Before we move on to More LIana's new one, and since we want more participation in this forum and don't want to get too clique-ish (sp) we should at least answer the open question.

Se me chispoteó.

It was his way of saying, "I screwed up....or....it just slipped out."

Is that accurate?

I think"it just slipped out" is the correct translation.

And I agree with you that we want more participation in this forum and any question about learning Spanish is welcome.

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Thanks cbviajero! But I'm still staring at More Liana's word, los teporocheros, with crossed eyes. I have a class tomorrow...

For sure, "I screwed up" in colloquial Mexican Spanish would be highly useful to me on a regular basis. Looking forward to it.

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Regarla.

La regamos. We screwed up.

I was hoping you'd chime in, ALL DAY,that's the one I use,there's also-meti la pata,me equivoque and the vulgar-cage el palo.
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Argh! I knew regarla and, once again, had forgotten it. What can I say....la regué de nuevo. I really need to review my notes, and use them (or lose them). Thanks for reminding me of it. I also figured there had to be other more colorful and vulgar versions. Surprised there isn't one using ching...

Is Teporocheros another word for drunks? If so...

"Cuando vi a los teporocheros, di vuelta y fui corriendo!" - When I saw the drunks, I turned and ran.

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Argh! I knew regarla and, once again, had forgotten it. What can I say....la regué de nuevo. I really need to review my notes, and use them (or lose them). Thanks for reminding me of it. I also figured there had to be other more colorful and vulgar versions. Surprised there isn't one using ching...

Is Teporocheros another word for drunks? If so...

"Cuando vi a los teporocheros, di vuelta y fui corriendo!" - When I saw the drunks, I turned and ran.

Yep, well done. It's very specific, extremely colloquial DF slang. Did you find out the origin of the word?

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Nope. I only shortened it to the adjective, and found teporocho on Spanishdict.com. What's the derivation?

Back in the way-back, there used to be places where broke all-night drinkers could stagger in to buy all-you-could-drink tea for eight centavos. Hence, té por ocho--y teporocheros, the ones who took advantage of it.

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I noticed immediately since no self-respecting all-night drinker would squander 8 pesos on té. :lol:

Okay, here's one that I'm told is very common (and entirely useful).

Dar gato por liebre

When you go to a butcher who sells liebre, note that the feet are always intact, fur and all. The ears are missing and other than the feet, the animal has been skinned. Without feet, it would be difficult to tell if you were getting gato por liebre, as their bone structures are all but identical.

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Well, it looks like I broke this thread again.

Dar gato por liebre - to give cat for (instead of) hare.....is to be cheated/swindled

My explanation wasn't enough? OK...I knew you knew, and I simply gave the reason for the saying. I was hesitant to be the one to answer, tried to give someone else a chance. Sorry.

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Dar gato por liebre - to give cat for (instead of) hare.....is to deceive/cheat/swindle

Es cuando te quieren ver la cara de (......)you fill in the blank..
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