Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

What does this mean in English?


k2tog

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 175
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Many long years ago, I was stopped, the van was searched, and finally the policeman said, "Pues deme algo para los chescos." I told him there were chescos in the cooler between the front seats and he could have whatever he wanted. He rolled his eyes and made me move along. Chescos indeed.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Veinte pesos?That's gotta be the cheapest mordida I've ever heard of,bien hecho!

Mordida?...just a little cooperación, that's all.

We were lucky. Partner was driving the wrong way down a one-way street in Chapala. It was only one block and a super wide street. (Honestly, it's wider than the carretera here!) Got to the corner, and there's the officer already working with two other previously stopped clients when he spotted us and motioned to pull over. Since we were third in line, and had to wait our turn, I guess by the time he got to us he'd already been sated. Of course he tried to go fishing, but I was (truthfully) going to La Recaudadora the very next day for another matter, so the ticket was no big deal to me. (EDIT FOR CLARITY: He balked.)

During his last ditch pitch, he kept repeating "soda"..."soda"...

The dude was a cupcake. :lol:

So for anyone wondering, I take the original - "No mas saca para el chesco." - to mean: "Nothing more than enough for a soda". Or something like that. Chesco is short for refresco. Kind of like chela means beer.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you saying you gave him a 20 peso tip after he gave you the ticket?No manches!!

Lo del chesco es para que no te de el folio!!

Con razon nos quieron ver la cara..

Link to post
Share on other sites

Are you saying you gave him a 20 peso tip after he gave you the ticket?No manches!!

No, no. (I just re-read what I wrote and see how it might have been confusing. Then added an 'EDIT".)

Only the two coins. No multa.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No worries. I help out with an English class and one of the students in it is a little old lady from Guadalajara. Anyway, I was telling the story in class as an example of slang, and when she heard me say I only paid 20 pesos, she called me "codo". Jajajajaja. (For anyone who doesn't know, codo = cheap)

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 5 weeks later...

I hadn't heard the "naranjas" extension (I assume that's what it is, an extension of the same play?).

Yes. I put these two silly ones in the same post as examples of how a lot of Mexicans play with words and sounds. (A little bit of nonsense just for fun, something like how people from the US would say "See you later, alligator.")

If I understand correctly, Iguanas ranas is a play on Igualmente. And No hay de queso... is a play on No hay de que....another way to say de nada or por nada.

Do I have it right?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I hadn't heard the "naranjas" extension (I assume that's what it is, an extension of the same play?).

Yes. I put these two silly ones in the same post as examples of how a lot of Mexicans play with words and sounds. (A little bit of nonsense just for fun, something like how people from the US would say "See you later, alligator.")

If I understand correctly, Iguanas ranas is a play on Igualmente. And No hay de queso... is a play on No hay de que....another way to say de nada or por nada.

Do I have it right?

Sip.

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 3 months later...

^^Exactly. I heard it while someone was describing the party after a wedding, and took it to mean: To spend extravagantly/lavishly (and likely beyond your means?) for a party/event.

For anyone who can't read it, the literal translation is "to throw the house through the window / out the window". It's such a spectacularly visual metaphor.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Okay, well, since nobody else is offering anything up. El miedo no anda en burro. Obviously, the slowness of a burro has something to do with it, so here's what I want it to mean since it would make sense to me. Fear spreads quickly, sort of like how we might say, fear spreads like a wildfire. But I have a strong feeling there's more to it than that.

Link to post
Share on other sites

^^Exactly. I heard it while someone was describing the party after a wedding, and took it to mean: To spend extravagantly/lavishly (and likely beyond your means?) for a party/event.

For anyone who can't read it, the literal translation is "to throw the house through the window / out the window". It's such a spectacularly visual metaphor.

That's exactly what it means.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.


×
×
  • Create New...