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What does this mean in English?


k2tog

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that it is dying slowly....:(

when a person is dying hanging....before the death, he still moves his legs in a weakly way...

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The English translation is a very common phrase, and nobody has come up with it yet.

Whatcha want, All Day? "Knocking on death's door?"

(I love doing this stuff and comparing notes with my spectacularly talented Spanish Teacher who doesn't speak much English.)

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Loosely translated it means " wasting your time or effort"at least that's the way I've heard it used.

Sorry cbviajero, I skipped over your post. That's it exactly and it's somewhat like the English phrase ''Beating a dead horse''.

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One of my favorite dichos/ refranes is "Arrieros somos y en el camino andamos"which depending on the context can have two very different meanings.

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Now I'm confused. So which one is it?

Does "Sigue dando patadas de ahorcado"....mean "dying slowly.....clinging to life....still kicking", or does it mean to "waste one's time or effort....stubbornly continuing to do something despite it being futile"???

Or can it mean both? I can easily imagine it could be used both ways, depending upon the context of the conversation.

And.....cbviajero, I can't even guess what "Arrieros somos y en el camino andamos" means. But I bet it's interesting.

My friend taught me a great one this morning, but I don't want to further confuse the thread so I'll save it for another time.

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Now I'm confused. So which one is it?

stubbornly continuing to do something despite it being futile"???

That's the one!
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Thanks, cbviajero.

Okay, give us a hint about "Arrieros somos y en el camino andamos".

Does this have anything to do with feeling like you're "just another mule, day in and day out"? I (sort of) remember a dicho that expresses that idea, but if I recall the phrasing was totally different. There are so many...

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Thanks, cbviajero.

Okay, give us a hint about "Arrieros somos y en el camino andamos".

Does this have anything to do with feeling like you're "just another mule, day in and day out"? I (sort of) remember a dicho that expresses that idea, but if I recall the phrasing was totally different. There are so many...

Hey Travis, not cbviajero, but I'll chime in. There's actually a beautiful song written by Cuco Sánchez called ''Arrieros Somos'' that has both of the two sentiments that cbviajero was talking about. It has the sense of fate that we are all just a bunch of mule drivers passing through life, and it also has the other sense of revenge that the dicho is noted for. Here are the lyrics:

Arrieros somos y en el camino andamos

Y cada quien tendrá su merecido

Ya lo verás que al fin de tu camino

Renegarás hasta de haber nacido

Si todo el mundo salimos de la nada

Y a la nada por Dios que volveremos

Me rio del mundo que al fin ni él es eterno

Por esta vida nomás nomás pasamos

Tú me pediste amor y yo te quise

Tú me pediste mi vida y te la di

Si al fin de cuentas te vas, pues anda vete

Que la tristeza te lleve igual que a mí

Arrieros somos y en el camino andamos

And here's the song as sung by Cuco Sánchez:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpyGLA75_Ck

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All Day nailed it,jrod too.The first time I heard it I was thanking a farmer for helping me get my truck unstuck and that was his reply after I had thanked him.

There's a small paperback titled Dichos,Dicharachos y Refranes Mexicanos that I enjoyed,I bought mine at a Soriana.

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Funny in French we have a similar expression , we say" he is thrashing about like a hangman.",

Like a hangman (the executioner) or like a hanged man (the...well, you know).

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Okay, this thread is too fun to let die. My Spanish teacher told me he's also heard "Sigue dando patadas de ahogado"....a drowned person who continues to kick in futility.

Here's one my friend taught me just yesterday. Not a dicho, but a way of describing someone. I love this one because it makes me laugh. (So it's easy to remember!)

"Se siente como la ultima chela en el estadio."

There's another very similar way to express it, but this is the version I prefer.

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