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Residente Permanente, What rights does it Really give us?


Jim Bowie

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Sunshine Girl said that Americans born in the US can be deported.

Maybe possible.

Canada is in the process of deporting someone born there. The father was a foreign diplomat so the son can be deported.

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Some people cannot be naturalized without losing their citizenship. it depends on their mother country not on the country that is naturalizing them: ie. Ivory coast citizens so if they are to be deported they become people without a country, pretty tough situation to be in.

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The price you pay for "greener pastures". :) Don't see too many US citizens renouncing their citizenship, even when they claim that Mexico is their country now . :)

The U.S. allows U.S./Mexican dual citizenship.

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Are you not aware that naturalized Americans can also be deported, in fact even Americans born in the USA can be deported if found to be engaged in activities contrary to "American interest"???

A person born within the sovereignty of the U.S. is a U.S. citizen, except if he is born to diplomats of a foreign country, and cannot be deported from the U.S. no matter what the crime. It is impossible.

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If Mexico doesn't require that you renounce your U.S.citizenship in order to become a Mexican citizen and vice versa is also true, WHO are you lying to?

Just for the grins, consider that most politicians, everywhere, serve at least two masters, don't they?

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Maybe ignores others is the better term. You missed the point. Hard to serve 2 masters. You must lie to one, or both. :(

How is a dual citizen serving two masters? When in the U.S. the person is a U.S. citizen and cannot use the resources of the Mexican Consulate.

In Mexico the person is a Mexican citizen as soon as he crosses the border and cannot use a U.S. Consulate.

The U.S., and I assume Mexico also, only allow dual citizenships with friendly countries. I do assume if a war breaks out between the two countries that the dual citizen could be conscripted into service in the country he is in at the time.

Otherwise I don't know how anyone is serving two masters between the U.S. and Mexico. The tax laws are the same for expats as they are for dual citizens.

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How is a dual citizen serving two masters? When in the U.S. the person is a U.S. citizen and cannot use the resources of the Mexican Consulate.

In Mexico the person is a Mexican citizen as soon as he crosses the border and cannot use a U.S. Consulate.

The U.S., and I assume Mexico also, only allow dual citizenships with friendly countries. I do assume if a war breaks out between the two countries that the dual citizen could be conscripted into service in the country he is in at the time.

Otherwise I don't know how anyone is serving two masters between the U.S. and Mexico. The tax laws are the same for expats as they are for dual citizens.

The big story a couple of months ago about the school teacher, Mexican National, US naturalized citizen. arrested in Sonora for drugs under her bus seat was treated like a US citizen and assisted by the US consular general and Arizona state senate to help release her. So much for that theory.

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The dual citizenship comes in when there is a draft or a war then you usually have to chose a master if you are of an age to serve the country..

The draft hasn´t happened since 1973 and I doubt it will ever again.

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The big story a couple of months ago about the school teacher, Mexican National, US naturalized citizen. arrested in Sonora for drugs under her bus seat was treated like a US citizen and assisted by the US consular general and Arizona state senate to help release her. So much for that theory.

I read that and I don't understand it if it is true except that maybe all the publicity about her being an American citizen caused the consulate to jump in and assist which was easier than trying to explain why it wasn't supposed to be involved with a dual citizenship to the public.

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The draft hasn´t happened since 1973 and I doubt it will ever again.

Not really. I knew a Dallas police office who told me he didn't qualify for the GI Bill after WWII because when the war broke out, he was visiting relatives in Germany and was drafted into the German Army. He was placed in an office position but since he fought on the wrong side he had to pay his own college tuition. He wasn't a German citizen but that didn't make any difference.

The U.S. has drafted foreigners, non U.S. citizens, to fight in many wars.

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I read that and I don't understand it if it is true except that maybe all the publicity about her being an American citizen caused the consulate to jump in and assist which was easier than trying to explain why it wasn't supposed to be involved with a dual citizenship to the public.

OR it could be when drugs and Mexico are mentioned in the same sentence all else goes to the wayside and the US steps in to play the hero?

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I read that and I don't understand it if it is true except that maybe all the publicity about her being an American citizen caused the consulate to jump in and assist which was easier than trying to explain why it wasn't supposed to be involved with a dual citizenship to the public.

Another possibility is there is no law/rule stating the US Consulate General cannot be involved in foreign affairs in other counties when it is a naturalized citizen. This might be a rumor.

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Another possibility is there is no law/rule stating the US Consulate General cannot be involved in foreign affairs in other counties when it is a naturalized citizen. This might be a rumor.

For what it's worth, I know of at least 6 Naturalized American Citizens(born in Mexico) that enter Mexico every time as US Citizens, when they come to Chapala. So, Mexico would have no way of knowing they were also Mexican. Some speak very poor Spanish.

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Back to the original question - Can RP's work for compensation? Under an older law, it was forbidden for retirees down here to work. Can some definitively give an answer? Thanks.

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Back to the original question - Can RP's work for compensation? Under an older law, it was forbidden for retirees down here to work. Can some definitively give an answer? Thanks.

Yes.

http://webcache.googleusercontent.com/search?q=cache:G5yqN1jKLMIJ:www.inm.gob.mx/static/Tramites_LM/Estancia_LM/Matriz_de_Equiparacion_V2.xlsx+Equiparacion+de+calidades+y+caracteristicas&cd=1&hl=es-419&ct=clnk&gl=mx

Click on: "Abra este contenido en una nueva ventana"

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Under the old law, retirees could work if they applied for, and were granted that right on their visas, FM2 or FM3, as Lucrativa status.

Many have worked in lucrativa status for many years. Now, if you have Residente Permanente status, you may work. This solves the grey area of volunteers, who work without pay, being in technical violation. INM once admonished me for teaching and I quickly quit that position. All lead volunteers were required to be in Lucrativa status, as were any who handled money, etc. It got complicated under the old rules.

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Under the old law, retirees could work if they applied for, and were granted that right on their visas, FM2 or FM3, as Lucrativa status.

Many have worked in lucrativa status for many years. Now, if you have Residente Permanente status, you may work. This solves the grey area of volunteers, who work without pay, being in technical violation. INM once admonished me for teaching and I quickly quit that position. All lead volunteers were required to be in Lucrativa status, as were any who handled money, etc. It got complicated under the old rules.

Are you saying that volunteers who have obtained Permanente status can then volunteer with no problem? Is there any reporting required?

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