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Residente Permanente, What rights does it Really give us?


Jim Bowie

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I wonder if there are those that REALLY KNOW what we get and DO NOT GET when we become RP? My take is that we can't vote, hold office, can't criticize the government, and can't participate in political activities, such as rallies, etc. I could be wrong on these things, but I would REALLY like to know what "privileges" we are getting. And, what rights we are Not Getting. Reliable and knowledgeable help would be appreciated. Speculation will not help. Your source would help immensely. Thanks.

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With Residente Permanente, you can enter and exit the country without restriction, work, and not have to renew visas on an annual basis. You only have to notify INM if you move or change relationship status.

Younger folks may want to proceed to naturalization and gain the vote and ability to hold some offices, but not high offices or military rank.

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I think your assuming a joined up government policy.

It is still an evolving situation when the various department realize immigration has change their rules then they will change theirs. Department x will state you need visa y to get service xyz.

DIF, IMSS, SP, are a few that spring to mind.

Customs and traffic cops may just be the more entrepreneurial.

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I think your assuming a joined up government policy.

It is still an evolving situation when the various department realize immigration has change their rules then they will change theirs. Department x will state you need visa y to get service xyz.

DIF, IMSS, SP, are a few that spring to mind.

Customs and traffic cops may just be the more entrepreneurial.

This is simply not true.

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Guest bigd

One can become a citizen, contrary to what HookemHorns said.

If you became a full citizen could you then become mayor of chapala, could you join the Mexican army, could you become a polic officer like a natural born Mexican can do?

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First, the law regarding foreigners participating in Mexico's politics. The following are articles taken directly from the Mexican constitution:

Artículo 38.
Son extranjeros, los que no posean las calidades determinadas en el Artículo 35. Tienen derecho a las garantías que otorga el Capítulo I, Título Primero, de la presente Constitución; pero el Ejecutivo de la Unión tendrá la facultad exclusiva de hacer abandonar el territorio nacional, inmediatamente y sin necesidad de juicio previo, a todo extranjero cuya permanencia juzgue inconveniente. Los extranjeros no podrán de ninguna manera inmiscuirse en los asuntos políticos del país. (Highlighting mine.) We've been over this a million times on the forums. This is the citation of law saying that if you as a foreigner are believed to be 'inconvenient' in Mexico, you can be deported immediately and without prior judgment. It goes on to say that foreigners may in no way meddle or interfere in the politics of this country.

Now scroll down to

Article 42:

I. La nacionalidad mexicana por naturalización se perderá en los siguientes casos:

a). Por adquisición voluntaria de una nacionalidad extranjera, por hacerse pasar en cualquier instrumento público como extranjero, por usar un pasaporte extranjero, o por aceptar o usar títulos nobiliarios que impliquen sumisión a un Estado extranjero, y
b ). Por residir durante cinco años continuos en el extranjero.

Now the requirements for being president of Mexico:
Article 82:
Para ser Presidente se requiere:

I. Ser ciudadano mexicano por nacimiento, en pleno goce de sus derechos, hijo de padre o madre mexicanos por nacimiento y haber residido en el país al menos durante veinte años.
II. Tener al menos 35 años cumplidos al tiempo de la elección;

III. Haber residido en el país durante todo el año anterior al día de la elección. La ausencia del país hasta por treinta días, no interrumpe la residencia.
IV. No pertenecer al estado eclesiástico ni ser ministro de algún culto;
V. No estar en servicio activo, en caso de pertenecer al Ejército, seis meses antes del día de la elección.
VI. No haber ocupado ningún cargo público en el período inmediato anterior en los términos del Artículo 47. No ser secretario o subsecretario de Estado, jefe o secretario general de Departamento Administrativo, Procurador General de la República, ni Gobernador de algún Estado; y
VII. No estar comprendido en alguna de las causas de incapacidad establecidas en el Artículo 83.

The same requirement is true for any elected official: governor, representative, senator, etc: you must be a native-born Mexican citizen.

Now for the Army, Navy, Air Force, etc:
http://www.sedena.gob.mx/index.php/reclutamiento/requisitos-para-el-ingreso

Other than those cases, I believe that a any naturalized Mexican citizen has the same rights and duties as any native-born Mexican citizen.

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The argument gets pretty silly if you only rely on what you "think" is the case. More Liana's post appears extremely authoritative regarding this issue. You have every right of citizenship "except the right to hold high political office or military rank." In the US, naturalized citizens cannot become president (sorry Arnold). Green card holders in the US cannot vote, get a passport and they can be deported. The situation seems very similar here. Not sure I understand the problem.

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Inmigrado is a visa status obtained through INM (the Mexican immigration office) and has nothing to do with citizenship, which has to be requested and may be granted through the SRE--the Secretaría de Relaciones Exteriores. Your friend's visa status--Inmigrado--is essentially the same as the current visa called Residente Permanente. As a foreigner with a permit--albeit a permanent permit--to be in Mexico, he has no rights to vote OR to participate in politics (for example, in a protest of some sort). There are other rights he doesn't have: he can't buy property within the restricted zones unless using a fideicomiso (bank trust), he can't get a liquor license, and he can't own a brothel, among others.

In the past, the benefits you describe (IMSS, DIF, and some others) have been available to foreigners holding an FM-3 visa OR an FM-2 visa, as well as to foreigners having Inmigrado visa status. Common sense says that the same benefits as in the past are available to foreigners having Residente Temporal visa status, as well as those having the status of Residente Permanente.

Tourists coming to Mexico do not hold visas. The tourist CARD is called an FMM and is good for up to 180 days, at which point the FMM holder must leave the country.

As far as 'naturalized' Mexican citizens, the word "naturalized" is applied to any person whose application for Mexican citizenship has been accepted by the SRE. The document issued by the SRE that confers Mexican citizenship is called the Carta de Naturalización. It's a large-format, laminated and quite beautiful document. Mine is one of my most prized possessions. The carta has to be presented in any situation where a native-born Mexican citizen would produce a birth certificate: application for passport, voter registration, application for insurance, etc. The minute you have your carta, you can go apply for a passport. If you happen to have an INAPAM card, your passport will be half-price.

The same word--'naturalized'--is used in the USA to refer to naturalized American citizens--i.e., foreigners who have applied for and received American citizenship.

Whether you choose to apply for Mexican citizenship or not is a personal choice. Once you have the Residente Permanente visa, you are never required to renew it and are permitted to remain in the country (with unlimited right to come and go) until either YOU decide to leave permanently, until you die, or until you do something to get yourself deported. The NO RENEWALS is the biggie, in my opinion. If you want to participate in Mexico's politics or for some reason want to own a brothel, you'll need to apply to SRE for citizenship. You can guess which one of those I wanted to do.

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Madam More LIana?

Jajaja.

In two years, I think I'll be able to apply for citizenship. The only downside I can see is I'll have to ask people to stop introducing me as, "The Duke of...bla bla bla". A shame, as it's gangbusters at cocktail parties. Decisions, decisions.

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So, until you become a "naturalized" citizen, you are subject to deportation, and maybe, forever, depending on the situation. I'm thinking that RP gives a few rights more than a tourist: IMMS, DIF, etc. I have a friend that says he is a citizen. He is Emmigrado. But, I don't think he can vote, not sure if he can protest. After RP, is the next step for all to "naturalized" citizen, with most rights?

Are you not aware that naturalized Americans can also be deported, in fact even Americans born in the USA can be deported if found to be engaged in activities contrary to "American interest"???

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Permanent Residents are treated as Mexicans when they own part of domestic corporations (except certain highly regulated activities) and do not have to register nor file annual reports with the foreign investment division of the Secretary of Economy.

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Are you not aware that naturalized Americans can also be deported, in fact even Americans born in the USA can be deported if found to be engaged in activities contrary to "American interest"???

Where would Americans be deported to???

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A naturalized US citizen does not lose his/her citizenship in his/her country of birth. Neither does a naturalized Mexican citizen lose his or her US or Canadian citizenship. Other countries have other rules about holding dual citizenship; if you are originally from a country other than the US or Canada, it behooves you to make sure that becoming a Mexican citizen does not take away the citizenship of your country of origin.

The law allowing a naturalized US citizen to be stripped of citizenship was instituted in 2005.

I believe that the law provides that the former naturalized US citizen be returned to his/her country of origin.

Google 'Lionel Jean-Baptiste deportation' to read more about the attempted deportation of one naturalized US citizen.

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