Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Another Way To Nationalize Legally


Ajijic

Recommended Posts

Mudgirl I have no idea about ONAAPAFA. But on UCD they go on no waiting list and has nothing to do with nationalizing. Thousands of such plates though in Guanajuato alone. Some expats have older cars and as you noted maybe even non-NAFTA and they drive locally seldom venturing far. For them UCD works.

Now back to my original post. This are my wife's notes:

As a follow up I had another meeting today and will have a meeting late Wednesday with the head of the program for all of Guanajuato state. He will travel from Dolores Hidalgo to meet me.

At this time I discovered trailers and motor homes can not be processed locally but that applies to few.

I am also told it is possible to clear your vehicle from Aduana's computers and to get a refund if due. What has to be determined is the process for this aspect. I should know this answer after Wednesday's meeting.

The vehicle must be presented locally for photos and to verify VIN etc. However, for those from a distance I will be authorized to pick up your final title, factura and pedimento and courier these to you.

They are advising it is best you send me your make, model, year, VIN and I will get the exact price before you do anything more.

The whole process takes from 2 to 4 weeks.

I can assure you legal pedimento's, titles, facturas have all be received back.

Once you have these documents you can register your vehicle in any state.


Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 63
  • Created
  • Last Reply

More notes from my wife regarding Nationalizing your vehicle in San Miguel. People are coming from as far as Manzanillo to do this.

The first step is having you send me a scanned copy of your title. With that I will send to the people who actually do the process. They will get back to me usually within 3 business days with an exact cost. There will be no surprises. The range is approx 15,000 to 24,000 pesos total for a NAFTA made vehicle with a VIN starting with 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 and from 1983 to 2007. Late this year year, 2008 vehicles.

Once we have the cost we will go to the office where documents are submitted and photos taken of your vehicle. Also, they will check your vehicle has not been reported stolen. The fee for this is 100 pesos. At this point I will go to the bank and make the required payment and return with an official receipt.

In a month or less your title, factura, pedimento will arrive. I will be authorized to pick up these documents or you can. If you live farther away and wish, I can courier them to you.

I can assure you this is a legal program.

Once all your documents arrive you can go to Rentas, Plaza Real del Conde and register your vehicle and get your plates. I can assist with this as well.

Tomorrow is my meeting with the person responsible for this program in the state. As I obtain more information I will post or feel free to ask.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, has anyone actually done it to the point of putting plates on their car? Thanks.

Yes but not through my wife as she just got involved. She is the first to present cases requesting a deposit back and tomorrow we should have answers on how to do this. The previous pedimentos were to Mexicans who had "chocolates" and no car permits.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nationalizing 1983 to 2007 NAFTA Made Vehicle

My wife's notes following today's meeting:

The first step is having you send me a scanned copy of your title. With that I will send to the people who actually do the process. They will get back to me usually within 4 business days with an exact cost. There will be no surprises. The range is approx 15,000 to 24,000 pesos total for a NAFTA made vehicle with a VIN starting with 1, 2, 3, 4 or 5 and from 1983 to 2007. In November this year 2008 vehicles can be nationalized.

Once we have the cost I will come to your house take photos of your vehicle (or if you are not local please send me the photos). You do not have to drive.

Photos include: side view, driver's door jam which shows VIN etc, and the VIN taken up close usually at bottom of windshield on driver's side (taken from outside car and blocking sun so it shows up clearly. We can also nationalize trailers with cars.

I also require a copy of owner's government issued ID such as your visa or passport; title again and utility bill. If you are not local, these can be scanned and emailed.

In addition, I require the amounts due. This can be cash or deposited into a bank account. Receipts will be issued and given to you or scanned and emailed to you. The first receipt is from an Aduana bank account; the second is for the registered approved broker at the border.

In less than a month your pedimento, factura and title will arrive in SMA. I will deliver or courier these to you. You then are required to obtain plates.

This process has been done several times here. My contact worked for Aduana for many years and this program is government approved and legal.

We can not get back your deposit nor remove your car from Aduana's records. Doing so requires a trip to the border. large deposits started in June 2011. If your car entered on an old passport it is likely your vehicle can not be found in Aduana's records. Cars generally are tied to passports. That is why many were able to obtain a car permit prior to ever entering Mexico.

Link to post
Share on other sites

More of my wife's notes are below. The fees are about 10000 p less than the airport but takes a little longer. Meanwhile, you do not have to leave your home.

Please know I am working through UCD and for this area they have asked me to be their sole representative in nationalizing expat vehicles. If you go their office they will direct you to me and give you my business card.

The actual nationalizing is done through a legal broker at the border and UCD has been given approval by the Governor of Guanajuato state as has been done in several other states. What the Governor did not allow was the reduced rate UCD was seeking. His valid comments were many existing new car assembly and parts manufacturers are here in this state and several more facilities under construction. He did not want to jeopardize that relationship.

The UCD person I work with was previously employed by Aduana for many years in a senior position.

If, for some reason the process does not work all monies are refunded.

We now have 4 vehicles in progress.

Link to post
Share on other sites

So, does this mean that we can only get UCD plates and will be restricted from driving our vehicle freely throughout the country?

No, this is totally separate from UCD plates. This is full nationalization as one does at the border or through SS Auto or Guadalajara airport etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No, this is totally separate from UCD plates. This is full nationalization as one does at the border or through SS Auto or Guadalajara airport etc.

It is confusing to people who are not familiar with UCD plates. If I remember and understand correctly, once someone has UCD plates he can nationalize the UCD vehicle much cheaper than the regular nationalizing. Is that what you are describing?

Link to post
Share on other sites

It is confusing to people who are not familiar with UCD plates. If I remember and understand correctly, once someone has UCD plates he can nationalize the UCD vehicle much cheaper than the regular nationalizing. Is that what you are describing?

UCD was seeking that those with UCD plates could nationalize for much less. In Guanajuato state the governor would not approve a discounted program for reasons mentioned but did approve being able to nationalize any NAFTA vehicle even if not UCD plated. Rates vary but Aduana's rates are consistent no matter where one nationalizes. The variation is to do with the broker. At Guadalajara airport the broker is making at least 10000 p plus for himself.

So, simply consider UCD as being an association of campesinos who combine efforts to improve conditions and advocating for the working poor and farmers etc, buy seeds, farming, irrigation, home improvements, making less expensive foreign vehicles legal, government liaison / support for their causes, etc. UCD or similar organizations can be found in most states in Mexico. They now have a program allowing nationalization and as before a separate program for UCD plates for under $100 but with some limitations vs nationalizing.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a 1978 Chevy Camper Van. AAA in the US classifies it as a class C motor home. Can I nationalize something like that? Any information or help will be greatly appreciated.

Sorry we now have agreement as old as 1981. You may be able to do it as a classic as they are vehicles over 29 years old which is yours.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What exactly is UCD? I keep seeing these letters but have no idea what they mean. Thanks

UCD (La Unión Campesina Democrática)

UCD is an association of campesinos who combine efforts to improve conditions and advocating for the working poor and farmers etc, buy seeds, farming, irrigation, home improvements, making less expensive foreign vehicles legal, government liaison / support for their causes, etc. UCD or similar organizations can be found in most states in Mexico

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just do not understand why people want to take other channels to nationalize their vehicles. There might be easier ways but not legal unless it's done by an approved custom agent at the border.

Why do you think a UCD plate is illegal? As Ajijic has written many times thousands of people have UCD plates and have not been bothered. The problem is that UCD is not in Jalisco although people with UCD plates do drive in Jalisco.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Plates from a farmers union?

You might think it is odd but being odd does not make it illegal. If it was illegal then people who are not farmers would not be legally getting UCD plates.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are mixing up UCD plates for a vehicle not nationalized including non-NAFTA vehicles (about $80) and a totally separate process of nationalizing (for about $1700) through UCD as approved by the government and a process found in many states with UCD and similar organizations..

The nationalizing is done through a broker at the border. The process is similar to SS Auto for example. The vehicles do not leave your home. Three photos, copy of title, visa, utility bill all sent electronically to my wife. The first one we are told is done and waiting for documents to return via courier. We have 4 more in progress and another on Monday. Some of these we have started are in Manazanillo.

UCD is akin to a co-op in Canada. It is a very powerful organization with hundreds of thousands of members helping the poor with a lot of government influence.

Read all the posts to understand.

Tonys, based on your comment nationalizing at the Guadalajara airport is illegal. It has proven to be very legal albeit about 10,000 p more than what UCD offers. And, what we offer is a full refund if does not work.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are mixing up UCD plates for a vehicle not nationalized including non-NAFTA vehicles (about $80) and a totally separate process of nationalizing (for about $1700) through UCD as approved by the government and a process found in many states with UCD and similar organizations..

The nationalizing is done through a broker at the border. The process is similar to SS Auto for example. The vehicles do not leave your home. Three photos, copy of title, visa, utility bill all sent electronically to my wife. The first one we are told is done and waiting for documents to return via courier. We have 4 more in progress and another on Monday. Some of these we have started are in Manazanillo.

UCD is akin to a co-op in Canada. It is a very powerful organization with hundreds of thousands of members helping the poor with a lot of government influence.

Read all the posts to understand.

Tonys, based on your comment nationalizing at the Guadalajara airport is illegal. It has proven to be very legal albeit about 10,000 p more than what UCD offers. And, what we offer is a full refund if does not work.

The brokers at the airport work with the brokers at the border, They do it in "absentia". It's not the proper way to do it but apparently legal. I had talked to Marta Duenas at the airport but chose to go to the border.

Link to post
Share on other sites

You are mixing up UCD plates for a vehicle not nationalized including non-NAFTA vehicles (about $80) and a totally separate process of nationalizing (for about $1700) through UCD as approved by the government and a process found in many states with UCD and similar organizations..

The nationalizing is done through a broker at the border. The process is similar to SS Auto for example. The vehicles do not leave your home. Three photos, copy of title, visa, utility bill all sent electronically to my wife. The first one we are told is done and waiting for documents to return via courier. We have 4 more in progress and another on Monday. Some of these we have started are in Manazanillo.

UCD is akin to a co-op in Canada. It is a very powerful organization with hundreds of thousands of members helping the poor with a lot of government influence.

Read all the posts to understand.

Tonys, based on your comment nationalizing at the Guadalajara airport is illegal. It has proven to be very legal albeit about 10,000 p more than what UCD offers. And, what we offer is a full refund if does not work.

When you say $1700 you are saying pesos not USD or CD right?

Link to post
Share on other sites

Nationalizing through UCD is 19000 to 26000 pesos total. The process is very similar to the airport but considerably less. I believe all the organizations nationalizing from within Mexico vs the border are using a bonafide broker at the broker.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Ajijic, you have been writing about the UCD plates for sometime now, have you heard of anyone having his vehicle confiscated because of UCD plates?

JOCO, please do not believe all you read about the legality of UCD plates. Today, my mechanic in San Miguel, Victor Espinosa (044-415-15 18235) - who many expats rave about and who speaks perfect English told me the tale of a friend of his. Towards the end of the year his friend was pulled over because of his UCD plates by Hacienda. Now you've probably read that the Federales have an agreement with Aduana and are the only entity entitled to confiscate a car. Wrong. Hacienda drives around in unmarked vehicles with their flashing lights inside on the dash. When they went on a "blitz" not too long ago this chap was shopping at our Mega store and was told he had to pay a fine in the vicinity of $20,000 pesos. In addition to that his car was confiscated. He employed a lawyer and had the fine cancelled but Hacienda kept the car. Victor said Hacienda seized many others but if they were Mexican and not part of expat forums that's probably why we don't hear reports of the actual numbers.

I actually believed what was being promoted by a facilitator and her husband in San Miguel and went to get and pay $1200 pesos for a year's worth of licensing. I wouldn't dare put them on my car knowing this and count those pesos a loss but it could have been far greater. We also hear of a letter from the governor of Guanajuato being given to UCD plate holders that says the car can't be seized just because of UCD plates. I'm currently waiting for the official translation of that letter by a certified translator here but her preliminary notes indicate all is 'not as advertised' by this facilitator. So when I get it I'll share on Chapala.com and other forums so folks can draw their own conclusions.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I just do not understand why people want to take other channels to nationalize their vehicles. There might be easier ways but not legal unless it's done by an approved custom agent at the border.

Tonys, I do agree with you. Ajijic or "LovingMexico" on Mexconnect.com are telling people nationalizing through UCD is legal but won't disclose the UCD rep in Dolores Hildago or the border rep they're working with in this brand new venture, and I've given up asking so there's no way to authenticate it's an approved broker. It's also very curious that this UCD rep in Dolores will only work with his wife and that folks in San Miguel who wish to investigate on their own will only be given her business card we're told. A few of us are writing to UCD, our Mayor and others in the interests of transparency for others. If someone can find a link on the web that confirms UCD has actually received Federal approval to nationalize their cars a reward is being offered - lol, just kidding.

In the meantime, below I'm re-posting with the author's permission an account that appears yesterday on San Miguel's Civil List (a Yahoo Group). Like Yucalandia.com, there's nothing better than actual first hand accounts of people who have successfully nationalized their cars, and the process they went through. The post contains a list of Aduana's approved customs brokers which others will find useful.

"We recently moved to SMA from San Antonio, TX. While we were in Laredo waiting

for the customs broker to check our furniture and goods before crossing, we had

our car nationalized. Here is what we learned from Mexican Customs:

(1) Your car must have been manufactured by a NAFTA country: México, the U.S.,

or Canada. If you purchased your car in the U.S., for example, and it is a

foreign make but manufactured in the U.S., then your car qualifies.

(2) There are a number of places on both sides of the border as well as inside

México (i.e. a Farmers' Union, etc.) that offer to nationalize your car.

Beware! Not everyone is authorized to legally nationalize your car! Even Customs in

Querétaro is not authorized to do so.

(3) Here is the list of authorized customs agents in Nuevo Laredo that can

nationalize your car. You can get the process started before you go there by

scanning your title, photo of the VIN number on your car, etc. and depositing

the fee into the bank account of the agent. Not to worry about depositing money

into the account: you will have the electronic copy of the bank transaction to

verify your deposit.

A.A. (Agente Aduanal) Jesús Alberto Marina Delgado (956) 728-1134

A.A. José Guadalupe Bautista Montoya (956) 722-6476

A.A. Juan Hermilo Chávez Rodríguez (956) 753-8329

A.A. Francisco Román Partida Robledo (56) 727-2650

We worked with José Guadalupe Bautista Montoya. And he also speaks English.

(4) You will find out how much the cost is (dependent on the year and make of

your vehicle) by calling. The numbers listed above are Laredo, TX numbers. The

agent can also tell you exactly what to scan and email to him, how long it will

take, etc. so you can plan your trip and know how many nights (1,2, etc.) it

will take.

(5) If you opt to get "nationalization" with someone not authorized by the

government, you might get away with it. However, if you are stopped and the

document numbers are not legitimate numbers in the computer, then you will be

assessed a HEAVY fine and, most likely, will have your car taken away from you.

(6) For more information, you can visit the site of Customs of the Mexican

Federal Government:

http://www.aduanas.gob.mx

gmartin@...

You can also call the Association of Customs Agents:

(867) 719-4618

(867) 711-5800

(867) 711-7503

The above information is from a brochure given to us by the Mexican Consulate in

Laredo, TX.

Terri

Link to post
Share on other sites

"Now you've probably read that the Federales have an agreement with Aduana and are the only entity entitled to confiscate a car. Wrong. Hacienda drives around in unmarked vehicles with their flashing lights inside on the dash."

http://www.shcp.gob.mx/LASHCP/campanas_digitales/Paginas/que_es_el_sat.aspx

Hacienda [sHCP] is the secretaria that is responsible for SAT which is part of ADUANA so hacienda is ADUANA and is SAT and is all one secretaria, not separate.

So your conclusion is incorrect in regards to ADUANA and the Federal Police.

Of course we might think from your statement ADUANA cannot check vehicles before deciding to impound them or confiscate vehicles ONLY the Federal Police can "check" vehicle for legality but you have it wrong. ADUANA does stop and check vehicles and can do this. Using the word hacienda and ADUANA are synonymous in this case, not separate.

Also if the Federal Police impound a vehicle they have to contact ADUANA to do the paperwork to confíscate it, not the other way around as you indicate, or levies fines etc.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

×
×
  • Create New...