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Loss of TIP Deposit on FM3 Renewal


Ezzie

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Back in June 2011 when the new deposit system started I wrote that it was the first shoe to drop and that it signaled the "herding" of gringos to be milked, all they had to do was create the milking chutes and there you have it - sometimes I really hate it when I'm right.

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Back in June 2011 when the new deposit system started I wrote that it was the first shoe to drop and that it signaled the "herding" of gringos to be milked, all they had to do was create the milking chutes and there you have it - sometimes I really hate it when I'm right.

MOO!

:D

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We are working on your deposit recovery and many times aduana messes up, you notified on time so it is getting them the proof of that and having them refund the deposit. They have been maiing lots of errors lately, almost hoping nobody fights it, but we do, that is what is included in our fee.

Spencer, we all appreciate your fighter instinct in getting things straightened out for us.

But not all of us wish to spend our golden years getting jerked around by a foreign government. I wonder how many here will soon cry, "uncle!" and pack it in.

The scariest part is that if INM, Aduana, etc. have done this to us now, what will they dream up later and what more will we have to contend with???

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I'm glad you asked "what will they dream up" - from TOB http://www.milenio.com/cdb/doc/noticias2011/577409eff8ed0e4164086d202b09dfe6

Here's the first paragraph: Mexico City • The federal government intends to eliminate subsidies to electricity and water to "encourage an increase in the efficiency of both energy consumption and water" as one of the economic measures "with climate approach".

Translated that would mean instead of many of you paying $.17 per KWH USD, you would pay $.44 per KWH.

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The DAC rate is the unsubsidized rate isn't it? Aside from the obvious question of how incompetent and corrupt a utility could be that it costs 35 cents a kWh to make power and deliver it badly, it would seem that this is a threat to those not on the DAC rate.

Should be a boon for the local solar guys, eyup!

For comparison purposes, investor owned utilities generate from natural gas and deliver power to our office building in TX for 8 cents a kWh and make a nice profit and pay taxes too.

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The "35" cents is only because the exchange rate is high in our favor, if it were back to 10:1 it would be .44 which does include IVA, but you can't get it without IVA so I include it. Even the 78% subsidized rate is no deal, as you note, it's not hard to find .10 per KWH in most areas NOB and in Canuckland, but sorry, we're off the TIP subject, my apology.

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We are working on your deposit recovery and many times aduana messes up, you notified on time so it is getting them the proof of that and having them refund the deposit. They have been maiing lots of errors lately, almost hoping nobody fights it, but we do, that is what is included in our fee.

Thank you Spencer.I appreciate your help with this.

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HI

How about a big add in some of the papers around hear The Mexico Government must not want tourist or retirees anymore by the way Immigration and the Aduana and some of the other offices that have a care less attitude and no clear cut rules in writing to follow without having 3 lawyers to pay to be in compliance if it is possible even then

How about a 1/2 page add in the Guadalajara Reporter for starters

Just my 2 cents

Did I see something about the new President wanting tourist and retirees or was that a Joke

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You did, but it was in the context of making it easier to BUY high end beach properties etc. It's sadly becoming painfully obvious to me at least that our money is all that they are interested in here, or NOB for that matter. Here we are locked out of many or most things, assimilation is ok, if you insist, but not pushed, those Mexicans moving NOB not only flaunt the law, but have no intent of assimilating there, Mexico is, and always will be, home.

All indications are that we are simply cash cows to serve a purpose. They've basically slammed the door on new entrants with limited incomes and only tolerate an aging group of us already here on our way to the great beyond sooner than later and are pruning us and our options when it comes to immigration, home owning, cars etc.

Let me ask a question: we commonly know and talk about Canadian-Americans, African-Americans, Irish-Americans etc & etc, but have you ever heard of an American-Mexican, or a Canadian-Mexican? I've not, there is no such thing as a hyphenated Mexican, you either are one - or you are "other", and I do believe we're learning how they feel about "other".

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You did, but it was in the context of making it easier to BUY high end beach properties etc. It's sadly becoming painfully obvious to me at least that our money is all that they are interested in here, or NOB for that matter. Here we are locked out of many or most things, assimilation is ok, if you insist, but not pushed, those Mexicans moving NOB not only flaunt flout the law, but have no intent of assimilating there, Mexico is, and always will be, home.

All indications are that we are simply cash cows to serve a purpose. They've basically slammed the door on new entrants with limited incomes and only tolerate an aging group of us already here on our way to the great beyond sooner than later and are pruning us and our options when it comes to immigration, home owning, cars etc.

Let me ask a question: we commonly know and talk about Canadian-Americans, African-Americans, Irish-Americans etc & etc, but have you ever heard of an American-Mexican, or a Canadian-Mexican? Of course there are Mexican-Americans. I've not, there is no such thing as a hyphenated Mexican, you either are one - or you are "other", and I do believe we're learning how they feel about "other".

Flaunt means 'to make a display of oneself'. Flout means 'to treat with contempt or scorn'.

There are thousands upon thousands of Mexican-Americans in the United States.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_American

There are also Mexican-Canadians, but very few.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Canadian

I think your thesis is incorrect--the idea that Mexico no longer wants--who, precisely? There are thousands of foreigners from everywhere in the world living in Mexico. A few retirees from the USA and Canada are not the targets of the Mexican government. The inept implementation of the new INM laws and regulations is about ineptness, not a desire to see foreigners leave Mexico.

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If anyone should know Mexico's weakness is execution and implementation, it would be Mexico. So, why didn't they have a grace period of one year to work with the various departments, provide accurate information to facilitators working with foreigners? Why not give foreigners living in Mexico a year to prepare for the costs incurred by this fiasco? It's the slam-dunk that has created so much anxiety for many. I guess that's part of the ineptness. That's a reason, not an excuse and I won't be making any excuses for Mexico.

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The inept implementation of the new INM laws and regulations is about ineptness, not a desire to see foreigners leave Mexico.

Probably true but who really knows? Regardless of what the intent is, the impression in our home and circle of friends is that we are no longer welcome. And that is definitely having an impact where we are, maybe not where you are.

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Probably true but who really knows? Regardless of what the intent is, the impression in our home and circle of friends is that we are no longer welcome. And that is definitely having an impact where we are, maybe not where you are.

What impact?

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If anyone should know Mexico's weakness is execution and implementation, it would be Mexico. So, why didn't they have a grace period of one year to work with the various departments, provide accurate information to facilitators working with foreigners? Why not give foreigners living in Mexico a year to prepare for the costs incurred by this fiasco? It's the slam-dunk that has created so much anxiety for many. I guess that's part of the ineptness. That's a reason, not an excuse and I won't be making any excuses for Mexico.

Agree 100%.

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Here we are locked out of many or most things, assimilation is ok, if you insist, but not pushed, those Mexicans moving NOB not only flaunt flout the law, but have no intent of assimilating there, Mexico is, and always will be, home.

One other thing about what you said in the sentence just above: the same is true of many native-English-speaking foreign residents at Lake Chapala and other expatriate enclaves in Mexico. Very few learn Spanish well enough to interact in more than a rudimentary way with Mexicans, most have their friendship base in people with their own origins and language, few acquire real cultural literacy, fewer attempt to understand the political situation in Mexico, most keep one foot firmly fixed North of the Border without making a real commitment to Mexico, and in conversation and in their hearts, most continue to express that either the USA or Canada is 'back home'. How exactly is that different from what you wrote about Mexicans living North of the Border?

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So many of us forget that the Southwestern USA was recently Mexico, the Northwest was British, the major rivers were French and other areas, Spanish. Is there any wonder that the USA has no official language? We are a mixed lot from many places; we are all recent immigrants from somewhere, unless we are indigenous; and even they originated in Asia.

Mexico has much older civilization and a mix of many earlier cultures, along with more recent ones, but it does have an official language, in spite of several others being spoken freely.

Learning Spanish makes living here much easier, more fun and even less expensive. Most of us will never be fluent, but we should certainly strive to be able to make a phone call, etc.

Since many have no, or very little Spanish, it has probably caused more confusion with INM and Aduana, simply because the laws and rules cannot be read by the individual. Machine translations often leave a lot to be desired.

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One other thing about what you said in the sentence just above: the same is true of many native-English-speaking foreign residents at Lake Chapala and other expatriate enclaves in Mexico. Very few learn Spanish well enough to interact in more than a rudimentary way with Mexicans, most have their friendship base in people with their own origins and language, few acquire real cultural literacy, fewer attempt to understand the political situation in Mexico, most keep one foot firmly fixed North of the Border without making a real commitment to Mexico, and in conversation and in their hearts, most continue to express that either the USA or Canada is 'back home'. How exactly is that different from what you wrote about Mexicans living North of the Border?

Some forget that older retired folks trying to learn a foreign language for the first time don't have an easy go of it. We've been studying it for 5 years and our command of it is still pretty basic. Yes, we can talk in Spanish on the phone, however understanding the return conversation coming at one at what feels like Warp 9 is quite another matter.

Please keep that in mind.

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Some forget that older retired folks trying to learn a foreign language for the first time don't have an easy go of it. We've been studying it for 5 years and our command of it is still pretty basic. Yes, we can talk in Spanish on the phone, however understanding the return conversation coming at one at what feels like Warp 9 is quite another matter.

Please keep that in mind.

My comparison was for the purpose of saying people--whether Mexicans north of the border or English-speaking foreigners south of the border--are alike. For the most part, adult Mexicans in the States don't learn much English. Their kids learn it, though. Retired English-speaking foreigners in Mexico rarely have school-age children.

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All Mexico had to do with regards to cars was akin to the US and Canada with a car from the other country. You can bring your car; you have say 6 months to nationalize it; you can do it at any Aduana office; the fee is reasonable and no broker required; vehicle can be any make no matter where made (Dealers bring in non-NAFTA vehicles daily); it can be any year and you can do it just once.

Definitely fewer expats are coming. On these web boards until a year or so ago, newbies would show up all the time. they would ask questions, plan their move; buy or rent and the expat population grew. I do not see that at lakeside nor SMA. We do not meet totally newcomers in numbers like before..

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All Mexico had to do with regards to cars was akin to the US and Canada with a car from the other country. You can bring your car; you have say 6 months to nationalize it; you can do it at any Aduana office; the fee is reasonable and no broker required; vehicle can be any make no matter where made (Dealers bring in non-NAFTA vehicles daily); it can be any year and you can do it just once.

Definitely fewer expats are coming. On these web boards until a year or so ago, newbies would show up all the time. they would ask questions, plan their move; buy or rent and the expat population grew. I do not see that at lakeside nor SMA. We do not meet totally newcomers in numbers like before..

True, we see less and less newcomers every year. But I don't think the new immigration laws are a big part of the equation. I would put the economic collapse of 2008 and the almost daily news of increased violence in Mexico at the top of the list.

If I were considering moving here now, the new immigration laws wouldn't even be a part of my decision. I think the new laws are a lot more difficult for expats that are already here, but I don't think they have much to do with the decrease we are seeing in people looking for retirement in Mexico.

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