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So how risky is it?


Alegria

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I've gotten my permanente visa but can't take my US-plated car out of the country for at least two more months. Normally, I only drive at Lakeside (never to Guad), but now I'm afraid to take it out of the driveway. How likely am I to get stopped and checked? Have any of you been stopped and asked to show your papers and visa?

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I've gotten my permanente visa but can't take my US-plated car out of the country for at least two more months. Normally, I only drive at Lakeside (never to Guad), but now I'm afraid to take it out of the driveway. How likely am I to get stopped and checked? Have any of you been stopped and asked to show your papers and visa?

You are safer driving in GDL than at Lakeside- cops in the city pay no attention to foreign plates

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Very unlikely you will get stopped. How many times have you been stopped? If you do get stopped the cops don't know about this little detail so far supposedly. Relax.

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My thought: the worst that can happen driving around Lakeside is that you will be stopped and have to pay a bribe. This is not good BUT it is not the end of the world, either. Be sure your other papers are in order, and carry some significant pesos that you can thumb thru while pulling out your documents. Act innocent and be polite but a little naive and dismayed. Well, maybe a LOT naive and dismayed. Normally, I do not think this is a good way to go, but when you are in the wrong, it is showtime.

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My gut feeling there's a hands off policy regarding car plates for a awhile. I don't think the local Govt wants to antagonize ex pats more than they already are. I have not heard, nor have I read any reports of being pulled over for this reason. I'd go with JayBearII.

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My thought: the worst that can happen driving around Lakeside is that you will be stopped and have to pay a bribe. This is not good BUT it is not the end of the world, either. Be sure your other papers are in order, and carry some significant pesos that you can thumb thru while pulling out your documents. Act innocent and be polite but a little naive and dismayed. Well, maybe a LOT naive and dismayed. Normally, I do not think this is a good way to go, but when you are in the wrong, it is showtime.

You're right. It's just a matter of time until some transito hits on this new source of mordida.

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So I was at the SAT office today and the attorney for the government told me that transitos cannot ask for car papers. I said nobody has told them that and he said they want bribes and it is a crime, I said welcome to our world.

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Thanks for all your replies. I've been here 12 years and never (knock on wood) been stopped yet. I was concerned the cops might be recognizing an easy new source of income and so stopping foreign-plated cars more often.

So I was at the SAT office today and the attorney for the government told me that transitos cannot ask for car papers. I said nobody has told them that and he said they want bribes and it is a crime, I said welcome to our world.

Spencer: While transitos cannot ask for car papers, are they permitted to ask to see my visa? If they are, they could know I shouldn't be driving a foreign-plated car.

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I don't know what to say. There is the law and then what really happens. Who has time to fight? Who will pay $$$$????

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So I was at the SAT office today and the attorney for the government told me that transitos cannot ask for car papers.

Huh. I'm confused. I thought that was the only thing they "could" ask for.

1. Driver's LIcense

2. Vehicle registration (which becomes more complicated with a foreign-plated car that has an expired TIP, etc., etc....)

3. (And maybe...) Proof of insurance

I always assumed they had the authority to determine whether a car was legally on the road.

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They should only ask for certain things but reality is another thing. Maybe if I remember I will see if they will give me a general written ruling stating who has authority to ask for papers and then maybe that might help foreigners out, I asked for written rulings from Transito but they made them specific to my so as not to be used for other people. Maybe SAT will play ball and we will have a tool to combat errant traffic cops.

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I've gotten my permanente visa but can't take my US-plated car out of the country for at least two more months. Normally, I only drive at Lakeside (never to Guad), but now I'm afraid to take it out of the driveway. How likely am I to get stopped and checked? Have any of you been stopped and asked to show your papers and visa?

I think the biggest danger here is that you could be driving without insurance. Insurance companies are notorious for using any pretext to deny a claim, and if it's true that you car is illegal, you might find yourself in a situation you would rather not be in.

I would talk to your agent and see if the insurance company would provide you with indemnification in documented form.

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I know of only one person ever getting a vehicle impounded by ADUANA for having NO TIP. He is the ex of my friend. This happened in Culiacan in Christmas 2006. He is a Mexican National. His business was buying vehicles at San Diego auctions, nationalizing them, and driving them to his home town of Morelia to sell.

He had a Chevy pickup with his name on the title, Calif. plates and drove to Culiacan with it before nationalizing it.

He got drunk and was sleeping in it on the street at 4AM. The police called ADUANA that morning after they arrested him, he apparently became belligerent with the police.

They towed it to an impound lot.

His brother, who lives in Culiacan, knew somebody who helped him get the pickup back.

It took a week and $15,000 pesos.

ADUANA gave him a safe return.

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For those such as Municipal police who have no right to ask for your visa, say you do not have it with you even if you do. Then the car permit also becomes a non issue as they can not even go there with regards to PR and car status.

How many people do any of you know by name who had their car confiscated regarding PR and foreign plated car?

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I know of only one person ever getting a vehicle impounded by ADUANA for having NO TIP. He is the ex of my friend. This happened in Culiacan in Christmas 2006. He is a Mexican National. His business was buying vehicles at San Diego auctions, nationalizing them, and driving them to his home town of Morelia to sell.

He had a Chevy pickup with his name on the title, Calif. plates and drove to Culiacan with it before nationalizing it.

He got drunk and was sleeping in it on the street at 4AM. The police called ADUANA that morning after they arrested him, he apparently became belligerent with the police.

They towed it to an impound lot.

His brother, who lives in Culiacan, knew somebody who helped him get the pickup back.

It took a week and $15,000 pesos.

ADUANA gave him a safe return.

Jeeze, just one little infraction and it got impounded.......

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For those such as Municipal police who have no right to ask for your visa, say you do not have it with you even if you do. Then the car permit also becomes a non issue as they can not even go there with regards to PR and car status.

How many people do any of you know by name who had their car confiscated regarding PR and foreign plated car?

Maybe the police in San Miguel where you live, don't ask. But here, they do.

Transitos and local cops are allowed to ask for TIP paperwork. In the past, Spencer helped us get letters at time of FM3/FM2 renewals that notified Aduana of that visa extension; we carried the letter so that the TIP on windshield which long ago expired, would be OK.

Frankly it makes sense that a traffic cop can ask to see a driver's car registration, which in the case of expats is the TIP; if the TIP's date is seemingly expired, and the driver is relying on the extension of the TiP based on the renewal of their Visa, then it's reasonable to ask for the Visa.

For people going to PR, there is no 'letter' to extend their TIP any longer. So, when they are stopped their TIP will be expired (at face value), the transito is going question them.

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They should only ask for certain things but reality is another thing. Maybe if I remember I will see if they will give me a general written ruling stating who has authority to ask for papers and then maybe that might help foreigners out, I asked for written rulings from Transito but they made them specific to my so as not to be used for other people. Maybe SAT will play ball and we will have a tool to combat errant traffic cops.

Seems to me Jalisco Traffic Law is quite explicit on this point.

LEY DE LOS SERVICIOS DE VIALIDAD, TRÁNSITO Y TRANSPORTE DEL ESTADO DE JALISCO

Artículo 51. Los vehículos registrados en el extranjero podrán circular en el Estado, si sus conductores acreditan la legal internación y estancia en el país de los mismos, mediante la documentación expedida por las autoridades federales competentes.

Translation: Vehicles registered abroad may circulate within the State, if their drivers accredit the legal entrance and stay in the country of same by means of documentation issued by the proper federal authorities.

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I'm not sure I understand your point. The question here is whether the Transitos, who tend to operate at least locally like a gang of extortionists, have the right to shake you down for your immigration documents including car papers. Spencer is trying to determine just what the limits of their authority is, if any.

Could you elaborate on how you think what you posted relates to that? Are you suggesting that what you posted gives them the authority to look at immigration papers? Car papers?

Thanks.

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I know two people who were pulled over (one in Chapala and one in Ajijic) who did not have their TIP papers, or visa or drivers licence. Nada.

They both had the same approach to dealing with it. Admitted it was bad that they did not have their papers, said they were stolen, would they get a ticket? Here is all the money I have, would that be enough? Thank you and good bye. One had an old beater car and paid 50 pesos and the other had a Rav 4 and paid 500.

While these local tranitos are corrupt, at least they make it easy to get out of trouble when you need a break.

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I know two people who were pulled over (one in Chapala and one in Ajijic) who did not have their TIP papers, or visa or drivers licence. Nada.

They both had the same approach to dealing with it. Admitted it was bad that they did not have their papers, said they were stolen, would they get a ticket? Here is all the money I have, would that be enough? Thank you and good bye. One had an old beater car and paid 50 pesos and the other had a Rav 4 and paid 500.

While these local tranitos are corrupt, at least they make it easy to get out of trouble when you need a break.

I like that approach...

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