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"Taste" in restaurants


ComputerGuy

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Since FHBoy posted this in a closed thread, I'm starting a new one:

As a former film critic (a waaaay long time ago!) I learned that any review is only as complete as 1) the actual experience and 2) the reviewers POV. Unless any of us here are connoisseurs, professional chefs or inveterate foodies with an extensive portfolio of restaurants eaten at, we need to accept that our experience is colored by those two factors. What I have found here is that I need to make a minimum of three visits to any place in order to form an opinion worth publishing. Also, coming from New York, Philadelphia and Baltimore, my taste buds are used to a certain thing. Yours may be from Toronto, BC, Minnesota, LA or Dallas and you have a different interpretation of how food "should" taste and be presented. Gee, it comes down to a simple, duh, thing: "It's a matter of taste!" Caveat: If many of us "amateurs" seem to have a siomilar reaction/opinion, perhaps there is a preponderance of evidence that what is said is "true". In any case - isn't it great we have the time and luxury to do all this? Life's good.

I would agree that some restaurants need several visits. Two is pretty telling, though. And some need only one, because it is quite easy to see from what you ordered to eat and drink, whether the rest of their stuff is going to be worthwhile trying.

For example, a salad is a salad is a salad. If your table salad sucks, it's always going to. If your steak is a bit over or underdone, but tastes good, that's a different story. If your mixed drink is wrong, there is no way the bartender "had a bad day". If the fish with your chips is soggy, greasy, and the batter is weird, and the dead mushroom appetizer with fake cheese is just awful, it's pretty safe to say that their cooking is not going to be up to snuff anywhere else on the menu. If they can't do a simple appetizer, well, ... . Unless they specialize in one dish and shoulda stayed away from everything else.

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Since FHBoy posted this in a closed thread, I'm starting a new one:

I would agree that some restaurants need several visits. Two is pretty telling, though. And some need only one, because it is quite easy to see from what you ordered to eat and drink, whether the rest of their stuff is going to be worthwhile trying.

For example, a salad is a salad is a salad. If your table salad sucks, it's always going to. If your steak is a bit over or underdone, but tastes good, that's a different story. If your mixed drink is wrong, there is no way the bartender "had a bad day". If the fish with your chips is soggy, greasy, and the batter is weird, and the dead mushroom appetizer with fake cheese is just awful, it's pretty safe to say that their cooking is not going to be up to snuff anywhere else on the menu. If they can't do a simple appetizer, well, ... . Unless they specialize in one dish and shoulda stayed away from everything else.

Good points!

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Good points!

And I do agree that taste is all a matter of taste. I remember a beer commercial back home, where one guy was telling another "Your taste buds are all in your toes!".

Been here a few years now, and agree with the statement elsewhere that places like Cozumel have certain charms for newbies... which I think only wears off as we get to experience more and more. I know when family members come to visit they can't stay away from Casita del Moljcajete, I place I never go anymore without visitors.

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About "taste": We all eat, so we're all food critics.

However, we do all know when the restaurant is dirty, the cook inadequate (overdone; underdone) and the service "not".

I've dined with people who, when the hot sauce arrives, pour it so thickly over whatever they are served that they can't judge what they're eating. Now THAT's a matter of taste. I say "give food a chance".

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You must know my brother-in-law. When I buy prime NY Strip from Costco in the States he asks for it to be well done and dumps A1 Sauce all over it. At at least I have gotten him away from catsup!

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Bet Robuchon doesn't do carrot fritters and Roberto often had OK escargot in the past! Personally, I try to stay away from any place with fewer than 3 Michelin stars. Your board name is well chosen.

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What are the three star places around Lakeside? That would be interesting.

Oh yeah, objective things like dirty kitchens, dirty lavs, and dirty stuff are not subjective like taste and are a "hard fact" as opposed to an opinion for a critic.

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Implying that one has had the good luck and/or good fortune to dine in highly rated places around the globe is useless. Memories are nice, and it's nice to know that some of my neighbors have sophisticated palates, but what's the relevance? We don't have those options around here. If you like driving in miserable traffic, there's Guadalajara and an improvement in choices. That drive usually spoils my appetite and leaves me wanting clean air and peace more than I want a taste treat.

Michelin star talk about restaurants in this remote outpost of the universe is just pointless. People do not survive in a starred up restaurant without a clientele to support them, and that's not what we have here. This isn't New York or Paris. It is what it is, so let's judge the critters in their own class.

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FHBoy was quoted as saying, "As a former film critic (a waaaay long time ago!) I learned that any review is only as complete as 1) the actual experience and 2) the reviewers POV. Unless any of us here are connoisseurs, professional chefs or inveterate foodies with an extensive portfolio of restaurants eaten at, we need to accept that our experience is colored by those two factors."

I'm a connoisseur, a professional chef and an inveterate foodie with an extensive portfolio of restaurants eaten at [sic], and I believe that what I offer in any restaurant review I write is my opinion only. That opinion might influence which restaurant you go to to spend your money, but it can't possibly make you like or dislike a dish. That opinion might cause you to think that you should like a dish, but you end up hating it. That opinion might influence which restaurant you stay away from--you might think my prior opinions have missed the mark entirely, so why should you risk taking my recommendation again?

For all you know, the chef/owner at Restaurant A+ might be my best friend and I'm writing a puff piece to get butts in the seats. For all you know, the boss chef might have changed since I wrote an iffy review of Restaurant D-, and the new guy creates celestial food. For all you know, I have lost my actual sense of taste and just pretend to know what flavor anything is. And for all you know, I can sniff out a morel from an amanita at 50 paces. And so what?

You are the only person whose opinion counts about whether or not you like a restaurant. If you're used to catsup on your filet mignon and the bearnaise just doesn't cut it for you, who am I to tell you you're wrong? What you like is what you like.

Enjoy your dinner.

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On a practical level, we don't have any "authorities" around to rate either our local restaurants or our local artists. We are left to judge for ourselves, based on our experiences and knowledge.

Van Gogh was a failure during his lifetime as far as the "authorities" and the buying public were concerned. Picasso had much better PR after an initial struggle. Efren is a popular local painter. Whether his work will be in major museums in a century is another matter.

It gets down to whether you are of the opinion that your taste is superior to that of others. If you are, then rate the local restaurants for yourself, because it will be a cold day in May in Lakeside before any genuine "authorities" come calling and do the ratings.

There are no three star restaurants in this area. Probably no two's or even ones. There are some pretentious "chefs". There is some very edible food.

As More Liana says: enjoy your dinner.

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FHBoy was quoted as saying, "As a former film critic (a waaaay long time ago!) I learned that any review is only as complete as 1) the actual experience and 2) the reviewers POV. Unless any of us here are connoisseurs, professional chefs or inveterate foodies with an extensive portfolio of restaurants eaten at, we need to accept that our experience is colored by those two factors."

I'm a connoisseur, a professional chef and an inveterate foodie with an extensive portfolio of restaurants eaten at [sic], and I believe that what I offer in any restaurant review I write is my opinion only. That opinion might influence which restaurant you go to to spend your money, but it can't possibly make you like or dislike a dish. That opinion might cause you to think that you should like a dish, but you end up hating it. That opinion might influence which restaurant you stay away from--you might think my prior opinions have missed the mark entirely, so why should you risk taking my recommendation again?

For all you know, the chef/owner at Restaurant A+ might be my best friend and I'm writing a puff piece to get butts in the seats. For all you know, the boss chef might have changed since I wrote an iffy review of Restaurant D-, and the new guy creates celestial food. For all you know, I have lost my actual sense of taste and just pretend to know what flavor anything is. And for all you know, I can sniff out a morel from an amanita at 50 paces. And so what?

You are the only person whose opinion counts about whether or not you like a restaurant. If you're used to catsup on your filet mignon and the bearnaise just doesn't cut it for you, who am I to tell you you're wrong? What you like is what you like.

Enjoy your dinner.

-

Thank you, Mel Brooks!

It sort of goes like this...if you like it, go there, if you don't, don't. I suppose in the end, we must trust ourselves as the ultimate critic of what we like to eat, after all it all goes into our mouth, not that of the critic. Let's all cheer individuality!

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Yeah, I'd have to say comparing artists is a losing game. Food is a lot easier. I think my tastes are "competent"; that is, I know a thing or two about good food and bad food. But I love snails and my girlfriend hates 'em... so yes, it's all a matter of taste.

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I still do not understand why Americans do not like mayonnaise with their French fries

(actually,.... Belgian fries ( *)... ?? :017::017:;)

Rony

(*)

The Origin of French fries Belgian fries, the pride of Belgium!

mascotte-vlag-hr-b.jpg


The story goes that fries date back to 1680: the inhabitants of Namur, Andenne and Dinant in Belgium used to fish in the Meuse River and fry the little fish they caught to improve their diet. However, when rivers and streams froze over and it was dangerous to fish, people used to cut potatoes into the shape of little fish and fry them.

cornetfrites-droite-detoure.png



As for the name "French fries", it is alleged to come from either the Irish "to french", meaning "to cut", or from the American allies who, when they landed in the Belgian Ardennes, tasted our incomparable fried potatoes and called them "French fries", French for the language spoken by the inhabitants and fries because of the way they were cooked. Whenever the case may be, fries are definitely Belgian!

http://www.lutosa.com/uk/products/the-origin-of-french-fries/

Sorry, but had an irresistable chauvinistic moment coming up.

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I still do not understand why Americans do not like mayonnaise with their French fries

(actually,.... Belgian fries ( *)... ?? :017::017:;)

Rony

Because Americans do not have good mayonaise (or good fries). I worked in Antwerp and I want mayonaise with my fries.

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Implying that one has had the good luck and/or good fortune to dine in highly rated places around the globe is useless. Memories are nice, and it's nice to know that some of my neighbors have sophisticated palates, but what's the relevance? We don't have those options around here. If you like driving in miserable traffic, there's Guadalajara and an improvement in choices. That drive usually spoils my appetite and leaves me wanting clean air and peace more than I want a taste treat.

Michelin star talk about restaurants in this remote outpost of the universe is just pointless. People do not survive in a starred up restaurant without a clientele to support them, and that's not what we have here. This isn't New York or Paris. It is what it is, so let's judge the critters in their own class.

That was the point that I was trying to make.... We are fortunate to have as many fun and interesting place to eat as we do!

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If I had mayonnaise overseas, I wouldn't remember, since I was only five... but I've never heard anyone say American mayonnaise is not good. Is bottled mayo over there more like home-made, then?

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Implying that one has had the good luck and/or good fortune to dine in highly rated places around the globe is useless. Memories are nice, and it's nice to know that some of my neighbors have sophisticated palates, but what's the relevance? We don't have those options around here. If you like driving in miserable traffic, there's Guadalajara and an improvement in choices. That drive usually spoils my appetite and leaves me wanting clean air and peace more than I want a taste treat.

Michelin star talk about restaurants in this remote outpost of the universe is just pointless. People do not survive in a starred up restaurant without a clientele to support them, and that's not what we have here. This isn't New York or Paris. It is what it is, so let's judge the critters in their own class.

Hear hear!!

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The bottled or tubed mayonnaise in France is more like homemade, I do not know about other European countries since mayonnaise is not something I use a lot of. The US mayonnaise is different, not better not worst. It has different uses and you can for some reason eat a whole lot more of it in one seating...There is a whole lot of differences between the brands in the States as well so it all a question of taste.

As far as the Michelin rating , Michelin rates atmosphere, service and a whole bunch of things besides the food. None of the restaurants we have here would even make one star but they do not charge one star price either.

One year one of the bosses decided that we would only eat in but 3 stars and that is what we did for 10 days, lunch and dinner. It was total hell after 3 days . When we arrived at Michel Blanc in Burgundy we sneaked out for lunch to have a pizza in the village. That was the best pizza we ever had... There is a place for all types of food and variety is really important .

Ajijic has decent restaurants for the area, actually better than i many other places of the same size.

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Geez, this is tiresome. I need no ones opinion about where I might eat. I will listen to stories, but I make my own decisions. We have lots of choices locally, some good, some mediocre, some downright terrible. The later will not survive. Everyone have a great day and enjoy eating out...or stay home.

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