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Interesting Car import info


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I understand its not worth it to try to bring a out of state car to mexico. is that right?

New laws? We were going to drive on our final move this year to Ajijic from CA. Spenser said to leave it here and sell it. What are people going to do who have been bypassing the mexico law and choosing the S.D. plates and other outside plated cars, now that they can not be able to do the temp. residency anymore?

That's a very good question and a lot of us are wrestling with it right now. Under the old law, we could renew the FM3 or FM2 indefinitely and the car was covered by article 106 as long as you never let the visa lapse but always renewed before expiration.

Now, you have a maximum of 4 years as Temporal at which time you either have to take your chances getting a new Temporal by leaving the country and applying at a Mexican Consul, or you have to switch to permanente and at least in the early going, some of the Aduana offices are taking the position that Permanente is like the Immigrado it replaces and does not allow keeping a foreign plated car in the country.

However, some Aduana have indicated that there is no new regulation yet that clearly covers the new visa categories.

So who the hell knows?

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That would be great but no indication thus far from Aduana to support that theory.

We have no trouble at all paying a reasonable sum to import the car and get Mexican plates. I'm tired of being hassled by the crooked cops because of my Texas plates.

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That would be great but no indication thus far from Aduana to support that theory.

We have no trouble at all paying a reasonable sum to import the car and get Mexican plates. I'm tired of being hassled by the crooked cops because of my Texas plates.

My husband and I wondered if that was just a good target for the bad guys or cops as it may be. We personally even before the new laws came, where going to get Mexico plates. We want to blend into the community.

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Importación definitiva de vehículos usados

http://www.aduanas.sat.gob.mx/aduana_mexico/2008/vehiculos/141_10039.html

This seems to clearly indicate that the importation must be done at the northern border or at a maritime port. So maybe Puerto Vallarta or Manzanillo is possible unless the car has to be on a boat when it comes into port and not driven in over land.

Thanks, for the website address

However- think we all are confusing the term IMPORTATION when we should be using the term NATIONALIZATION-

assuming we all have an Importation Sticker on our car- it means we have crossed the Mexican border in No. America or imported our car through an authorized port of entry . and we have Mex. Gov. permission to the legal use of our vehicles while we maintain our temporary Visa Status without lapse.

If Tio Corp is now doing Nationalizations without taking the car physically to the border - then there has to be a way to accomplish Nationalization at any authorized Audana office without paying a huge amount of $$ for a facilitator

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Tio Corp is operating under a temporary program. They don't take either your title or your car. They do need photographic copies of the title and pictures of the window and door stickers. It is not cheap, $1650 for a 2006 Honda CRV but given how expensive cars are here and the loss you inevitably take disposing of a used U.S. plated car, it is cheap.

The hook is that you have to have your permanente to complete the process. Getting the Pedimento takes about a month but getting the permanentes is taking two months so you have to juggle the scheduling. Although you can start the nationalization process before you have the permanmente, you can't finish it until you do.

Life is never dull. :)

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over 300 to TIO Corp right now.

contact them directly... i contacted via a web site... followed up when i had not heard in a week.... they said they never got it.

also -- Tio Corp has had someone successfully get Jalisco plates for a J (non-NAFTA) car

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Note that the Tio Corp nationalization is under a specific pair of amparos, through only one importer in Juarez. It is a temporary window of opportunity and it includes years and non-Nafta vehicles not normally allowed under the standard nationalization rules.

I am starting my permanente early today in the hope we can get in on the program before it terminates. It takes 2 months for a permanente and one month for a pedimento under this program so my plan is to start the permanente today and start the nationalization in about a month. I'll keep everyone posted as this progresses, hopefully right through to Jalisco plates for my "J" Honda CRV.

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Note that the Tio Corp nationalization is under a specific pair of amparos, through only one importer in Juarez. It is a temporary window of opportunity and it includes years and non-Nafta vehicles not normally allowed under the standard nationalization rules.

I am starting my permanente early today in the hope we can get in on the program before it terminates. It takes 2 months for a permanente and one month for a pedimento under this program so my plan is to start the permanente today and start the nationalization in about a month. I'll keep everyone posted as this progresses, hopefully right through to Jalisco plates for my "J" Honda CRV.

Thanks. I'm asking a general question. In the discussion on their web site of the nationalization of NAFTA cars they state that you must be a permanent resident to nationalize an age eligible NAFTA car. Makes me wonder if they know what they are doing as I don't beleieve this to be correct.

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Thanks. I'm asking a general question. In the discussion on their web site of the nationalization of NAFTA cars they state that you must be a permanent resident to nationalize an age eligible NAFTA car. Makes me wonder if they know what they are doing as I don't beleieve this to be correct.

I have been told by our lawyer that we can "nationalize" our NAFTA vehicle now as it is 10 years old and that we do not have to wait until we get our permanente. However, we don't need to apply for our permanente until October, so I am waiting to see if there is any further clarification of the rules by customs.
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Thanks. I'm asking a general question. In the discussion on their web site of the nationalization of NAFTA cars they state that you must be a permanent resident to nationalize an age eligible NAFTA car. Makes me wonder if they know what they are doing as I don't beleieve this to be correct.

IMHO, TIO Corp is simply listing its requirements, not the Mexican government's.

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Or they are listing the requirement of the Juarez importation agent. I called Tio about this and Judy said that the aduana at the border stated they will not allow vehicle imports for temporary residents.

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Thanks all. One of our cars is an older US plated car that's not worth a whole lot. We would like to be able to nationalize it and give it to our maid and gardner...

We have a few renewals eft on our FM3's and aren't planning on selling our house anytime soon so we probably are not going to apply for permanent resident status until they expire to avoid the hassle of having to have the financials translated.

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over 300 to TIO Corp right now.

contact them directly... i contacted via a web site... followed up when i had not heard in a week.... they said they never got it.

also -- Tio Corp has had someone successfully get Jalisco plates for a J (non-NAFTA) car

So they were able to verify that the pedimento is legal? Assuming Jalisco wouln't issue the plates if the pedimento was not? Would love to hear from someone directly who has completed the process through Tio Corp.

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Does the Tio Corp method provide for getting the aduana receipt which takes the vehicle off the original record of the owner when temporarily imported? If not, potential problems would remain.

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FYI - My 2005 Volvo is NOT covered by this and is therefore soon heading back to the USA for sale. Volvos from 2008-2012 are OK for this - according to Tio Corp.

Not looking forward to that trip. Oh well.....

Once my "green card" arrangements are completed. I will be a Permanente, so I couldn't keep it here anyway.

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  • 3 weeks later...

A very interesting recent update on the whole situation. Be sure to read the part about some insurance companies denying coverage in the event of an accident saying that the car is not "legal" in Mexico.

http://yucalandia.com/driving-in-mexico-issues-fun/options-for-foreign-plated-tip-car-owners-in-mexico-esp-for-permanent-residents/

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Interesting but remember it is just one person's opinion-someone who isn't a Mexican lawyer. Many others disagree with his interpretation.

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Interesting but remember it is just one person's opinion-someone who isn't a Mexican lawyer. Many others disagree with his interpretation.

True, but the article is not just one person's opinion, as like in this part:

Our efforts worked! Lic. Karen Villaseñor of Aduana de DF has been ordering errant local Aduana official to change their past mistaken policies and allow Residente Temporal card holders to renew their TIPs. Lic. Villaseñor has gotten the Aduana central Hotline phone agents to now all give the correct answers: Yes, if you had an FM2 or FM3, and now have a Residente Temporal card, then you can apply to Aduana to extend your Aduana TIP on your foreign plated car to match the expiration date on your fresh shiny INM card. Ms. Villaseñor speaks only Spanish, but she offers her number for you to call with TIP problems. She says that we should give her number to any Aduana clerks who are not following the current national policy, and she “will straighten them out.”:

Lic. Karen Villaseñor 01-55-5802-0000 x46889

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Okay I'll change opinion to reporting. One person's reporting of selected events without verification.

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  • 1 month later...

I have just spoken to someone who can arrange to legitimately obtain Mexican plates for an eligible foreign plated vehicle. In our case it is a 2003 Jeep which can be imported under NAFTA and doesn't need to use the TioCorp amparo "loophole" mentioned above.

He quoted a total of MXN$36,950 made up as follows:

Aduana (customs) MXN$20,000; Permit MXN$ 1,450; Payments to Jalisco State for plates etc. MXN$5,000. Agent's fee MXN$10,000.

I understand the process takes about 45 days and involves the agent having to take the vehicle into customs in Guadalajara to be inspected. This would mean being without the vehicle for a day and a half.

I am also told that other services are available for a lower cost that involve getting Mexico state plates from Mexico City. However, it is my impression that in some cases, the documentation presented to get them may have some deficiencies. If so, this could result in a problem if the vehicle is in an accident and this is discovered. In that case, the insurance would be invalid. Also the vehicle might be impounded.

So sounds like a scam...he is doing something illegal if you say vehicle might be impounded

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You appear to have misread my post that you have quoted at length. The reference I made to a vehicle being impounded is to other crooks in the area. Mr. Mora is, as far as my research has gone, honest. Also see Kevin Paulini's and my comments about Mr. Mora on the TioCorp thread.

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