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Reminds me of when I was in Australia.  The Australian white potato is about twice the size of the russet potato.  They make great fish and chips.  One day I was at the Ballarat market and a man was parked there with a pickup load of russet potatos.  He was having a tough time selling them as they were so much smaller than the potatos the Aussies were use to.  He told me you know I got the spuds for these potatos from the states but I don't think I will plant any more of them.

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Aren't the baked potatoes served at Bruno's russets?  I used to get a russet-like potato when I frequently drove to Patzcuaro in a little town called Villa Jimenez.  I assume they were grown nearby.  They baked very much like a russet, fluffy not "boney" like the white potatoes most local restaurants serve.  I don't know what a russet is called in Spanish; I have only heard them called "papas sucias"--dirty potatoes.  Don't russets need cold weather like in Idaho?  Maybe that's why they are not grown locally.

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On 9/7/2018 at 3:45 PM, Joco said:

Potatoes from the US were legal to import last year and illegal again this year.  The decision can still be overturned by the MX Supreme Court.

https://www.potatopro.com/news/2018/mexican-judge-bans-potato-import-us-foreign-power-hostile-policies

The date of my post about the illegality of importing potatoes into Mexico was 2013--five years ago already!  Things change...

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1 hour ago, bdlngton said:

Aren't the baked potatoes served at Bruno's russets?  I used to get a russet-like potato when I frequently drove to Patzcuaro in a little town called Villa Jimenez.  I assume they were grown nearby.  They baked very much like a russet, fluffy not "boney" like the white potatoes most local restaurants serve.  I don't know what a russet is called in Spanish; I have only heard them called "papas sucias"--dirty potatoes.  Don't russets need cold weather like in Idaho?  Maybe that's why they are not grown locally. 

No, unless they smuggled them in somehow. And how would it be possible for a place like that.

Cool nights and sunny days. Several kinds of russets are popularly grown in Idaho. And potatos don't like rain; they do, however, like mountains.

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It is easy to grow Russets here, but there some important twists. Firstly, you have to buy potato seed, not tubers - they will never be allowed in. Secondly, choose a variety which grows/matures to a smaller size- this is quite common to organically grown local vegetables. The Russets grown in Idaho, Northern Mexico, and Prince Edward Island require a lot of pesticides and chemicals to get to the giant size demanded by food companies such as McDonalds. I thought of commercially growing potatoes, but after harvesting a large bin of Camiotes, I realized that this very hard work, you really need a gas/diesel powered potato digger - under $10,000 from China. Then the workers pickup the loose potatoes, onto washing and sorting. I have found a source of "Nugget" Russet seeds, as well as Marie Piper seeds, an Irish potato very popular in the U.K., especiallly for frying. My sub-tropical Rhubarb from Austrailia is doing very well in our climate, it has commercial possibilities as well. The ancient Mexican squash, grown for its seeds, is of course thriving in this climate - very prolific.

http://tatermaterseeds.com/shop/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=25

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