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http://www.yucatanex...-laws-2012.html

New Immigration Laws 2012

By Yucatan Expatriate Services on October 15, 2012

On September 28, 2012 a new set of Regulations of the Immigration Laws of Mexico were officially published. The new laws themselves were published and discussed over a year ago, but were not put into effect and the details were not released. Now details have been explained and the regulations will be in effect soon, so now is the time to let everyone know what has changed.

These new regulations will come into effect 30 working days from the date of publication (on or about November 12, 2012). The regulations regarding the General Law of Population on migratory control, verification and regulation will then be officially annulled, including the Manual on Criteria and Migratory Procedures of the National Institute of Migration through which the present visa designations of Non-Immigrant, Immigrant and Immigrated were defined. Anyone with a current visa (FM2 or FM3) can continue to use their current visa until the expiration date, at which point they will have to renew under one of the categories outlined below.

New Immigration Law Details

The following are the most important new details of this new act:

The Migratory status of “Non-Immigrant” (previously known as FM3), “Immigrant” (previously known as FM2) and Immigrated (Inmigrado) shall cease to exist and shall be replaced by visas that pertain to the ‘conditions of stay’. The new designations will be Visitor (Visitante), Temporary Resident (Residente Temporal) and Permanent Resident (Residente Permanente).

The present visa cards or booklets designating FM2 or FM3 status will cease to be valid and will be replaced by Visitor, Temporary Resident and Permanent Resident cards.

The newly published regulations establish the criteria, requirements and procedures for the following types of visas. We want to stress that the people at the immigration offices are getting trained as we write this article, so details about how these rules will be enacted and questions about discrepancies and changes are still unclear.

Visitor Visa without Permission to Engage in Lucrative Activities (Visa de visitante sin permiso para realizar actividades remuneradas)

This visa may be granted for up to ten years. The applicant may be granted this visa if they can demonstrate one or more of the following circumstances:

-They have sufficient economic solvency

-They are a frequent traveler to Mexico

-They are a researcher, scientist, humanist, artist, athlete, prestigious journalist (national or international) or are another type of promiment person

-They are the spouse, concubine or equivalent, child, parent or sibling of a Mexican or a temporary or permanent resident, but are not intending to reside in the country

-They are the spouse, concubine or equivalent, child, parent or sibling of a diplomatic or consular official accredited in Mexico who are ordinary passport holders

-Being a supervisor of a foreign company with a subsidiary in the country or executive staff of subsidiaries or sales offices of Mexican companies abroad.

A non-Mexican who obtains this visa may request the issuance of the same for their spouse, concubine or equivalent and their children, if the children or adolescents are under their legal custody or if they are over-age but still in their legal custody. In this case, the applicant must prove the relationship and they must also prove that they have sufficient economic solvency to support those dependents, and that they are frequent travelers.

This visa will be issued for those non-Mexicans interested in being in the country for no more than 180 days.

Visitor visa with permission to engage in lucrative activities (Visa de visitante con permiso para realizar actividades remuneradas)

This visa will be issued for those non-Mexicans interested in doing business in Mexico for no more than 180 days. The individuals or legally-established corporations in the country who want to give a job to a non-Mexican may submit an application for a specific person to perform a specific job. They must provide the following information:

-Proof of an employer registration record issued by the Instituto Nacional de Migración (INM)

-The name and nationality of the non-Mexican

-The position he or she will perform for the company

-The amount of compensation for this position and this person

-The duration of the job

-The address of the workplace

-Proof of ability to pay for his/her travel

Immigration authorities may conduct verification visits to the workplace to check the veracity of the job, the existence of the petitioner or any other information presented in the application. Upon approval, the visa issues will allow the person performing the job to engage in activities for pay and will be for the duration of the position as stated in the application.

Visitor Visa For Adoption (Visa de visitante para realizar trámites de adopción)

The visitor visa for adoption procedures may be issued to non-Mexicans linked to an adoption process in Mexico. The applicant must provide proof of the existence or initiation of an international adoption procedure with the National System for Integral Family Development (DIF) in Mexico.

The visitor visa for adoption purposes will be issued for only one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry. The non-Mexican must request this visa within the first thirty calendar days after his/her entry into Mexico. This visa will remain valid until the adoption has concluded and, where appropriate, the formalities of registration before the Civil Registry, such as issuing passports and other necessary arrangements to ensure that the child or adolescent will be admitted to the country of residence of the adopter, have been completed.

Temporary Resident Visa (Visa de residente temporal)

The temporary resident visa is issued to a non-Mexican who declares his/her intention to remain in Mexico for a period exceeding one hundred and eighty days and up to four years. The applicant must demonstrate one of the following:

-Sufficient economic resources to pay for accommodations and meals during their stay in Mexico

-Participation in a scientific research project or sample collection in Mexico or the territorial waters of Mexico, after having obtained the appropriate authorizations from the appropriate national authorities (e.g., INAH, etc.)

-Family relationship to a Mexican, temporary or permanent resident

-An invitation from an organization or a public or private institution in Mexico to participate in any activity for which they will gain no income. The invitation should be on letterhead and indicate the activity that the applicant will be performing, the duration and the address of the workplace and the person or company accepting responsibility to pay for their travel and living expenses. Otherwise, the applicant must demonstrate sufficient economic solvency to cover his/her living expenses during his/her stay in the country

-Ownership of real estate in Mexico with a value equivalent to the amount stipulated in the “General Administrative Provisions” which will be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and has not yet been published in the Mexican Official Gazette

-Ownership of investments in Mexico that consist of:

Capital stock in Mexican companies in accordance with laws and other legal provisions, with a value that exceeds the amount provided for in the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

Movable or fixed assets used for commercial or business in accordance with laws and other legal provisions, whose value exceeds the amount provided for in the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

Development of economic and business activities in the country in accordance with laws and other legal provisions that generate formal jobs in terms of the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

The temporary resident visa will be valid for one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry. The applicant must apply for the resident card within the first thirty calendar days after their entry into Mexico. After 4 years with the temporary resident visa, the applicant can apply for the permanent resident visa.

Temporary Student Resident Visa (Visa de residente temporal estudiante)

This visa is issued to a non-Mexican who intends to enter into Mexico for courses, studies, research projects or training in educational institutions belonging to the Mexican national education system which will last for more than one hundred and eighty days. The temporary student resident visa is valid for one hundred eighty calendar days with a single entry. The applicant must apply for the resident card within the first thirty calendar days after his or her entry into Mexico.

Permanent Resident Visa (Visa de residente permanente)

This visa will be issued to a non-Mexican who intends to enter the country in order to reside indefinitely. The applicant must demonstrate one of the following situations:

-Family relationship to a Mexican or permanent resident of Mexico

-Retirement status, with sufficient monthly income to cover living expenses during their stay in Mexico. Currently, “sufficient monthly income” is 250 times the minimum salary in Mexico city for FM3 and 400 times the minimum salary for FM2. (The minimum daily salary at this writing is $62.33 pesos. That would make the minimums for visas $15,582.50 pesos and $24,932.00 pesos ($1215.35 USD and $1944.61 USD at $12.82 pesos to the USD).)

-Meeting the categories and the minimum score required to enter through the Point System under the “General Administrative Provisions” (to be issued by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and published in the Mexican Official Gazette)

-That he or she has been granted political asylum by the Mexican government

The permanent resident visa will be valid for one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry. The applicant must apply for their resident card within the first thirty calendar days after his or her entry into Mexico.

The Point System for Mexican Visas

There are eight basic categories in the selection criteria of the new Point System for eligibility for Permanent Residency. It is Mexico’s hope that these criteria will attract foreign investors or people with high competency in areas such as science, technology, sports, arts and humanities or any other skills that strengthen and promote the development and competitiveness of Mexico.

The selection criteria may include, but are not limited to, the following:

-Education level

-Work experience in areas of interest to the country that have high demand and low supply

-Work experience in other areas

-Investor

-Skills in science and technology

-Acknowledgements and international awards

-Spanish language proficiency

-Knowledge of Mexican culture

The Ministry of Foreign Affairs will issue the categories in the “General Administrative Provisions” which will be published in the Mexican Official Gazette. This will also include the weighting of points corresponding to each category, as well as the minimum score required to enter through this route.

The Ministry will review the Point System every three years, and if necessary will publish in the Mexican Official Gazette any addendums, modifications or deletions of categories. They may also change the weighting of points corresponding to each category, as well as the minimum scores and any other information in the Point System.

A non-Mexican who wishes to enter the country through the Point System must apply for visa at the consular office, attaching a completed pre-qualification form, accompanied by the documents proving that they meet the requirements of the category.

The non-Mexican holder of a temporary resident visa or temporary work visa who wishes to remain in Mexico when their visa runs out may request a change to the status of permanent resident status via the Point System.

Other Visa-Related Considerations

A visitor visa application for adoption and temporary resident student can in no case be made directly to the Institute.

Consular offices may issue a replacement temporary resident visa, the temporary student resident visa, permanent resident visa, visitor visa for adoption procedures and visitor visas without permission to engage in lucrative activity for humanitarian reasons to the non-Mexican holder of that visa. They may do so if the visa holder has had their visitor or resident card stolen, lost or destroyed. Non-Mexicans must process their replacement request within the first thirty calendar days after the loss of the card.

The Immigration Institute (INM) shall establish in the General Administrative Provisions which will soon be published in the Mexican Official Gazette, the features, form and design of the cards, and other immigration documents.

The card that certifies the status of temporary resident stay may be valid for one, two, three or four years, starting from when the non-Mexican was given that particular status.

When the temporary resident obtains a work permit, the card certifying their status will have validity for as long as the job lasts.

The holder of the temporary resident card may, within thirty calendar days prior to its expiration date, request the visa’s renewal for up to a total of four years.

Children of foreign nationality under the age of three can only obtain a resident card with a validity of one year, until they are three years old.

The card certifying the status of temporary resident will give the holder the right to make multiple entries and exits from the country.

The permanent resident card will be valid for an indefinite term, but Non-Mexicans who are minors and older than three will have to renew their permanent resident card every four years until they are of legal age.

The card certifying the status of permanent resident will give the holder the right to make multiple entries and exits of the country and to maintain a work permit once they are of legal age.

A non-Mexican who is outside the country when their visa status expires, may enter the country with it up to fifty-five calendar days from its expiration. Within fifty-five calendar days, no penalty will be applied and the application for renewal must be submitted within five working days after admission into Mexico. Entry into Mexico will not be allowed for non-Mexicans holding a document that is more than fifty-five calendar days past its date of expiration.

Non-Mexicans in the possession of a temporary student resident card can obtain a work permit if they are doing postgraduate or advanced classes, or research.

The owners of a visa as visitors for humanitarian activities and permanent residents have an implicit work permit.

Temporary and permanent residents must notify the INM, within ninety calendar days following the occurrence, of any changes in marital status, nationality, residence or workplace.

Any visa applications that are pending on the date that these regulations go into effect shall be completed in accordance with the provisions in force at the time of the start of the application.

The immigration documents proving regular migration status of Non-Mexicans, which have been issued before these regulations go into effect, shall continue to have legal effect until their expiration. The one exception is the Non-immigrant Local Guest, whose visa must be replaced in accordance with the General Administrative Provisions issued by the INM that will be published in the Mexican Official Gazette.

New Rules

As you can see if you read all of the above, the rules for immigration into Mexico have changed fairly substantially and we believe it will take some time for the rules and the way they are applied to be ironed out. As of this writing (October 15, 2012), our contacts inside the INM have informed us that they are in training to understand how to implement and apply these new rules. There will be new forms, new computer procedures and new documents. We encourage you all to be patient.

Of course, if you need assistance with your new visa or a visa renewal, the project managers at Yucatan Expatriate Services are ready to assist you. Just write us at info@yucatanyes.com or call us at the number at the bottom of the website.

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Long in the tooth to be sure, but when you shuck it down to the cob it's about what we've been speculating. It will be intersting to see if those of us on FM3's with 4 years under our belts can move to Permant status immediately and of course what Aduana does about our vehicles.

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One interesting component is this: "the temporary resident visa will be valid for one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry. The applicant must apply for the resident card within the first thirty calendar days after their entry into Mexico. After 4 years with the temporary resident visa, the applicant can apply for the permanent resident visa".

And: "A non-Mexican who is outside the country when their visa status expires, may enter the country with it up to fifty-five calendar days from its expiration. Within fifty-five calendar days, no penalty will be applied and the application for renewal must be submitted within five working days after admission into Mexico. Entry into Mexico will not be allowed for non-Mexicans holding a document that is more than fifty-five calendar days past its date of expiration".

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Still much is up in the air and an important issue for many will be which classes of people will be allowed to keep a foreign plated vehicle.

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"The temporary resident visa will be valid for one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry. The permanent resident visa will be valid for one hundred and eighty calendar days with a single entry". "The holder of the temporary resident card may, within thirty calendar days prior to its expiration date, request the visa’s renewal for up to a total of four years. The permanent resident card will be valid for an indefinite term." These statements seem to be contradictory!

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Has the bar for income on the FM2 or Residente Permanente always been that high? Seems that would eliminate a fair number of people who are on SSI only. I'd bet on Aduana requiring MXN plates at least for Residente Permanente, it makes sense and it's a nice revenue enhancer.

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IF you go to the website in my original post and scroll down questions are being asked and the author answering as best she can. This may help all of us as this evolves.

Seems like fun times. Keep in mind Canada has been trying to update Immigration laws for years with nothing concrete except slapping visas for visitors from countries such as Mexico and the Romas. The US has talked immigration for a decade and nadda, zero, nothing. Yet, in the past 18 months Mexico passed the laws and received input from the UN regarding refugees, consulted other countries, expats and many branches of government and lawmakers. They recently, wrote the actual laws and now implementing them, again all within 18 months. This did this while having elections in every town, city, state and federally!!

We are allowed to live here legally proving minimal income, in most cases keep a foreign plated car and get free healthcare all while enjoying great weather, beautiful scenery and a lower cost of living. Viva Mexico!!! Try doing that in the US, Canada or most any other country.

I believe these will be the fees:

$3,130 for a single year

$4,690 for two years

$5,940 for three years

$7,040 for four years

Permanent resident will be 3,815 pesos

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I'm not sure where you came from or where you're living, but I can tell you that nearly $2k per month for permanent residents will preclude many US folks on SSI and "free" healthcare? Where do I go to get that? Cost of living here, electricity 4X the US, food depending isn't all that cheap, I don't eat out much, but I can eat fast food in the States for less, TV @$75/month isn't a deal, Internet @ $40 is maybe on par, poor water requires filters I never needed NOB, pressure pumps I never needed, propane a@$30/month isn't cheap, visa cost every year, mailbox every year, sorry, I'd have to disagree with your assumptions. The living cheap in Mexico train left the station a while back. And don't even get into buying any "luxury" item like electronics, tools etc. The other day I needed a small Dremel diamond cutting wheel and Home Depot had them $480mxd - I bought 2 on Amazon for $30 and had a friend NOB mail them to me. I don't know exactly what the "fee" structure you posted relates to, but it's not "cheap". Rent is a good deal, mostly because the owners pay almost no tax so they don't have to pass it along, the downside is no infrastructure, no street maintenance and under paid police with their hands out for mordida. But, I'll give you this, the weather is great and the scenery nice .

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Costs: Depends. Back in CA, if you owned a 500K home (and that would not be a palace in the S.F. Bay Area), and your property taxes were around 2.5%, you can figure out where a large chunk of your money would be going.

For half that or less, you can buy an equivalent or better house here and the taxes are wondrously low.

Fast food: the street stand food is probably more nutritious and cheaper.

If you don't mind "county hospital style" medical care, there's Seguro Popular. Out of pocket with regular care......very reasonable.

We've paid for two traffic tickets (both well deserved) in our nine years here.......and never paid mordida. If you got a ticket NOB, the cost was many times what it is here.

Household help? $35 dollars US. per hour for the Merry Maid type help.

Gardeners: same high cost

Yes, there are things to complain about, but the above matters aren't one of them.

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I'm not sure where you came from or where you're living, but I can tell you that nearly $2k per month for permanent residents will preclude many US folks on SSI and "free" healthcare? Where do I go to get that? Cost of living here, electricity 4X the US, food depending isn't all that cheap, I don't eat out much, but I can eat fast food in the States for less, TV @$75/month isn't a deal, Internet @ $40 is maybe on par, poor water requires filters I never needed NOB, pressure pumps I never needed, propane a@$30/month isn't cheap, visa cost every year, mailbox every year, sorry, I'd have to disagree with your assumptions. The living cheap in Mexico train left the station a while back. And don't even get into buying any "luxury" item like electronics, tools etc. The other day I needed a small Dremel diamond cutting wheel and Home Depot had them $480mxd - I bought 2 on Amazon for $30 and had a friend NOB mail them to me. I don't know exactly what the "fee" structure you posted relates to, but it's not "cheap". Rent is a good deal, mostly because the owners pay almost no tax so they don't have to pass it along, the downside is no infrastructure, no street maintenance and under paid police with their hands out for mordida. But, I'll give you this, the weather is great and the scenery nice .

Wow!! Why do you stay??

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Property taxes $150

Electricity for family of 3 is 280 p every 2 months ... 3 bedroom home, 2 baths, washer and dryer (gas for heating the dryer), TelMex Internet and phone including 100 minutes national long distance $33 (389 p); propane $25; water $17; a week of fruits and vegetables at local markets (not gringo markets) $20 a week max. Car insurance on NOB plated car $30 / month, car registration $0.

Rent a nice FURNISHED home for $700.

Typical meal out $8 to $13.

TV only high if you have Shaw etc but Telecable is much less.

Gasoline for a car is about 83 cents a liter. Toronto $1.35 a liter and US getting to $4 a gallon.

Where I come from in Ontario, Canada property taxes are $4500 and up; heating and / or air conditioning needed every month of the year and a meal for 2 at say Applebee's / Swiss Chalet etc with tax and tip and no alcohol is $50 plus. Water, phone, Internet, natural gas all more.

No comparison and for one owning a home I believe close to half the cost. Plus outside every day providing a healthier life style.

Every time friends return home for the summer or a vacation from their home in Mexico their first comment is how expensive it is NOB.

Electronics have dropped here significantly. At Mega 42" LED Sony TV is 8800 p including 16% tax. Liverpool has several sales a year. This past weekend every computer and every item in store was 25% off and the price including tax for electronics was on a par with most anything NOB.

I will agree majority of homes are overpriced as I know one can be built for $42 to $60 a sq ft of enclosed space plus land whereas many are paying $100 a sq ft and they include covered patios etc in that price which is wayyyyy to much vs replacement costs.

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Good question, I'm currently doing a cost/benefit analysis that will be completed next month and then we'll see. But mainly I get tired of people posting wildly inaccurate fairy tails on forums and then people come down here all stary eyed and I host folks from time to time and I have to explain to them the reality of MX. If you want to live the life of the average working Mexican then yes, it can be rather inexpensive, but who among us does that? I can live in a run down trailer house in backwater MS, LA, TX etc. cheap, in fact there I get food stamps, free phone etc. and at the moment at least, "free" healthcare, but I'm not about to do that and I'd be willing to bet 98% of folks on this forum won't either.

A great advertisement for NOT living in CA I'd say, I left there in 1965, never looked back. I haven't had a ticket since 1982, so guess I'm just plain cheap, never needed or had "help" NOB, only here because it's in my rent, no choice. As far as "quality" houses, there's nothing in them to justify the costs here. Very few of the things we need NOB are included here, but the costs are still up there. I've built a couple of houses and was just looking at a total deconstruction of one NOB the last couple of weeks so I can quote you costs.

Back to the subject at hand, I don't see a lot of change, I don't see any laurel leaves being thrown in our paths, so we'll see as it unfolds.

Yes, Canadians and folks from CA think it's cheap here, they come from totally skewed economies.

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In reading the last post, it seems there are quite a few places the poster wouldn't live.

If you want to economize and hold expenses down, you have to really watch where the money goes and spend wisely.

If you compare apples to apples and oranges to oranges, I think you will find it much cheaper in the Lake Chapala area than NOB.

Just try on heating and air conditioning, property taxes, and eating out for starters and see where the score is. How long can one eat at McDonalds NOB when fast food Mexican style is so much cheaper and the good restaurants locally that aren't that much more expensive.

This is just covering food and shelter, the basics, and then there is the service industry of plumbers, electricians, auto mechanics, construction workers, medical service people, etc, etc, and add that score up and I think you would have to back down from this cost of living hangup you have.

From your previous posts, I have noticed a disaffection for many things Mexican that are troubling to you, so it might just be a compilation of all these matters.

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IF you go to the website in my original post and scroll down questions are being asked and the author answering as best she can. This may help all of us as this evolves.

Seems like fun times. Keep in mind Canada has been trying to update Immigration laws for years with nothing concrete except slapping visas for visitors from countries such as Mexico and the Romas. The US has talked immigration for a decade and nadda, zero, nothing. Yet, in the past 18 months Mexico passed the laws and received input from the UN regarding refugees, consulted other countries, expats and many branches of government and lawmakers. They recently, wrote the actual laws and now implementing them, again all within 18 months. This did this while having elections in every town, city, state and federally!!

We are allowed to live here legally proving minimal income, in most cases keep a foreign plated car and get free healthcare all while enjoying great weather, beautiful scenery and a lower cost of living. Viva Mexico!!! Try doing that in the US, Canada or most any other country.

I believe these will be the fees:

$3,130 for a single year

$4,690 for two years

$5,940 for three years

$7,040 for four years

Permanent resident will be 3,815 pesos

Are these fees for an FM2 or FM3if there is such a thing anymore?

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I'm not sure where you came from or where you're living, but I can tell you that nearly $2k per month for permanent residents will preclude many US folks on SSI and "free" healthcare? Where do I go to get that? Cost of living here, electricity 4X the US, food depending isn't all that cheap, I don't eat out much, but I can eat fast food in the States for less, TV @$75/month isn't a deal, Internet @ $40 is maybe on par, poor water requires filters I never needed NOB, pressure pumps I never needed, propane a@$30/month isn't cheap, visa cost every year, mailbox every year, sorry, I'd have to disagree with your assumptions. The living cheap in Mexico train left the station a while back. And don't even get into buying any "luxury" item like electronics, tools etc. The other day I needed a small Dremel diamond cutting wheel and Home Depot had them $480mxd - I bought 2 on Amazon for $30 and had a friend NOB mail them to me. I don't know exactly what the "fee" structure you posted relates to, but it's not "cheap". Rent is a good deal, mostly because the owners pay almost no tax so they don't have to pass it along, the downside is no infrastructure, no street maintenance and under paid police with their hands out for mordida. But, I'll give you this, the weather is great and the scenery nice .

I'm glad that we've found a less expensive part of Mexico and left behind a more expensive part of the USA. In Vermont, our electric bill was much higher than here. We just paid our two months today and it was only 528 pesos. We refill the propane tank every three months; this costs us about 800 pesos to fill the tank. If we don't dine at the expensive restaurants, we can eat well pretty cheaply. In fact, we can get a great taco dinner at our neighbor's stand for 48 pesos for both of us. Our taxes were close to $5,000 US a year. We lived on a dirt road, had our own well water, and two local police officers. I could go on, but I did want to point out that not all of the USA has a lower cost of living than here. We are so grateful to be here. I do hope that the new laws take into consideration property owned as part of the expected income. Otherwise, like many we'd be cutting it very close.

Carol

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Are these fees for an FM2 or FM3if there is such a thing anymore?

There will not longer be FM-2/3 (actually do not exist now but we all gravitate to the terminology). But replacing them is a Temporary Resident and you will be able to pay for 1 to 4 years all at once. On the multiple years that is a big saving vs paying one year at a time. And, going through the process of applying each year will be gone.

The Permanent Resident I believe replaces Inmigrado and once you have that visa you are done with needing another visa. Plus you can work with a Permanent Resident visa.

After the dust settles the Immigration offices should need less staff as their workload will be significantly reduced.

My visa expires Nov 13 and will feel like a guinea pig but hopefully will become a Permanent Resident based on time and being married to an awesome Mexican lady.

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For us, the $64 question is whether we'll be able to go onto Residente Permanente after 5 years on FM3's, what that might cost and what the requirements might be. Even if we have to stay on Residente Temporal, it appears we can opt to get longer visas and cut down on the need to get new ones every year. That will be a nice change all by itself.

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Mainecoons I believe the answer is "yes". This will be a huge relief. Next question is what will be Aduana's position on a NOB plated car?

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I'm not sure where you came from or where you're living, but I can tell you that nearly $2k per month for permanent residents will preclude many US folks on SSI and "free" healthcare? Where do I go to get that? Cost of living here, electricity 4X the US, food depending isn't all that cheap, I don't eat out much, but I can eat fast food in the States for less, TV @$75/month isn't a deal, Internet @ $40 is maybe on par, poor water requires filters I never needed NOB, pressure pumps I never needed, propane a@$30/month isn't cheap, visa cost every year, mailbox every year, sorry, I'd have to disagree with your assumptions. The living cheap in Mexico train left the station a while back. And don't even get into buying any "luxury" item like electronics, tools etc. The other day I needed a small Dremel diamond cutting wheel and Home Depot had them $480mxd - I bought 2 on Amazon for $30 and had a friend NOB mail them to me. I don't know exactly what the "fee" structure you posted relates to, but it's not "cheap". Rent is a good deal, mostly because the owners pay almost no tax so they don't have to pass it along, the downside is no infrastructure, no street maintenance and under paid police with their hands out for mordida. But, I'll give you this, the weather is great and the scenery nice .

I totally agree with giltner This area is not cheap anymore.Every year prices keep on creeping up. Weather great, scenery nice. I was talking to the owner of a gallery in Ajijic, Paola de Waterlott ( excuse me if I have the name misspell) and she told me things are cheap here until you get sick and no time to go to the USA. Savings can be depleted very fast.

My husband and I had been paying Medicare while living here and now that we are going back I know what a wise decision we made. We sold our house, will miss the area but we can live as cheap in the USA as here. It all depends on the area. Food is more but there are ways to find good bargains. Electricity is higher but reliable. We are going to explore alternatives for electricity. Cloth is better quality and cheaper and thrift shops are great. We don't eat out much, I cook a lot, but the selection I could find in Supermarkets will make my task easier. But most important we are going to be much closer to our family.

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I totally agree with giltner This area is not cheap anymore.Every year prices keep on creeping up. Weather great, scenery nice. I was talking to the owner of a gallery in Ajijic, Paola de Waterlott ( excuse me if I have the name misspell) and she told me things are cheap here until you get sick and no time to go to the USA. Savings can be depleted very fast.

My husband and I had been paying Medicare while living here and now that we are going back I know what a wise decision we made. We sold our house, will miss the area but we can live as cheap in the USA as here. It all depends on the area. Food is more but there are ways to find good bargains. Electricity is higher but reliable. We are going to explore alternatives for electricity. Cloth is better quality and cheaper and thrift shops are great. We don't eat out much, I cook a lot, but the selection I could find in Supermarkets will make my task easier. But most important we are going to be much closer to our family.

Carib, the best of luck to you, as long as you are happy, that is what matters !

Best regards,

Rony

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Cheap is relative. This is a resort area renowned for its climate and convenient to everything location. As such, it is comparable to, say San Clemente CA where my brother lives, or to PV or Cancun in Mexico. It is not comparable to Podunk, Alabama or Podunko, MX.

When you look at it that way, it is really cheap. For example the house we live in would sell for 3 million or more where my brother lives and the taxes on it would be 30K per year. He rents an 1100 square foot town house for $2400 per month. It is darned hard to find any rental here that expensive. To rent a house where he lives comparable to many $1000 rentals here, you'd pay $4K per month there. Gas is 30 percent more and you burn a lot of it just trying to get around locally, whereas we use a few liters or walk.

Electric here is no bargain but we neither heat nor cool so we don't use a lot of it. And one has the option here to provide most or all of your power consumption with solar power. Ditto for hot water. Too much fog there to rely on it and he definitely has to heat in the winter.

Food--wowza! But wine is cheap! :)

Forget about hiring a maid or gardener--between the hourly cost and wading through all the government BS, it is simply prohibitive. Not here. Even though the local domestic help is paid well above the general levels around Mexico, it is still affordable and simple to have the help we need.

Dentists? Doctors? Good and affordable. It is a real shock to visit either and they take the time to really talk to you and work with you. By comparison, you feel like a piece of meat with the average doctor or dentist NOB.

No, by general Mexico standards, this place is not cheap. But start comparing to other Mexican resorts, or San Miguel, and it beats all of them hands down. And one does have the option to live in many non-resort Mexican areas where the weather is still good and the living is really cheap.

At least in the central part of Mexico, Podunk Mexico sure beats the pants off of Podunk anywhere else.

There are some things here that are simply not available in car-dependent NOB, such as our walk everywhere village life style. Coming from Albuquerque, a really nice place but with a much more extreme climate and high car dependency, the village lifestyle is a wonderful benefit that you can't put a dollar sign on.

We love it here, can you tell? :)

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Some interesting stuff. I'm concerned about the car angle and whether or not the new rules would apply to Baja. Rosarita could be looking better to me, depending. I can't believe the MX gob is doing this to make it cheaper for expats to live here They are looking for income. And being crafty, but not crafty enough, they will work the foreigners rather than tax the cartels. The path of the least resistance.

As for comparisons to NOB costs vs MX costs, not one size fits all. I can live just about as cheaply in my place in CA as I can here--of course I'm out of the big cities. Given the huge depreciation of houses and the glut of short sales, many homes in CA are a bargain. What went for $500K three years ago, is half that now. Roughly USD monthly costs for me: Comcast, $60-includes magic jack phone, electric $40, water $40, property taxes $90, includes add-ons, schools, fire, police, garbage. Meat is cheaper than here, but is going up because of the drought, Vegetables more expensive, Gas more expensive (CA has it's own special price due to environmental regulations).. Electronics, tools, and appliances much cheaper. And so far when you call the sheriff, someone shows up. The bad news: winter sucks. I can spend about $500 on wood each winter, That goes to my gardener, down here. So it evens out, I guess. I don't know about the rest of the country or Canada.

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