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viejomalogato

Mexican Citizenship

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That was under the old rules, the $64 question is what the new rules will be. A year later, the question remains. The conventional wisdom I've heard about this is that the new rules will come out after the new government takes over.

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Rex all I can tell you is that the Mexican consulate told me in Atlanta GA. that I could become a Mexican citizen after I have lived in Mexico for two years. This was about 1 1/2 years ago. There is a good chance they don't know what they are talking about.

http://www.rollybroo...e_to_mexico.htm

If your husband is a Mexican citizen

If you are married to a Mexican who is employed in México, you can get an FM2 Inmigrante Familiares without having to show an income from outside México. Go to your local INM office to get instructions.

You will need your birth certificate with an apostille and your marriage certificate. If you were married outside México, your certificate will need an apostille and should be registered at city hall before going to INM.

After living in México for two years with this visa, you can apply for citizenship if you wish.

There are a few things that should be known about México, Whenever a Federal law is passed here, it does not automatically apply in every state. Instead of that, it is sent to the governors of all 32 states, they may then choose to send it to their state legislatures for passage, or passage with amendments.

This is why it is so important to wait until you are in the place where you plan to live, to find out what the local requirements for anything are. Do not accept anything someone says is the law where they live, as applying to you, until you find out what is required where you plan to live.

Until they changed the visas a few years ago, a person had to hold a FM3 visa for 5 years, before moving up to a FM2 visa. The names have changed, but the classifications are now very similar. Since you were evidently entitled to go directly to a FM2, perhaps that would have entitled you to become a citizen in 2 years. I had the same rights after 2 years with my first FM3, but a very incompetent clerk in México City threw me out.

Mi late Mexican wife had never worked in the formal economy here. I had to prove that I had enough income to support us both, in order for her to return to live in her own country.

Dual citizenship is not encouraged by The US State Department, however there is no bar to it. The oath a person takes to renounce all other citizenship’s when becoming a Mexican citizen means nothing to The US government.

The only thing the US Government provides for a US citizen in this country, is to see that you are treated according to Mexican law if you get in trouble. They will not provide you with a lawyer, or any funds for any legal assistance you may need. In other words, you are on your own down here anyway.

The only way a person may terminate their US citizenship is to appear before a US Ambassador, or consul in a foreign country, and formally renounce it. I have read that it is fairly easy to regain US citizenship if it was legally acquired by birth or otherwise, if desired though.

Rex

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I read through the new law in its entirety and although it's been a few months since I did so, I think you will all like it if and when it is implemented. As a general rule, whenever previous laws were folded together or new ones created, they always chose the immigrant friendly side of the argument. To me the federal government wants ex-pats here spending money. At any time you can get "permanent resident" status that puts you on track for citizenship after 2-5 years. I can't remember if it mentions knowledge of Spanish, maybe that is a regulatory detail.

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I read through the new law in its entirety and although it's been a few months since I did so, I think you will all like it if and when it is implemented. As a general rule, whenever previous laws were folded together or new ones created, they always chose the immigrant friendly side of the argument. To me the federal government wants ex-pats here spending money. At any time you can get "permanent resident" status that puts you on track for citizenship after 2-5 years. I can't remember if it mentions knowledge of Spanish, maybe that is a regulatory detail.

This Federal law, as well as many others, are implemented on a local level. The in-charge local folks tend to interpret the Federal law however they choose. For example, Cabreado mentions that ANY TIME you can get "permanent resident" status that puts you on track for citizenship within 2-5 years. That may be true in some local offices, but I assure you that it has not been true in Morelia, Michoacán. In Morelia, 5 years of FM-3 status must be followed by 5 years of FM-2 status, unless special circumstances exist. Those circumstances include the foreigner being married to a Mexican, in which case the FM-2 status is lowered to 2 years.

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Hi More Liana. Maybe I wasn't clear, I was talking to the new law. I have no idea how it will be implemented. But when you use the past perfect tense, you don't seem to be speaking of the new law, or am I mistaken?

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Here, they were allowing people to go FM2 right off and Immigrado after 5 years of FM2. However, some who have studied the new law think the distinction between FM2 and 3 will disappear and those who have 5 years of FM3 MIGHT (please note, wild speculation at this point) be able to go Immigrado immediately.

We just won't know until the new regs come down.

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Hi More Liana. Maybe I wasn't clear, I was talking to the new law. I have no idea how it will be implemented. But when you use the past perfect tense, you don't seem to be speaking of the new law, or am I mistaken?

All I'm saying is that Federal law is implemented in different ways depending on the folks in charge of the individual INM offices. The example of Morelia's implementation of the 'new' law--the law theoretically in place since May 2010--was different from the implementation in other venues. Morelia was just an example of how local rule trumps Federal law.

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