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viejomalogato

Mexican Citizenship

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I've had fleeting moments of wondering about becoming a citizen of Mexico. Being an x-pat of the USA, I need to know if there are any negatives for this action, or positives for that matter. Not having any desire or motivation for returning there, it seems pointless to continue the charade of not doing so.

How does the United States government feel about dual citizinship ?

How does this effect ones auto insurance ?

Can one vote in elections, or even just voice opinions ?

For those who have gone through this procedure, I would appreciate any information you may feel important

Thank you

R.

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You will want to read this document from the US State Department. It will reassure you that you are allowed to retain both your USA citizenship and Mexican citizenship. http://travel.state.gov/travel/cis_pa_tw/cis/cis_1753.html

You will, if you wish, have two passports--one from the USA and the other from Mexico. You will be entitled to a credencial--the Mexican voter ID card--and you can vote in both Mexican elections AND USA elections as long as you are registered in both countries. Upon acquiring Mexican citizenship, you can apply for both the Mexican voter credencial and a Mexican passport. You will need the <i>credencial as your Mexican identification, but the Mexican passport is optional.

If you plan to travel outside Mexico, especially to the USA, you will have to have a Mexican passport. To leave Mexico by air, you get an FME form for Mexican citizens at airport immigration, fill it out, and turn it in to INM. When you enter the USA, you enter using your USA passport. When you leave the USA, you leave using your USA passport. When you re-enter Mexico, you enter using your Mexican passport and turn in the remaining half of your FME. It's very simple.

When you are sworn in as a Mexican citizen, you are required to sign a paper saying that WHILE YOU ARE IN MEXICO you give up the right to services from the US Embassy. This is no way affects your actual US citizenship, for example for purposes of receiving Social Security, or for any other purpose.

I became a Mexican citizen quite a few years ago. I am very proud that I made the decision and I have experienced nothing but good.

Others may have different opinions, of course, but I speak from personal experience.

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Does anyone know the costs involved and if the Spanish test is waived for those over a certain age.

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It costs approximately $4200MN and takes about three months ONCE IT HAS BEEN APPROVED. Receiving approval can take quite a while. Mine took 18 months total.

Read here: http://www.sre.gob.mx/index.php/carta-de-naturalizacion-por-residencia

The website does not mention the Spanish test.

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I do not think the test is being waved everywhere. I was told I should study for it and I am over 65.

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If you are 60 or over you no longer have to take the test or speak Spanish. You must have had an FM2 for at least 5 years before applying.. With the new INM classifications I don't know what the standard will be.

The paper we were asked to sign said that we will rescind any other citizenship.

If you have no familial ties to Mexico you cannot hold dual citizenship in Mexico. If you as a Mexican citizen used your American passport here in Mexico for identification in some transaction or any other legal papers from another country,, your Mexican citizenship could be rescinded.

Many changes in pursuing citizenship changed during this administration. With a new administration set to take office in a few months there could be other changes. Nothing is ever set in stone.

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The SRE lawyer in Guadalajara a month ago. She may have been joking but she told me to study for the test.. will find out soon enough.

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Shira wrote, "If you have no familial ties to Mexico you cannot hold dual citizenship in Mexico."

That is incorrect. Please read the SRE website regarding the many reasons for being granted citizenship. The link is in my second post on this thread.

Shira also stated, "You must have had an FM2 for at least 5 years before applying." That is also incorrect in many instances. As another poster stated, if you are married to a Mexican, you can apply after holding an FM-2 for two years. There are many other reasons why it is possible to apply sooner than five years. Please read the SRE website.

"The test" does not refer to a Spanish test--it refers to a general knowledge of all things Mexican test. That test applies regardless of age.

The Spanish test MAY be waived in Jalisco if the applicant is over 60, but it is not waived everywhere. And it may only be waived in certain places in Jalisco. There is no mention of a specific Spanish-language test on the SRE website. You will need to ask in person either before or at the time you apply for citizenship.

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The head of naturalization in Guadalajara was the one who told us we could not have dual citizenship in Mexico if we had no familial ties.

Colima where you got your citizenship was playing by different rules at that time than Guadalajara.. Our paper that we signed did not allow us dual citizenship. We had to renounce any other existing citizenship.

As I stated on my post, things changed during the last 6 years and will probably change again with the new administration. The only thing consistent here is that itis inconsistent.

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Are there courses locally where one can study for citizenship? If the last interpretation of the new rules is correct, we might qualify to apply soon.

I'm also thinking this is one of those things where a facilitator/guide would be most useful and worth the expense.

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A study guide is available via the link provided by More Liana. They also refer you to a specific book.

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Shira, the paper that you signed (and that I also signed) "renouncing" other citizenships is for purposes of living in Mexico ONLY. As far as the USA is concerned, you and I are still citizens in good standing. I talked about this in my first post in this thread: "When you are sworn in as a Mexican citizen, you are required to sign a paper saying that WHILE YOU ARE IN MEXICO you give up the right to services from the US Embassy. This is no way affects your actual US citizenship, for example for purposes of receiving Social Security, or for any other purpose."

Please read the State Department website, especially what it says about renouncing US citizenship.

For purposes of continuing to hold a US passport, receiving Social Security payments, Medicare eligibility, VA benefits and in *every other respect*, you are a full-fledged US citizen. Even though you are a Mexican citizen, you can continue use your USA passport as official identification in every country of the world EXCEPT MEXICO. When you are in Mexico, you are a Mexican citizen only.

This is true of the entire República mexicana. It is not a rule that depends on either where in Mexico you live or where (or when) you receive(d) citizenship.

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More Liana that is not what our paper said. The person I have discussed it with recently was the head of naturalization not that long ago. What you are describing is what he told us to do to so as not to jeapordize our Mexican citizenship.

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If you are married to a Mexican citizen you can become one in two years.

Not anymore. Several years ago, you could become a Mexican citizen if your spouse was a Mexican citizen and you had held a FM 3 Visa for two years. That was changed 4 or 5 years ago, and you then had to hold a FM2 Visa for 2 years.

My Mexican wife died about 18 months ago. I had to notify Mexican immigration that I was no longer familiar within 30 days. I had to pay a fine, as I didn't know about that requirement. Who does? I also had to pay for, and get a new visa card. I was on my second or third year of having a new visa card. I was told I was starting over now, and I cannot apply for Mexican citizenship for another 4 years.

I have lost interest now. I see no advantage to having a Mexican passport for me, except when crossing the border. I have a cuñado that is a dual citizen, He was born in Texas with a Mexican-American father, and a Mexican mother. When he was16 years old and in in high school in México City, The school somehow learned that he was not a Mexican citizen, and they notified the Mexican immigration service. The immigration service gave him one week to leave the country, or he would be deported.

He was sent to live with an uncle in Alaska, that was a hard time for him, as he was just starting to learn to speak English when he had to enroll in an American high school. That is how I met my late Mexican wife, She was up there visiting that same uncle, my wife was a very fluent English speaker.

He was able to “regain” his Mexican citizenship because of his Mexican mother a few years ago, He has lived in The US for about 44 years now. He is as American as they come. He is also as Mexican as they come. He plans to retire in México in a very few years. He is more comfortable speaking English now, but of course he is still a very fluent Spanish speaker.

Crossing the border with both passports is no problem for him now. He can come and go as often as he wants to now.

For me, phooey on it.

Rex

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Rex all I can tell you is that the Mexican consulate told me in Atlanta GA. that I could become a Mexican citizen after I have lived in Mexico for two years. This was about 1 1/2 years ago. There is a good chance they don't know what they are talking about.

http://www.rollybroo...e_to_mexico.htm

If your husband is a Mexican citizen

If you are married to a Mexican who is employed in México, you can get an FM2 Inmigrante Familiares without having to show an income from outside México. Go to your local INM office to get instructions.

You will need your birth certificate with an apostille and your marriage certificate. If you were married outside México, your certificate will need an apostille and should be registered at city hall before going to INM.

After living in México for two years with this visa, you can apply for citizenship if you wish.

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I don't think I got an answer as to whether live citizenship courses are offered locally. I am aware of the manual on the web site ML posted, however what I want to know is whether anyone is offering taught courses for prospective citizens, thanks.

This is a very useful and informative thread, thanks to viejo for starting it!

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If the last interpretation of the new rules is correct, we might qualify to apply soon.

Why do you think you might qualify to apply soon? I'm in my second year Inmigrante (formerly FM2) and just assume I'll have to wait until I've completed the five years.

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A while back, Spencer (Intercasa) posted an interim analysis of the law that suggested that either FM2 or FM3 time might be counted towards citizenship in the future.

At this point in time, it is a by guess and by golly but we want to get prepared in case this actually happens.

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There seems to be a lot of "That was then, but this is now" relative to this subject. It gets real fuzzy sometimes.

I wonder what are the tax implications involved in this process?

Rufus

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how does citzenship affect your income taxes,

if world wide income treated differently when you become a citizen,

social security income and pension from US,

as resident in not taxable in mexico, does thst chsngr when youare a citizen of mexico

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how does citzenship affect your income taxes,

as resident in not taxable in mexico, does thst chsngr when youare a citizen of mexico

We are all suppose to report world wide income in Mexico citizen or simply a full time resident. It is just that they have not the means to track us.

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We met with a lawyer 6 months ago and we are in our 5th year of our FM2, he said this next year we have to let our FM2's expire and then apply for Immigrado. When we renewed our FM2 I also asked the lady at immigration and she said the same thing. That we had to have our FM2 for 5 years and then let it expire for 2 days 2 weeks it didn't matter, then we could apply for Immigrado.

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