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@bennie2 - Thanks for the advice.  I only responded because I was half asleep and caught completely off-guard.  Well, that and he absolutely would not stop shouting and ringing my doorbell, and my dogs were going nuts.  I would like to know, if you're aware, of what local or regional Bonafont distributorship he operates out of.  I really want someone in charge to sit this reject down and read him the riot act (or whatever else will discourage him from EVER trying this again).  Anyway, thanks again, and I'd really be grateful any specific info you have on contacting Bonafont locally.

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Guest bennie2

sharpdale, the drivers change companies just like the gas people do. @ the time i was using "katya" in chapala (not a company called bonafont). in general its best just to make a change & let it go. @ one time katya was owned by an american. he did fire people when therewas a problem. he must of sold the comp or just wasnt around. (so i couldnt report the lunatic). is this the man who sometimes shows up w/another guy? sometimes w/a child? if you want the cell number of my driver let me know. always best to deal directly w/the driver, as you know who will show up. 

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I have to respectfully disagree with Tio Bob.  A few years ago I ran a water business delivering improved water into your own jug.  At the time there was research that showed that drinking reverse osmosis water, or distilled water, over a long period can leach minerals out of our bones.  In Israel, where almost all water is treated, they add a small amount of the water back into the output water to solve this problem.

I am not saying not to drink reverse osmosis water; we do.  We feel that is better than drinking the tapwater here.  But be sure to have your bone density checked and, if it is not as dense as you would like, be sure to mention to your Dr. that you are drinking RO water.

Rick

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I had my electrician install a simple on/off switch for my doorbell due to similar problems mentioned above. When I am expecting someone, I turn switch on. When I am not, I turn switch off. I can ignore the shouting and banging, but that buzzer of a doorbell was my big problem. Not any more.

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Just moved into a rental home in Ajijic and some large bottle water.  Have contaners for Bonafont but cannot find a local number to call them.  HELP

jkjoking13@yahoo.com

661 527 6512

Jerald Koenig 

 

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15 minutes ago, markoe said:

Just moved into a rental home in Ajijic and some large bottle water.  Have contaners for Bonafont but cannot find a local number to call them.  HELP

jkjoking13@yahoo.com

661 527 6512

Jerald Koenig 

 

Jerald, you've responded to a several-years-old thread.  You might want to start a new thread, with your question, to get more attention and answers.

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The number I have is for Jorge- delivers on Mondays- 5515102855. 

I just moved and tried to get him for last Monday, no luck. Hope I suggest next Monday

I was told he speaks some English, but he only spoke Spanish when I called last week.

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On ‎4‎/‎22‎/‎2012 at 10:00 AM, Floradude said:

You should be getting the minerals you need from food and vitamins with minerals. Water is H2O. I would prefer my water be as pure as possible although I know some minerals, etc. are to be expected.

Agree, we have had reverse osmosis for 11 years . We get what we need in other foods or drinks. If you can afford one ...no more big bottles ever.

 

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A little off topic, perhaps, but very interesting technology. You could make your own drinking water straight out of your garden hose if you have room on your Mirador... if the tech becomes available soon. As much sun as we get, it should be very practical, too.

Each structure costs less than two US cents to make and the rose-shaped solar steamer is now capable of producing over half a US gallon (1.9 liters) of purified water per hour, per square meter (10.7 sq ft) of material.
 
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A bouquet of the rose-inspired (or actually tulip-inspired) solar steamers(Credit: Cockrell School of Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin)
 
"Solar steaming" is an eco-friendly form of water purification in which sunlight is used to heat tainted water, turning it to steam which condenses back into liquid. That clean liquid is then collected as drinking water. A new system offers improved performance, and it copies the structure of the rose flower.
 

Led by Assoc. Prof. Donglei (Emma) Fan, a team from The University of Texas at Austin started with round pieces of paper that were coated with a black polymer known as polypyrrole – it's particularly good at converting solar light into heat. Those papers were initially just placed flat on the ground in the sunlight, where they showed promise for solar steaming, although they weren't efficient enough for practical use.

Inspired by a book she had read called The Black Tulip, Fan proceeded to try placing multiple papers together in a rose petal-like arrangement, contained within a glass jar. Tainted water was then drawn up into them through a stem-like tube that extended down into a vessel below.

Inline image
 
It was found that this setup allowed more sunlight to hit the polypyrrole, as light that wasn't absorbed by one paper got reflected onto another. Additionally, the surface area for water vapor dissipation was increased.
 

As a result, the rose-shaped solar steamer is now capable of producing over half a US gallon (1.9 liters) of purified water per hour, per square meter (10.7 sq ft) of material. Any heavy metals or bacteria present in polluted water get left behind when it turns to steam, along with any salt present in seawater.

The technology is cheap, too, as each structure costs less than two US cents to make. By contrast, the researchers state that other solar steaming systems tend to be costly, bulky, and produce comparatively small amounts of clean water.

"Our rational design and low-cost fabrication of 3D origami photothermal materials represents a first-of-its-kind portable low-pressure solar-steaming-collection system," says PhD candidate Weigu Li, lead author of a paper on the study. "This could inspire new paradigms of solar-steaming technologies in clean water production for individuals and homes."

The paper was recently published in the journal Advanced Materials.

 
 

 

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