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What make of cars can be nationalized in Mexico

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I did a google search but couldn't find a real answer. I own a 2004 Mitsubishi Lancer and I would like to know if this is a make of car that can be nationalized in Mexico.

Muchas gracias.

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i have no idea..... the only thing i do know is that it comes down to what letters your vin # has. if your vin number has a specific letter, it will never be allowed to be nationalized.

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Cars part of NAFTA. You need to look at your car's VIN number as the make doesn't always tell the story as some Hondas are made in the US, VWs in Mexico, etc.

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Cars part of NAFTA. You need to look at your car's VIN number as the make doesn't always tell the story as some Hondas are made in the US, VWs in Mexico, etc.

I was told that VIN (serial number) starting with the following number indicates where the vehicle was manufactured:

1) USA

2) Canada

3) Mexico

As Intercasa points out only NFATA vehicles (manuafactured in USA, Canada & Mexico) may qualify.

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Sorry, not a NAFTA-country built car.

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my understanding the Honda Fit I bought in the u.s. has a J, for Japan, a Fit bought in Mexico... has a B for Brazil. Mine can't be nationalizd... or so i've been told.

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my understanding the Honda Fit I bought in the u.s. has a J, for Japan, a Fit bought in Mexico... has a B for Brazil. Mine can't be nationalizd... or so i've been told.

It has been suggested to me that my J for Japan Toyota may be eligible for nationalisation but at a different, and higher, rate of duty than those vehicles manufactured in Nafta countries. I can't seem to get a definite answer on this as the rules are in a state of flux. Anyone have any light to shed?

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All you have to do is look at the first position of the VIN. The numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 & 5 are reserved of vehicles considered to have been manufactured in NAFTA countries. 1, 4 & 5 for the States, 3 for Mexico and 2 for Canada.

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I wonder the same thing. I have a Nissan X Trail that was made in Japan. The same vehicle is made in Mexico. It is common on the roads here and it seems about half the Mexican plated ones are made in Japan and the other half made in Mexico so it must be readily imported. I wonder if I paid a bit extra if I could get mine nationalized. So many of the rules here aren't black and white but shades of grey.

It has been suggested to me that my J for Japan Toyota may be eligible for nationalisation but at a different, and higher, rate of duty than those vehicles manufactured in Nafta countries. I can't seem to get a definite answer on this as the rules are in a state of flux. Anyone have any light to shed?

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I have the same situation with a Nissan Pathfinder, made in Japan and purchased in the USA. If it had been made in the Aguascalientes Nissan plant, in Mexico, it could be imported. In fact, had it been built in Japan but imported by a Nissan distributor and sold by a Nissan dealer in Mexico; no problem, as it was already imported under different rules.

Our Smart car was built in France by Mercedes Benz, imported and sold to me by a Mexican Mercedes Benz dealer in Guadalajara, registered in Jalisco without any difficulty or added cost; in fact, less than if purchased in the USA.

So: Different rules for individuals vs. distributors & dealers located in Mexico. Individuals get to pay, pay, pay.

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I wonder how they would know whether or not a Nissan distributor had imported it into Mexico as the VIN would still start with a J. Would the Nissan distributor put some kind of tag on it?

I have the same situation with a Nissan Pathfinder, made in Japan and purchased in the USA. If it had been made in the Aguascalientes Nissan plant, in Mexico, it could be imported. In fact, had it been built in Japan but imported by a Nissan distributor and sold by a Nissan dealer in Mexico; no problem, as it was already imported under different rules.

Our Smart car was built in France by Mercedes Benz, imported and sold to me by a Mexican Mercedes Benz dealer in Guadalajara, registered in Jalisco without any difficulty or added cost; in fact, less than if purchased in the USA.

So: Different rules for individuals vs. distributors & dealers located in Mexico. Individuals get to pay, pay, pay.

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That's a moot point and the question is already answered, above. If a vehicle is imported by a distributor and sold by a Mexican dealer, it is already imported and already registered in a Mexican state. It's VIN will still indicate the country of manufacture, be it a number or a J, or a W, etc. It will remain a Mexican plated vehicle.

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If what I understand is correct, the make of your car is not the only issue. Doesn't a car have to be exactly 10 years old to be nationalized? The OP's 2004 car wouldn't be eligible for nationalization until 2014 if that is the case.

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this is an important topic..... i was speaking to my neighbor and since their vehicle was made in japan, they will have to drive it out of mexico in time.

for those that plan to live in mexico, you should be aware of the vehicle your moving to mexico since it will become a problem having to drive it back and purchase another vehicle to bring down.

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There is a step down of sorts. I nationalized my 2003 car this year, and every 3 years they will step down or let you nationalize cars 2 years newer. For example, last year, 2010 you could only do cars 10 years old and older, this year 2011 8 years old and older, 2014 6 years old and older, etc.

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It isn't moot. I see possibilities there.

That's a moot point and the question is already answered, above. If a vehicle is imported by a distributor and sold by a Mexican dealer, it is already imported and already registered in a Mexican state. It's VIN will still indicate the country of manufacture, be it a number or a J, or a W, etc. It will remain a Mexican plated vehicle.

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Please tell us; don't keep those 'possibilities' a secret.

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Please tell us; don't keep those 'possibilities' a secret.

It was hinted to me that it might be "possible" for a dealer to register a foreign car as Mexican by including it in his regular inventory importation and issuing a receipt for its "purchase". This was for an unmentioned price and obviously fishy. I'm hoping for an easing of legal restrictions within the next few months but maybe I am overly optimistic.

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Car must be "assembled" in NAFTA country. If VIN begins with letters, not numbers, at this time it cannot be legalized. This was told to me by importer who also said to be VERY careful of all the legalizing "franchises" that are popping up on net (and Joco, Guad, etc.). I had several other fly-by-nights that just wanted $ (and many times) original documents sent to them.

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"I was told Mexico isn't nationalizing cars right now anyway?

Ajijicbound

Fact or rumor? Do you have a source to quote?

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"I was told Mexico isn't nationalizing cars right now anyway?

Ajijicbound

Fact or rumor? Do you have a source to quote?

Heard it from Ajijic Law around May

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They are nationalizing cars at the border but there is so much rampant fraud and the costs are very high that it is not worth it, easier to sell your car in the US or else risk facing losing your car and paying thousands to do so!

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