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Betsy

Verdolagas

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Who cooks verdolagas and how do you like to prepare them? Is there an easier way to clean them?

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Who cooks verdolagas and how do you like to prepare them? Is there an easier way to clean them?

Google verdolagas or purslane and you will find recipes.

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Here's a recipe someone gave me after I loved this dish at a potluck. Sorry there's no amounts on the ingredients, but I just guess when I make it and it always comes out good.

VERDOLAGA CASSEROLE

verdolaga

eggs

oil

onions

yogurt

cheese

garlic

salt

oregano

Strip verdolaga leaves off stems and steam.

Mix together eggs, yogurt, salt, and oregano.

Saute onions and garlic in the oil.

Mix all ingredients together and add cheese. Bake in oven.

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A casserole, now thats an idea. I have been cooking verdolagas for years but only one or two different ways. I suppose they can be used like spinach but I just wanted to know what people around here are doing with them. ....thanks!

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A casserole, now thats an idea. I have been cooking verdolagas for years but only one or two different ways. I suppose they can be used like spinach but I just wanted to know what people around here are doing with them. ....thanks!

Let us know how you like it. I used to pick this stuff wild (back in my younger and wilder days). I was surprised to find it a common market item down here.

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Droop the greens in boiling hot and salted water or steam them. Sautee chopped onion chilis and tomatoes in olive oil and mix the drain greens. Taste and add salt and pepper to taste.

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Let us know how you like it. I used to pick this stuff wild (back in my younger and wilder days). I was surprised to find it a common market item down here.

I cant wait to try this casserole, Where did you live when you picked them? I know I have seen them in Florida and Georgia but never considered them to be food until I moved here.

They are an amazing source of valuable nutrients. I buy them on Fridays in the Chapala plaza because that is the day they come in and are freshest. I have asked so many people (north american people) if they eat them and no one has any idea of what Im talking about. I think they get passed over because they are unfamiliar. The leafy greens pickins can be pretty slim around here but I crave them...Gotta have something to go with my cornbread!

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How about some okra to go with your cornbread, maybe stewed with tomatoes and onions? Yankees may sneer, but us deep east Texas refugees know what I'm talkin' about!

I have Clemson Spineless in my garden right now, and will arive at the Lake mid July with Burgundy plants ready to stick in the dirt. I will have some unusual seeds for sale too, salad greens mostly, and some herbs....

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I cant wait to try this casserole, Where did you live when you picked them? I know I have seen them in Florida and Georgia but never considered them to be food until I moved here.

They are an amazing source of valuable nutrients. I buy them on Fridays in the Chapala plaza because that is the day they come in and are freshest. I have asked so many people (north american people) if they eat them and no one has any idea of what Im talking about. I think they get passed over because they are unfamiliar. The leafy greens pickins can be pretty slim around here but I crave them...Gotta have something to go with my cornbread!

I learned to eat purslane (verdolaga) in my "back to the land" days living in southern Oregon. It was a weed that grew everywhere, and I was delighted to discover it ws healthy and delicious.

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How about some okra to go with your cornbread, maybe stewed with tomatoes and onions? Yankees may sneer, but us deep east Texas refugees know what I'm talkin' about!

I have Clemson Spineless in my garden right now, and will arive at the Lake mid July with Burgundy plants ready to stick in the dirt. I will have some unusual seeds for sale too, salad greens mostly, and some herbs....

I would love some okra to go with my cornbread. I wonder why things like turnips, collards and acorn squash are scarce here? Those things just don't seem to be on the Mexican menu. In fact, veggies in general seem to be considered a condiment.

I bought some acorn squash in Atlanta last Fall, It had a "Grown In Mexico" Sticker on it, but I have never seen it here.

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I would love some okra to go with my cornbread. I wonder why things like turnips, collards and acorn squash are scarce here? Those things just don't seem to be on the Mexican menu. In fact, veggies in general seem to be considered a condiment.

I bought some acorn squash in Atlanta last Fall, It had a "Grown In Mexico" Sticker on it, but I have never seen it here.

I've bought turnips at the organic market and okra last week (made a good gumbo) at Superlake.

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