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I have a new Mexican oven. It has gas mark numbers of 1-5. I have searched online to find out approximately what temp range the numbers are, but all I am finding is gas marks for Europe and the UK, which are numbered 1-9. If I went by those numbers, my oven would not be heating up very high.

I have searched through this forum to try and find an answer to this, but I didn't find anything (doesn't mean it's not there, just that I'm not searching for the right words).

I would really love to do some baking.

Can anyone help me with a range of temps for each gas mark number?

Thank you so much.

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Hopefully you have a better stove than mine, and those numbers have some real temperature meaning.

I have a low-end Mabe and the oven dial reads, "Termo control" and is numbered like yours, 1 thru 5. However, this stove does not have a thermostat. It's more like a gas grill, that when you turn the knob, you increase the amount of flame, but it will not 'hold' the heat at any certain temperature, as one would expect with a 'normal' oven.

When I first moved to this house, I asked on this forum, how in the heck do you bake with an oven without a thermostat. I was informed of the 'wooden spoon' method of temperature control....you stick a wooden spoon in the door when the oven gets too hot; remove it when it cools down to the desired temperature (or close enough). Of course, you need a hanging oven thermometer to know the temperature inside the oven.

What make and model of stove do you have?

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I found this in a Mexican cookbook;

1=50 celsius, 2=100, 3=150, 4=200, 5=250.

Your best bet is to have an oven thermometer that shows both Fahrenheit and Celsius.

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I found this in a Mexican cookbook;

1=50 celsius, 2=100, 3=150, 4=200, 5=250.

Your best bet is to have an oven thermometer that shows both Fahrenheit and Celsius.

Thanks! I plan on having an oven thermometer that shows both! I just wanted an estimate of what to expect when turning it on.

My oven is an Acros, which is part of Whirlpools Mexican line. I just moved into a new place and my landlord got new appliances for me. If mine does end up being a "gas grill" type oven, I guess I will just have to learn to adapt to using it! My method of cooking doesn't involve really timing anything anyway. I just keep checking on it.

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Thinking about those number I posted they don't make much sense. Regardless of what that book said something like the following would make more sense; 1=150 Celsius (300F approximately), 2=175 C (350F), 3=200 C (400F), 4= 225 C (450), 5= 250 C (500F). An oven thermometer is really necessary.

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I was told before I started shopping for an oven to watch for the numbering on the knobs, especially for the oven. So I got lucky and made sure I picked one with detents and temps. A little-known trick, picked up only through experience.

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I was told before I started shopping for an oven to watch for the numbering on the knobs, especially for the oven. So I got lucky and made sure I picked one with detents and temps. A little-known trick, picked up only through experience.

I would have preferred one like that, but I didn't have a choice, and I am just very thankful my landlord went and bought a brand new stove and fridge for me, and didn't make my rent any higher in doing so.

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The LCS Directory has a very nice chart of oven temperatures on page 28. Here are a few excerpts:

300 degrees F = 150 degrees C = Gas Mark 2

350 degrees F = 180 degrees C = Gas Mark 4

400 degrees F = 200 degrees C = Gas Mark 6

450 degrees F = 230 degrees C = Gas Mark 8

In our limited but shall we say "exciting" experience with run-of-the-mill Mexican ovens yes, you'd better darn well have an oven thermometer and watch temperatures vigilantly. Set the temperature where you will, it usually goes up - way up - from there. Mexican cooking is pretty much always stovetop cooking; baking just isn't part of the culture. One either adapts, buys a very expensive oven, or discovers a newfound appreciation for the option of buying baked goods from bakeries with better ovens and/or more patience.

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Not necessarily so: If you look for an oven with temperatures on the knob, it will have a thermostat and will operate 'normally'. Ours is that way and was a 'medium priced stove', Acros, not a luxury model. It also has two oven racks, broiler, glass door and heavy grille instead of the thin ones, clock, timer, etc. We bought it at the new Walmart grand opening sale, on Lopez Mateo Sur, prolongacion, about six years ago.

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The LCS Directory has a very nice chart of oven temperatures on page 28. Here are a few excerpts:

300 degrees F = 150 degrees C = Gas Mark 2

350 degrees F = 180 degrees C = Gas Mark 4

400 degrees F = 200 degrees C = Gas Mark 6

450 degrees F = 230 degrees C = Gas Mark 8

In our limited but shall we say "exciting" experience with run-of-the-mill Mexican ovens yes, you'd better darn well have an oven thermometer and watch temperatures vigilantly. Set the temperature where you will, it usually goes up - way up - from there. Mexican cooking is pretty much always stovetop cooking; baking just isn't part of the culture. One either adapts, buys a very expensive oven, or discovers a newfound appreciation for the option of buying baked goods from bakeries with better ovens and/or more patience.

That allright

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Not necessarily so: If you look for an oven with temperatures on the knob, it will have a thermostat and will operate 'normally'. Ours is that way and was a 'medium priced stove', Acros, not a luxury model. It also has two oven racks, broiler, glass door and heavy grille instead of the thin ones, clock, timer, etc. We bought it at the new Walmart grand opening sale, on Lopez Mateo Sur, prolongacion, about six years ago.

Thanks for the education RV! I'm glad to know about this and must have just had bad luck with the stoves in our rentals. Much appreciated.

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The LCS Directory has a very nice chart of oven temperatures on page 28. Here are a few excerpts:

300 degrees F = 150 degrees C = Gas Mark 2

350 degrees F = 180 degrees C = Gas Mark 4

400 degrees F = 200 degrees C = Gas Mark 6

450 degrees F = 230 degrees C = Gas Mark 8

In our limited but shall we say "exciting" experience with run-of-the-mill Mexican ovens yes, you'd better darn well have an oven thermometer and watch temperatures vigilantly. Set the temperature where you will, it usually goes up - way up - from there. Mexican cooking is pretty much always stovetop cooking; baking just isn't part of the culture. One either adapts, buys a very expensive oven, or discovers a newfound appreciation for the option of buying baked goods from bakeries with better ovens and/or more patience.

Thanks for the information. I adapt very well, and am rather good at baking. I enjoy baking, and while I know I can buy stuff already made (and delicious) I prefer making things myself. It can be very therapeutic. Plus, I like knowing what ingredients are in my food and where they come from.

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I have a Whirlpool and #1 on mine usually cooks between 300 and 350 that is the one I use most, if I put it on 2 it goes up to 400 and 450.

Last time my bananas were ready I made 33 loaves and only used the #1 setting.

I also ordered another shelf from Tio Sam's about 3 years ago for $200p.

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I have a Whirlpool and #1 on mine usually cooks between 300 and 350 that is the one I use most, if I put it on 2 it goes up to 400 and 450.

Last time my bananas were ready I made 33 loaves and only used the #1 setting.

I also ordered another shelf from Tio Sam's about 3 years ago for $200p.

Does #5 incinerate things? Thanks for the tip, I think I'll try #1 at first! I figured Tio Sam's would be able to get me an extra shelf!

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It's not that hard. Someone alrady posted what the scale actually means in Celsius. As for "keeping" a "normal" or steady amount of heat in degrees, all you need is to keep the door of the oven closed. Only open up if necessary. We Mexicans been cooking with this ovens for a lifetime and we are better than Americans or Euros at it. :)

Now, you may want a thermostat because if your ovens plumbing (pardon the use of words if incorrect) is cogged then your output of heat will be less than what the scale says it should be.

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I bake alot (cakes and cookies).  I was told to turn the thermostat higher than I wanted when first turning it on and then turn it down to the desired temperature and it would hold there.  I tried it and it works for me.  Before, if I put the temperature on 350 degrees F. it would go up to 400 then to 450 ... it was a mess.  Maybe that will work for you too after you discover what your numbers actually turn out to be for your oven .

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I love to bake but gave up trying to control my gas oven here.  Went to Walmart and bought a Hamilton Beach countertop convection oven, now my baking is a breeze.

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OK you need to bring down a F. oven thermometer and than you know.   Gas marks can vary and more than one system exists.  Getting a thermostat type oven is best but lets face it your chances are small having one in your house when you move in. Mexicans know things about the cheap mabe ovens that we don't know until we figure it out. I agree with the comment on the Hamilton Beach Countertop convection oven.  Love mine.  It puts a nice crunch on stuff rather than soggy hot that many gas ovens do here. Its very accurate for baking and super for warming up anything without that microwave texture that I dislike.  

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The only problem with us purchasing a countertop convection oven is the electricity use.  We stay right on the line and don't want to go into DAC.  I am sure that if I had an electric oven it would push us over.  If the cost of electricity is a concern for you ... you might want to take that into consideration too.

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8 hours ago, Wookie said:

The only problem with us purchasing a countertop convection oven is the electricity use.  We stay right on the line and don't want to go into DAC.  I am sure that if I had an electric oven it would push us over.  If the cost of electricity is a concern for you ... you might want to take that into consideration too.

Agreed but I have not seen it an issue but I don't cook a turkey in it all day either. The GE gas oven does that.   It uses on Max 1500w but what would an full size electric baking oven use?   I would say we use it once a week or so other than five minute burst to rewarm the pizza up.  This is the large size convection oven also.  It gets used also when we have big dinners.  Nice accurate Thermostat. For cooks with only gas ovens I strongly suggest getting one of these or borrow one to see what it does for you.  I wouldn't not have one here. 

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Sounds like several of us bought that nice, large Hamilton Beach convection oven. I love mine. Don't know what I did without it besides waste a lot of propane waiting for the gas stove oven to heat and then more when I was cooking or heating something that wasn't a meal for four or more, but just me. Not to mention the stove oven could heat up half the house, so I couldn't use it for almost three months a year. No problems like that with the countertop convection. No wasted counter space, either. Sits perfectly on top of the microwave. One of my wiser purchases here.

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