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suegra?


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From Spanish to English: mother

From English to Spanish: madre and mama only

Who uses suegra? In what circumstances?

Suegra is mother-in-law. Suegro is father-in-law.

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Suegra means mother in law but it is very often used jokingly.....If there is a girl you like but she is not your girlfriend, or perhaps someone you had a brief encounter with, or even if there is a girl that is really into you but you have no desire to even talk to her....if her mother passes by your friend might say....there goes your suegra.}

It is also used in a more serious manner to refer to the mother of your girlfriend. Or boyfriend.

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  • 2 weeks later...

From Spanish to English: mother

From English to Spanish: madre and mama only

Who uses suegra? In what circumstances?

Bisbee Gal is right, suegra is mother-in-law and suegro is father-in-law, at least those are the meanings in México. Maybe they have different definitions in other Spanish speaking countries. I frequently refer to my wifes' mother as my suegra, especially in emails and sometimes in conversation. My suegra is now using the same Dentista as I do. My Dentista was born and educated in Canada. She speaks fluent Spanish, my Mexican wife says she speaks Spanish like she was born here.

Sometimes my Dentista will ask me in English how my suegra is feeling today? My wifes' brother is my cuñado, if she had a sister, she would be my cuñada. It is a lot quicker and easier to type those Spanish words than it would be to use the English words mother-in-law, brother-in-law, or sister-in-law.

Suegra is never routinely used jokingly, at least not in our little corner of México.

Rex

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My Mexican 4th grade students in Los Angeles taught me this song in 1975. It is called La Suegra...I have been know to sing it with mariachis on occasion.

Señores tengo un problema

que no puedo resolver.

Mi suegra se me ha perdido

y le llora mi mujer.

Avisé a la policia tambien a los periodistas

que la busquen mar y tierra

algo le puede pasar.

Si lo vamos a ayudar

Ud nos tiene que dar......

que señas tiene su suegra

para poderla encontrar.

Han visto el cuerpo de una ballena?

Pues ni mas ni menos.

y la boquita de un hipopótamo?

pues ni mas ni menos.

Han visto como mira una loca?

pues ni mas ni menos.

Saber mecánica, saber herrería, levanta pesos, le gusta el box. Es comunista, espirituista

es media bruja y le gusta el rock.

Yo le suplico a quien se la encuentre

que toque la casualidad

tengo un sueño acariciado

y hoy les pido haga realidad.

Ay ay ay

que se quede con ella

por que yo ya no la quiero

no no no

a mi suegra no la quiero...

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  • 3 weeks later...

Suegra is mother-in-law. Suegro is father-in-law.

I heard another use of the word suegra the other day. A Mexican friend was taking something out of the toaster and the plate was very hot, so she asked me for a suegra. I'd never heard of that word being used for a potholder. My maid also didn't know that usage of the word.

I do know that the little flat-knife-thingy that waiters use to remove crumbs from the table is called a pollito. Cute.

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I heard another use of the word suegra the other day. A Mexican friend was taking something out of the toaster and the plate was very hot, so she asked me for a suegra. I'd never heard of that word being used for a potholder. My maid also didn't know that usage of the word.

I do know that the little flat-knife-thingy that waiters use to remove crumbs from the table is called a pollito. Cute.

I'm not sure why, but my husband loves that the Spanish word for wife (la esposa) is the same as the word for handcuffs (las esposas) :o

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