Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

Mad_Max

Jalisco Executions

Recommended Posts

May 24 http://www.eluniversal.com.mx/notas/682806.html

The last 36 hours, in different events, were recorded in Jalisco at least 10 murders, related, apparently, to organized crime.

The direction of Public Safety Chimaltitán, a municipality adjacent to Zacatecas, reported finding the bodies of four men aged between 40 and 50 years in a gap that leads to a village called San Juan de los pastures.

The bodies had bullet wounds to the face, chest and abdomen. In the place were .223 caliber 27 caps for AR15 assault rifle.

Moreover, in an area of Juarez street extension in the town of Santa Cruz Valley in Tlajomulco de Zuniga, were found the charred bodies of two women aged 15 to 20 years.

Staff of the Jalisco Institute of Forensic Sciences (IJCF) reported that both died of asphyxiation by strangulation indirectly contributed by diffuse skull contusion. The burns were made post mortem, the report says.

Both women had traces of plastic tape on his face and before setting them alight, apparently were covered with sheets and wrapped in black plastic bags.

Meanwhile, also charred human remains were found in a field called El Baral in the municipality of Ixtlahuacán of quince. Until tonight, staff from the Medical Examiner (Semefo) from Guadalajara not say whether the person who is still unknown sex and age as possible, was burnt alive or dead.

In Zapopan, died last night shot dead the chief operating officer of the municipal police Valdenegro Jose Nicolas Araujo.

Also in Zapopan, this morning in a subdivision under construction called Real Cantabria, north of the metropolitan area of Guadalajara, workers discovered a body.

The body that looks 25 to 30 years has a shot in the back.

And minutes before 17:00 hours, on one side of Mariano Otero Avenue extension, near the junction with the San Francisco streets in the neighborhood of Forest Gate, south of Zapopan, was located the body of a man in an advanced state decomposition. Three feet of the corpse had three .30 caliber shell casings M1 rifle.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The director and deputy director of the Ixtlahuacán municipal police force say they have received threats, relating to their functions - and are expected to submit their resignations - along with 10 others.

Source - Informador/Google Translate

***

Because of the lack of support from the City Council of the quince Ixtlahuacán to ensure corporate security police of the municipality, its director, César Navarro, deputy director of the same, Ballesteros Gabriel Ortega, resigned, it is expected that 10 uniformed the corporation to do likewise.

This, as a result of recent performances against public officials, mainly took place last May 5 against the deputy director of the Municipal Police Chapala José Guadalupe Mejia GollazBoth commanders have been threatened Ixtlahuacán against him, relating to their functions.

The main reason for making such a determination is lack of security guarantee to protect their lives by the City, because they were not provided more support to enhance their physical integrity.

It is worth noting that another of the directors of state security was implemented only on Sunday May 23: The chief operating officer of the Directorate General of Public Security of Zapopan Jose Nicolas Araujo Baldenegro, Who received at least five shots outside her house for a couple of men aboard a van, apparently waiting for him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your post. What the heck is going on Ixtlahuacan? Is it just its strategic placement on the highway to Guad, or am I missing something? This seems like a sleepy but relatively well-off Mexican town to me. I have been in other towns (which I will not mention), where there were a lot of young thugs (LA type) hanging around, and others where things just seemed suspiciously out of sorts, but I have never noted anything even mildly suspicious in Ixtlahuacan. Am I missing something?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your post. What the heck is going on Ixtlahuacan? Is it just its strategic placement on the highway to Guad, or am I missing something? This seems like a sleepy but relatively well-off Mexican town to me. I have been in other towns (which I will not mention), where there were a lot of young thugs (LA type) hanging around, and others where things just seemed suspiciously out of sorts, but I have never noted anything even mildly suspicious in Ixtlahuacan. Am I missing something?

Here is today's post in the informador (google translate version) -

Ixtlahuacán of quince, JALISCO (27/MAY/2010).- In the absence of guarantees of personal safety and threats against him, the CEO, chief operating officer and 10 policemen, all belonging to the Municipality of Ixtlahuacán of quince, resigned from his post.

And is that due to high levels of insecurity, lack of equipment to ensure the proper performance of work and lack of support from the municipal mayor, the elements resigned their posts and left the corporation.

The general director of that corporation, César Navarro, explained his reasons why he decided to take this desicion.

"There was lack of support. I received half a corporation, missing vehicles to patrol, arms, training for the elements. We try to level the corporation and we do that, with few resources have occurred, however, I present my resignation because I have received threats to my person, to staff. Even in those messages sent to me said that my items had between "hawks", ie people who watched my movements, and because in the absence of support from the municipal mayor in more resources as I have taken this decision " said the now former staff member.

At the start of Cesar Navarro, we add also the chief operating officer, Gabriel Ballesteros Ortega, like the city more than 10 items, thus leaving the corporation with only 83 elements.

And is that after the implementation of the Municipal Police Deputy Director Chapala, Cesar Navarro and his staff began to arrive were death threats constantly.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

<snip>What the heck is going on Ixtlahuacan? ...am I missing something? This seems like a sleepy but relatively well-off Mexican town to me. Am I missing something?...

You said it yourself. "...relatively well-off..." Did you ever wonder where the money comes from?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no doubt marijuana farming in the mountains; I find it hard to imagine this is the source of friction, but what do I know? Maybe there are some meth labs or distribution centers. I see the villagers employed in ordinary occupations; some commute to Guad or Chapala for jobs. There are some large horse farms and villas between Ixtlahuacan and the mountains--I suppose not all of those are owned by honest hardworking farmers, but I supposed they were "gentlemen's farms" owned by wealthy Tapatios. I have not seen Hummers and tinted-window SUVs that would make me wonder. I'll be over there Friday and maybe I can find out more, or maybe not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And this is where the weapons originate in most cases.

Marine Corp Reservist Caught Attempting To Export Assault Weapons.

Friday, May 28, 2010 | Borderland Reporter Gerardo

Last week on the morning of Thursday, May 20, border patrol agents on duty near the south Texas brush country town of La Pryor encountered a pickup truck stopped on the side of the road due to mechanical problems. This area is approximately 50 miles from the border with Mexico.

Agents became suspicious after observing that the truck had sustained substantial damage, and the two occupants of the vehicle made conflicting statements.

A Border Patrol canine alerted agents to the rear of the pickup where weapons were found hidden inside a load of plywood in the bed of the truck.

The vehicle was transported to the Uvalde Border Patrol Station for intensive inspection. Agents from U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives responded to the Uvalde Station to launch an investigation.

Agents found 52 AR-15 assault rifles, 4 AK-47 assault rifles, 1 SKS rifle, 1 Ruger Mini-14 rifle, 1 FN Fal assault rifle and 49 high-capacity rifle magazines.

Soon after, the driver of the pickup, Cristobal Riojas, 29, a Marine Corp reservist and native of Dallas, Texas was arrested and charged by criminal complaint with unlawfully attempting to export firearms. If convicted, Riojas faces up to 10 years in federal prison and a maximum fine of $250,000.

A week later on Wednesday, May 26, Riojas appeared in federal court in Del Rio, Texas for a detention hearing before U.S. Magistrate Judge Victor R. Garcia.

Judge Garcia listened to testimony from Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) Special Agent Jose Mendoza, who reviewed Riojas’ detention by the Border Patrol and described a series of seven photos taken during the search of the truck Riojas was driving.

Some of the photos show the rifles and magazines, which were wrapped in green cellophane and stashed inside a compartment cut out of the load of plywood in the bed of the truck.

Mendoza, answering questions posed by Assistant U.S. Attorney Ben Seal, also testified Riojas was arrested while he was a juvenile on state charges of burglary, criminal trespass and marijuana possession.

Cross-examined by Riojas’ attorney, Heather Fisher of Denton, Mendoza said Riojas readily provided agents with his driver’s license and his military identification showing that he is a member of the United States Marine Corps Reserves.

Mendoza said Riojas readily allowed the search of the truck, while a passenger, identified as Erika Amaya of Carrollton “lawyered up” – refused to talk to agents – and was later released.

Following the testimony, Seal argued that Riojas posed “a danger to the community.”

“A person who possesses 59 assault rifles in an illegal manner, that person poses a danger to the community,” he said. “These were not hunting weapons. . . (these types of) weapons are made for . . . the specific purpose of killing another person.”

Seal further argued that Riojas posed a special danger because he was allegedly trying to “transport those guns to Mexico,” into “an area filled with drug-related violence,” and charged that the weapons would eventually have been used to protect routes along which drugs are transported.

Fisher countered that Riojas is not a flight risk, pointing out to the court that he has not been to Mexico since he was 11 years old.

She asked that Riojas be released on a personal recognizance bond.

“We do not feel he is a danger, (and) the United States Marine Corps does not think so as well,” Fisher said. “(Riojas) is trusted by the government, and that should carry some weight.”

Immediately following the presentations by the two attorneys, Garcia ordered Riojas detained without bond pending trial and remanded him to the custody of the U.S. Marshals Service.

(source material for this post was obtained from the Eagle Pass Chronicle and the Del Rio News Herald)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And for those who do not think anyone but narcos are at risk.

Commando Attacks Mid School Students in Reynosa from Helicopter

| Borderland Reporter Buggs

Unidentified individuals opened fire from a helicopter on students and teachers of a Mid School that resulted in the injury of a student, Daniela Oyervidez, 13 years of age.

Students from the school told the media that around four in the afternoon last Tuesday they were in break a period at which time they saw a green and black helicopter flying low over the campus. As the helicopter flew over them, people aboard suddenly opened fire.

"It started with one gunshot, then it was four rapid shots and that is when they hit Daniela", said one student.

According to other witnesses, the gunshots were apparently were taken without seeking a specific target. The attack caused panic among students and teachers who were in school, located on Avenida Acapulco, in the community of San Ricardo.

Daniela Oyervidez, the student injured by one of the bullets, was hit on the thigh of the right leg and was subsequently taken to a hospital for medical treatment.

Meanwhile, for some unknown reason the "Information Service of the Government" of Tamaulipas has stopped providing reports to the public of incidents in the state since May 25.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your post. What the heck is going on Ixtlahuacan? Is it just its strategic placement on the highway to Guad, or am I missing something? This seems like a sleepy but relatively well-off Mexican town to me. I have been in other towns (which I will not mention), where there were a lot of young thugs (LA type) hanging around, and others where things just seemed suspiciously out of sorts, but I have never noted anything even mildly suspicious in Ixtlahuacan. Am I missing something?

A huge Meth Lab was raided there just after the murder of the former police chief in Chapala- read the other posts about Manzanillo being the largest port of entry for ingredients for Meth production-

Why would the entire police depart QUIT - they know what's going on. Drug makers and their cohorts and bosses are living in the nice neighborhoods at Lakeside not necessarily in Ixtla.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Their quitting was due to self preservation. Lots going on in that little town. I can't say much but I'm glad I don't live there. More violence and bodies won't surprise me. Anybody think it is more than mere coincidence between a regime change this year and this "new" wave of violence?

This doesn't affect us. Let them clean house as the only way to get rid off the bad people and save the taxpayers money is to do what is being done. Mind your own business and be happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Meanwhile, for some unknown reason the "Information Service of the Government" of Tamaulipas has stopped providing reports to the public of incidents in the state since May 25."

And the local news media in Tamaulipas has long since quit reporting on cartel violence. Any reports out of there generally come in the form of press releases from the military. The same is true in many smaller cities in the interior of the country.

This U. S. citizen child is still missing after the people he was traveling with blundered into a shootout between cartels, or were mistaken for intended victims, about sixty northeast of Monterrey. Briefly, on May 2 he was traveling with a Mexican couple who were friends of the family. They were coming back from Padre Island with his parents accompanying in another vehicle. They had bought gas at a station in General Treviño when unidentified subjects appeared from both sides of the highway and began shooting at them when they fled after being told to stop. The vehicle with the parents in it managed to escape and the man driving the vehicle with his wife and the child of the other couple had to bail out of his vehicle. When he returned to the scene the bodies of his wife and the child were missing and still have not been found. (All these details came out in the news but may not all be in the one link.)

http://www.elporvenir.com.mx/notas.asp?nota_id=394413

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your post. What the heck is going on Ixtlahuacan? Is it just its strategic placement on the highway to Guad, or am I missing something? This seems like a sleepy but relatively well-off Mexican town to me. I have been in other towns (which I will not mention), where there were a lot of young thugs (LA type) hanging around, and others where things just seemed suspiciously out of sorts, but I have never noted anything even mildly suspicious in Ixtlahuacan. Am I missing something?

JayBear, I have not kept up on the current discussion, but it should be noted that Ixtlahuacan de Quince "is not" the same as Ixtlahuacan de los Membrillos (near Chapala). both being in the State of Jalisco.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

JayBear, I have not kept up on the current discussion, but it should be noted that Ixtlahuacan de Quince "is not" the same as Ixtlahuacan de los Membrillos (near Chapala). both being in the State of Jalisco.

Yes, they are the same, it is just a case of bad computerized translation. The name is "de los Membrillos". Google translation renders this as "of the Quince", which is literally correct as "membrillo" means "quince" (the fruit).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest petirroja

JayBear, I have not kept up on the current discussion, but it should be noted that Ixtlahuacan de Quince "is not" the same as Ixtlahuacan de los Membrillos (near Chapala). both being in the State of Jalisco.

Actually, it is nearby Ixtlahuacan de los Membrillos; membrillo is the fruit "quince" in Spanish.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, they are the same, it is just a case of bad computerized translation. The name is "de los Membrillos". Google translation renders this as "of the Quince", which is literally correct as "membrillo" means "quince" (the fruit).

Thanks! I stand corrected. Learn something everyday.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mexico abolished the death penalty in 1961. That was a big mistake. Fail to cut down criminals for 49 years, and no wonder the country is thick with criminals now.

Rufus

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is no evidence anywhere that the existence of the death penalty serves as a deterrent to capital crime; it therefore follows that the absence of the death penalty does not serve as an encouragement to capital crime.

the comments of both rufus and mcsquared are therefore irrelevant

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wrong.

Those states in the USA which have the death penalty also have the highest murder rates.

Nice to see some wisdom on here as noted above versus the right wing rhetoric without facts... mm sounds like FIX NEWS lmao.

http://www.deathpenaltyinfo.org/deterrence-states-without-death-penalty-have-had-consistently-lower-murder-rates

Then if one wants to look a little further compare the US to Canada and one will see there is a huge difference. Keep in mind approximately half the lakeside expats are Canadians so it not all about Americans and the US. :018:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To whom.

Compared to states in the US which do not have the death penalty.

The highest murder rates are in the southern and western states.

Google: Death Penalty Information Center.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder how much of that drug dealing in Cancun results from selling the stuff to tourists.

Also, that picture is interesting, looks like most of the beach is eroded away.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

×
×
  • Create New...