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Advice on getting an FM 2 please


Rony

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Hi,

Anybody who can give me advice on getting an FM2 ?

I am 45 and therefore I still hope to become immigrado, rather sooner then later (so, hopefully in 5 instead of 10 years). I have been here in Mexico many times and even twice on an FM3 but unfortunately this time with the tourist card. I heard that, without having had the FM3 for at least 5 years or without being married to a Mexican citizen, it is extremely difficult to get the FM2 (especially with the 180 days tourist card).

I do have the necessary funds and my Spanish is fluent.

Is there anybody with some positive advice ?

Thanks !!!

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If you plan to become immigrado and you qualify financially apply now. You don't have to have an FM3 first or be married to anyone. I find Mexicans appreciate that I am committed to Mexico when they know I have one.

TioBob

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:018: I would ask the Immigration Office and not rely on web board chat.

It seems to depend on where you are applying. Here in Nayarit, you haven't a chance in hell of getting an FM2 without having your FM3 for 5 years.

We are about to renew our FM2's for the fourth time...next year will be the final application for citizenship.

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:018: I would ask the Immigration Office and not rely on web board chat.

It seems to depend on where you are applying. Here in Nayarit, you haven't a chance in hell of getting an FM2 without having your FM3 for 5 years.

We are about to renew our FM2's for the fourth time...next year will be the final application for citizenship.

[/quote

Yes, first ask the immigration office. I also did the FM3 for 5 years then got my FM2. Finished the FM2 and had to

start another FM2 while my citizenship was in process. I was half way through the 2nd FM2 when i had to do the

citizenship test. I finally got my paper 14 monthes after the test. Between the FM3 AND FM2 inmigration lost my

papers and never took into consideration that my daughter was born here. I always keep copies of any documents.

anyways it can be a long process or not a long one. I now have my voting card and my Mexican passport.

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In Morelia, INM requires five years as an FM-3, then five years as an FM-2, then the choice of applying for either inmigrado status or for citizenship.

IF you are married to a Mexican national OR have Mexican-born children OR have performed some remarkable service to Mexico, it is five years as an FM-3, then two years as an FM-2, then apply for either inmigrado status or for citizenship.

No exceptions in Morelia.

YMMV.

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We moved here at an early age and thought it would be a good idea to go for Immigrado, since renewing FM3's cost would increase every year and we planned on being here forever.

We had our FM3's for one year and now are into our 3rd year with our FM2's. The only thing is you are limited with your travels, but we have no problem with that. You have to be Mexican Plated to become Immigrado.

You pay more in the 5 years that you have it, but after that you don't pay ever again.

I see nothing but positives with having one.

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Hi,

Anybody who can give me advice on getting an FM2 ?

I am 45 and therefore I still hope to become immigrado, rather sooner then later (so, hopefully in 5 instead of 10 years). I have been here in Mexico many times and even twice on an FM3 but unfortunately this time with the tourist card. I heard that, without having had the FM3 for at least 5 years or without being married to a Mexican citizen, it is extremely difficult to get the FM2 (especially with the 180 days tourist card).

I do have the necessary funds and my Spanish is fluent.

Is there anybody with some positive advice ?

Thanks !!!

Here are 2 sites that can answere your questions:

www.lakeside-chapala.com

www.ajijiclaw.com

hope this helps

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Definitely no problem going from a FM-T or a FM-3 to a FM-2 and no time requirements for having a FM-T or FM-3 in Chapala or San Miguel. In other words what Julie says is true at least in these two locations.

As of May 1 could be changes which someone may be aware of.

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The manual for the new immigration law changes mentions converting from an FMM to a FM2 so I take it as there is no requirement to have an FM3 beforehand.

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Immigration is a federal law and it applies to Morelia, Nayarit or Chapala equally. It is not a state jurisdiction. I don’t know where some get their information, but they are wrong if they believe that we need to be on an FM3 (Non-immigrant status) before being able to apply for an FM2(Immigrant).

I have translated the most relevant articles regarding the subject. Please note that the law does not say that a foreigner has to be here five years before being able to apply for a FM2. I believe that the confusion comes from the fact that: The Immigrants (holders of FM2) with legal residence in the country during five years will be able to acquire the migratory quality of “Inmigrados”.

If your immigration officer does not know that, show him the law, OR better, ask him where he sees in the law that you need an FM3 before an FM2. Those are two different status and serve two different purposes.

English version:

Article 41- The foreigners will be admitted legally in the country in agreement with the following qualities:

Non immigrant

Immigrant

Article 42- A non immigrant is a foreigner who, with permission of the Secretariat of Interior, is admitted temporarily in the country, with some of the following characteristics . . .

Article 44- Immigrant is the foreigner who legally enters the country in order to take root and in as much acquire the quality of Inmigrado.

Article 45 - The immigrants will be accepted for five years and will have the obligation to satisfy the requirements of the Secretariat of Interior, that is fulfilling the conditions that were indicated to them when authorizing his entrance and with the other applicable migratory dispositions in order that it is endorsed annually, if it comes, its migratory documentation.

Article 52 – “Inmigrado” is the foreigner who acquires rights of definitive residence in the country.

Article 53 - The Immigrants with legal residence in the country during five years will be able to acquire the migratory quality of “Inmigrados”, whenever they have observed the dispositions of this Law and his regulations and that their activities have been honest and positive for the community.

The Immigrant who has completed his temporary permit of five years, and who does not request the extension of his quality of “Inmigrado” or it was not granted to him, his migratory documentation will be canceled. He will have to leave the country according to the terms indicated by the Secretariat of Interior. In these cases the foreigner will be able to ask for new migratory quality in agreement with the Law.

You don’t need to be a lawyer to understand that, but many lawyers and/or immigration officers seem not to understand that yet.

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You know what, seewee, you are just totally dead wrong about Federal laws being applied equally everywhere in the República. My partner and I live in Morelia, Michoacán, where this is the story:

My partner has had an FM-3 since 2005. She has plenty of income to qualify for an FM-2.

In 2008, she applied for a change to FM-2 status. Nope, she had to have her FM-3 for five full years. In 2009, she applied for a change to FM-2 status. Nope, she had to have her FM-3 for five full years.

This is the end of the fifth year, and she'll apply again for the FM-2 in June. This time she will get it.

You can believe whatever you like, but you'll still be wrong about this. It's a Federal law, but the application is purely local.

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You know what, seewee, you are just totally dead wrong about Federal laws being applied equally everywhere in the República. My partner and I live in Morelia, Michoacán, where this is the story:

My partner has had an FM-3 since 2005. She has plenty of income to qualify for an FM-2.

In 2008, she applied for a change to FM-2 status. Nope, she had to have her FM-3 for five full years. In 2009, she applied for a change to FM-2 status. Nope, she had to have her FM-3 for five full years.

This is the end of the fifth year, and she'll apply again for the FM-2 in June. This time she will get it.

You can believe whatever you like, but you'll still be wrong about this. It's a Federal law, but the application is purely local.

More Liana, you are right, it seems to be a lack of wide experience to believe that federal regulations or laws are applied uniformly throughout this country. At the former INAMI and now INM office here in Morelos state, I had to provide an apostilled original copy of our US marriage certificate every year when renewing my FM3 visa, which was never returned. I also had to provide 2 black and white full face photographs every year, which were never used, except every 5 years when a new visa booklet was made.

A lawyer I used to use suggested a few years ago that he could take an apostilled copy of our marriage certificate to México City and register it with the federal government. Federal law mandates that the federal registration certificate must be returned to me every year. It was for several years, saving me a lot of hassles and money.

Many INM offices will accept computer print outs of US bank statements as proof to meet the income requirements when renewing a visa every year. Here in Cuernavaca, computer print outs are not allowed, only originals from your bank are accepted. I have figured a work around for that though. Even though my wife is a Mexican citizen, I must prove 50% more income than required for me alone, so she can live in her own country.

The formerly corrupt Gerente of the local INM office was replaced a couple of years ago, it was nearly impossible to get her to do anything she was obligated to do without paying her a bribe. I never pay bribes, so of course I had problems every year.

Last year I used a new facilitator here to change from an FM3 visa to a FM2 visa. When I told him that I had registered our marriage with the federal government and he could take that certificate to the INM, he said he didn't need it, my FM3s proved that we were married. Changing from an FM3 to a FM2 was as simple as pie with the new Gerente.

Uniform application of federal methods throughout the country in all federal government agencies? Every year? My foot.

Rex

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You know what, seewee, you are just totally dead wrong about Federal laws being applied equally everywhere in the República. My partner and I live in Morelia, Michoacán, where this is the story:

My partner has had an FM-3 since 2005. She has plenty of income to qualify for an FM-2.

In 2008, she applied for a change to FM-2 status. Nope, she had to have her FM-3 for five full years. In 2009, she applied for a change to FM-2 status. Nope, she had to have her FM-3 for five full years.

This is the end of the fifth year, and she'll apply again for the FM-2 in June. This time she will get it.

You can believe whatever you like, but you'll still be wrong about this. It's a Federal law, but the application is purely local.

Each state is different . In Sinaloa you had to have your FM-3 for five years before you could apply for a FM-2 . Many things will change . You can read the law as many times as you like . The immigration office does not follow rules sometimes . One of the places i work for does translations for tourists . FM2,FM3 and helping

with paper work for immigration. Big companies, hotels,jail etc . I have been working there since 1993 . The first

time i went through paper work was back in 1973 . I have seen good delegates as well as bad delegates come and go through the years . Some people work in immigration just because they are a friend or family member not because they really went to school or studied law . I have seen them get fired right on the spot . I also lived in Guadalajara in the 70s for many years and did paper work there as well . Everyone has their own opiniones as to the law that is fine . Liana is right . I have spoken Spanish and lived here most of my life .

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If your immigration officer does not know that, show him the law, OR better, ask him where he sees in the law that you need an FM3 before an FM2. Those are two different status and serve two different purposes.

In my last post, I failed to address this suggestion that seewee made.

Anybody care to hazard a guess about what might happen if you "show your immigration officer the law" and challenge his/her knowledge of immigration law? LOL.

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I've just finished my FM-2 renewals and am faced with the decision to either:

1. Start a new FM-2 booklet or

2. Move to Immigrado status.

If I understand things correctly, the advantages to moving to Immigrado include no more annual hassle of filing the paperwork, proving income, proving we own and live in our home here and not having such restrictive limits on time I am able to spend outside of Mexico.

The disadvantages that I see for moving to Immigrado status are mainly these:

1. I can not drive my US plated car any longer and would either need to Nationalize the car or return it to the border and sell it in the U.S. and then buy a car in Mexico that is Mexican plated.

2. I understand my car insurance is higher with a Mexican plated car.

3. I would need to get a Mexican driver's license.

4. I would need to pay tax on my car annually in Mexico.

When I weigh them out and think about them, it seems to me that it is less costly to start another 5 year booklet and stay on the FM-2.

I would like to hear what others have experienced and also learn if I am incorrect about what I think are pros and cons.

Thanks for your input,

Valerie

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You are correct about the costs for your car, but I chose inmigrado and think it is well worth it to be free of the

annual hassle of renewals, with ever increasing costs and changes. A big plus with a Mexican-plated car is that I

haven't been stopped even one time!

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:018: I would ask the Immigration Office and not rely on web board chat.

It seems to depend on where you are applying. Here in Nayarit, you haven't a chance in hell of getting an FM2 without having your FM3 for 5 years.

We are about to renew our FM2's for the fourth time...next year will be the final application for citizenship.

seems like I've got a chance in hell as I got an FM2 here in Nayarit after 2 years with FM3 B)

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The annual costs for a Mexican car are less if you get an older one. There is no added 'tenencia' if it is ten years old.

If you don't apply for Inmigrado or naturalization, you may have to revert to an FM3. I'm not sure if you can stay on an FM2 forever. Its purpose is to get you to Inmigrado status.

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You're going to have to choose between applying for Inmigrado status, applying for Mexican citizenship, and going back to an FM-3. You'll be sorry to hear that there is no provision for renewing an FM-2 for another five year stint.

You will also not be able to nationalize your vehicle, so when you are approved for either Inmigrado or citizenship, you will have to have a car with Mexican license plates. My insurance is very inexpensive (full coverage costs me about $3500 pesos/year, but it all depends on the value of your vehicle), so I think you have heard incorrectly about additional expense.

If you buy a new or newer Mexican car, you will have to pay tenencia until the car is 10 years old. Tenencia is an annual tax you pay to use the car on Mexico's roads. The cost of your tenencia depends on the value of your car.

You will also, of course, have to pay for annual license plate renewal.

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If I wanted to apply for an FM2, how early should I apply? For example, my FM3 expires in mid-September. Normally I would start the FM3 renewal process about 1 month before expiration. Does the same apply when I want to apply for FM2 or should I start the application earlier? I don't know why we would be turned-down for FM2, but if for some reason that would happen, are we at risk with our FM3 renewal by waiting?

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If I wanted to apply for an FM2, how early should I apply? For example, my FM3 expires in mid-September. Normally I would start the FM3 renewal process about 1 month before expiration. Does the same apply when I want to apply for FM2 or should I start the application earlier? I don't know why we would be turned-down for FM2, but if for some reason that would happen, are we at risk with our FM3 renewal by waiting?

Apply for your FM-2 on the 30th day prior to the expiration date of your FM-3. If Immigration won't take an FM-2 application, have the application ready for a new FM-3. There should be no processing delay.

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Oh dear MoreLiana, this doesn't sound encouraging at all. EEEK! I definitely don't want to drive a 10 yr old used car in Mexico. We like to travel all over the place and I wouldn't want to rely on an used car with that many years on it so it sounds like I would have to buy a new car in Mexico. And, I think the Tenencia on a new car is outrageous. My Spanish teacher bought a Toyota Rav SUV last year and her Tenencia is over 10,000 pesos! That extra expense alone far outweighs paying for the FM-2 or FM-3 Visa renewal fees each year.

I have a call into Juan Marquez who has done my FM-3 and then my FM-2 for me to find out from him what he thinks I should do at this point but based upon your info., it sounds like going back to an FM-3 is my only real option.

Although I don't like the info., thanks for sharing it with me....

Valerie :(

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Oh dear MoreLiana, this doesn't sound encouraging at all. EEEK! I definitely don't want to drive a 10 yr old used car in Mexico. We like to travel all over the place and I wouldn't want to rely on an used car with that many years on it so it sounds like I would have to buy a new car in Mexico. And, I think the Tenencia on a new car is outrageous. My Spanish teacher bought a Toyota Rav SUV last year and her Tenencia is over 10,000 pesos! That extra expense alone far outweighs paying for the FM-2 or FM-3 Visa renewal fees each year.

I have a call into Juan Marquez who has done my FM-3 and then my FM-2 for me to find out from him what he thinks I should do at this point but based upon your info., it sounds like going back to an FM-3 is my only real option.

Although I don't like the info., thanks for sharing it with me....

Valerie :(

Awhile back there was a lot of chat about lightening-up of the rules for nationalizing foreign cars. That may be an option for you, but I'm afraid that may involve much paperwork, time, and "fees". Also, I thought I read somewhere that the tenencia laws were changing for the better... Sorry, I don't have details - my memory now days is not getting better. Good luck!

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Awhile back there was a lot of chat about lightening-up of the rules for nationalizing foreign cars. That may be an option for you, but I'm afraid that may involve much paperwork, time, and "fees". Also, I thought I read somewhere that the tenencia laws were changing for the better... Sorry, I don't have details - my memory now days is not getting better. Good luck!

I suspect that few of us are young enough to be around to take advantage of rule changes. We were told over 10 years ago that the long distance telephone charge from San Juan Cosala to Ajijic was going to disappear in three months - 10 years later it is still there, although there are now plans with unlimited long distance.

The advantages of having a Mexican plated car have been discussed on this Board many times in the past. People want to hear what they want to hear. If you live in Mexico, what's wrong with having to drive a Mexican plated vehicle. My daughter went back to Canada, and a Canadian resident, citizen or not, is not allowed to have a foreign plated vehicle. Sometimes we should accept that residency brings both good and bad, and the bad isn't often all that bad. We shouldn't expect to have everything our way.

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Cosalamx, my problem with driving a Mexican plated car is that I would have to buy a new car. I don't think they will let me Nationalize my current vehicle. So, I would have to return to the U.S., sell my car then come back to Mexico and pay an inflated price to buy a new car. In addition to the purchase price, then I have to pay a pretty high Tenencia on the car for 10 years in addition to the tag fee.

I have taken great care of my U.S. car and would be sorry to have to sell it in order to buy a new one. I wouldn't trust an used car down here knowing how badly the roads beat them up.

I love living here and after living here for 5 years, consider it my home. I just wish I could Nationalize my car and keep it here.

Still trying to decide whether to bite the bullet and do the Immigrado or start all over with FM-2 or FM-3. Right now there seems to be a difference in opinion as to whether I can do an FM-2 again. Looking forward to meeting with Juan Marquez to hear his take on it.

As always, thanks for the great input from the webboard.

Valerie

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