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Islander

Be good

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Portarse bien. (to a stranger/adult)

Portate bien. (to an intimate or a child)

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Portate bien y si no, me invitas!

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Portarse bien. (to a stranger/adult)

Portate bien. (to an intimate or a child)

Just one quibble, RV.

Pórtese - the usted form requires changing the ending of the verb

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So,... Portese bien (for the usted form) and Portate bien (for the kids)?

Thanks

Right.

(Tú) Pórtate bien, por favor.

(Usted) Pórtese bien, por favor

(Ustedes) Pórtense bien, por favor.

(Nosotros) Portémonos bien, por favor.

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Right.

(Tú) Pórtate bien, por favor.

(Usted) Pórtese bien, por favor

(Ustedes) Pórtense bien, por favor.

(Nosotros) Pórtemonos bien, por favor.

-

Thank you

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Right.

(Tú) Pórtate bien, por favor.

(Usted) Pórtese bien, por favor

(Ustedes) Pórtense bien, por favor.

(Nosotros) Portémonos bien, por favor.

-

Would it be same for "be nice" ?.......which has slightly different meaning than "be good".

Thanks again.

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-

Would it be same for "be nice" ?.......which has slightly different meaning than "be good".

Thanks again.

You could use "sé buena gente" or "sé amable"

However, I've never heard commands used this way here (maybe I wasn't paying attention, or just missed it).

But I have heard commands with "ser" in the negative: "No seas malo" or "No seas sangrón".

Maybe a native speaker, or someone more proficient in the language can help us out here

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I asked this on another web-board and here's the answer (from a Spanish speaker from Spain).

I don't know in Mexico, but in Spain it's very used by mothers :-) : Sé bueno.

If we have a date and you had been late other times, I may probably say: Nos vemos a las ocho. Por favor, sé puntual.

Another example, if my husband hates my sister and she is coming today for lunch, I can say to him: Por favor, sé amable con ella.

I guess the reason I hear the "no seas....." all of the time is because people are always telling me not to be such a pain in the a**:>)

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Here's another response I received from a woman who lives in D.F.

"I think you're right. Imperative can be heard more easily from people with a higher education background, and still they might prefer the colloquial change for a negative command... I think it has to do with our "slight phobia" for sounding rude at using imperative. You might also have noticed we often change it for questions.

Much people prefers "¿me da un refresco?" instead of "déme un refresco" (even saying "por favor")."

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Here's another response I received from a woman who lives in D.F.

"I think you're right. Imperative can be heard more easily from people with a higher education background, and still they might prefer the colloquial change for a negative command... I think it has to do with our "slight phobia" for sounding rude at using imperative. You might also have noticed we often change it for questions.

Much people prefers "¿me da un refresco?" instead of "déme un refresco" (even saying "por favor")."

-

Thanks Willieboy.....most informative.

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I asked this on another web-board and here's the answer (from a Spanish speaker from Spain).

I don't know in Mexico, but in Spain it's very used by mothers :-) : Sé bueno.

If we have a date and you had been late other times, I may probably say: Nos vemos a las ocho. Por favor, sé puntual.

Another example, if my husband hates my sister and she is coming today for lunch, I can say to him: Por favor, sé amable con ella.

I guess the reason I hear the "no seas....." all of the time is because people are always telling me not to be such a pain in the a**:>)

Word of caution, in Mexico NEVER use soy bueno or buena. Very embarrassing to yourself and the listener. Means I'm good in the sack.

Buena gente would be the way to put it.

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But what if you are good in the sack? Do you say soy bien dotado y vas a gustar mamacita o?

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But what if you are good in the sack? Do you say soy bien dotado y vas a gustar mamacita o?

¡Una advertencia!

Si mamacita tiene un novio, peudas estar muerto, y pronto.

Si el hermano de mamacita esta cerca, egual.

Si el padre de mamacita esta cerca, hijole, esfumate, muy rapido.

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Thanks so much for the info, Christina.

That sounds like exactly what I was looking for. Im gonna check it out, and hopefully sign up for a few.

Good luck with your own classes, and thanks again.

gsulliv4

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