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Maybe a Spanish language spell check would help you.

My Spanish friend said that was just fine, she understood with no problem :rolleyes:

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My Spanish friend said that was just fine, she understood with no problem :rolleyes:

Even being fluent in Spanish, there are differences in the meanings of the same word depending on different regions in the same country or any other Spanish speaking country. For intance a chavo in Mexico is a small male child, a penny ( cent ) in Puerto Rico is called a chavo. In Cuba and other countries a bicho is a small bug, in Puerto Rico is a no no word. Sometimes I have to asked mexicans about the meaning of a word because I don't understand what are they talking about.

I congratulate anyone who makes an effort to comunicate in the prevalent language of this country. It sent the message that we, as residents of their country, will repect their culture and their society enough to make an effort an learn their language. Also, for those mexicans NOB, we have to be more linients and forgiven of their missteps with English. Now we know, because we are in their shoes.

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Even being fluent in Spanish, there are differences in the meanings of the same word depending on different regions in the same country or any other Spanish speaking country. For intance a chavo in Mexico is a small male child, a penny ( cent ) in Puerto Rico is called a chavo. In Cuba and other countries a bicho is a small bug, in Puerto Rico is a no no word. Sometimes I have to asked mexicans about the meaning of a word because I don't understand what are they talking about.

Good point. The word pendejo here refers to a really stupid person. In Argentina it means a young person. The word choncha here is a slang term for fat or chunky. In other places it means something else altogether. Curiously, both meanings fit jellyrolbackwards!

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Guest irolbackwards

@bobo, consider your stature a blessing.

Remember, you have to be good here or they'll banish you to never never land.

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Remember, you have to be good here or they'll banish you to never never land.

You mean your website? Salvame dios!

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Guest irolbackwards
You mean your website? Salvame dios!

I closed my board so yes, you are banished from my board too! Now back to PV you go! I lost that site address so blah, blah, blah all you want there. Saluda a Pedo aparte de mi porfa.

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Saluda a Pedo aparte de mi porfa.

"Aparte" de mi? :rolleyes: The only way you will fool a native speaker is by not speaking! It is "de parte".

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Now I'm confused! I thought it was, "Da saludos a alguien de mi parte."

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Now I'm confused! I thought it was, "Da saludos a alguien de mi parte."

Saludos de mi parte (greetings on my part) is correct. You usually use "de parte de" when sending greetings from a third person, i.e. "saludos de parte de mi sobrino" jellyrol used the term "aparte de mi" which means "apart from me"! Besides using the wrong word her sentence construction is funky too.

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Even being fluent in Spanish, there are differences in the meanings of the same word depending on different regions in the same country or any other Spanish speaking country. For intance a chavo in Mexico is a small male child, a penny ( cent ) in Puerto Rico is called a chavo. In Cuba and other countries a bicho is a small bug, in Puerto Rico is a no no word. Sometimes I have to asked mexicans about the meaning of a word because I don't understand what are they talking about.

I congratulate anyone who makes an effort to comunicate in the prevalent language of this country. It sent the message that we, as residents of their country, will repect their culture and their society enough to make an effort an learn their language. Also, for those mexicans NOB, we have to be more linients and forgiven of their missteps with English. Now we know, because we are in their shoes.

When I was teaching newly-arrived, non-English children in NYC, at first most of my kids were Puerto Rican. Then, the Cuban kids started to arrive to get away from "la Revolución." One day we were talking about fruits in NY compared to the tropics. I mentioned papayas-the Cuban kids were scandalized, "Maestra, ud. dijo una muy mala palabra!" Apparently in Cuba, they call the fruit "fruta bomba" and the word papaya has a sexual connatation.

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Guest irolbackwards

Where's julibaga when ya need him? He'll fix my sentence if it's wrong. Maybe it is de parte de mi, of my part. Saluda le de parte de mi. greet him on my behalf. (that's right) Sauluda a Pedro de parte de me.

O carib, ayudame por favor, como se dice lo que quiero decir????

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Where's julibaga when ya need him? He'll fix my sentence if it's wrong. Maybe it is de parte de mi, of my part. Saluda le de parte de mi. greet him on my behalf. (that's right) Sauluda a Pedro de parte de me.

O carib, ayudame por favor, como se dice lo que quiero decir????

You need to quit while you're behind!

All you needed to say was simply: Salúdame a pedro, por favor.

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Guest irolbackwards

I ain't quittin without a good fight! No voy a parar por nada!

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You need to quit while you're behind!

All you needed to say was simply: Salúdame a pedro, por favor.

Así es, solo con P mayúscula.

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Dime con quien andas y te dire quien eres. ............

Tell me who your friends are and I will tell you who you are.

Antes de hablar es bueno pensar. ...(It's good to ) think before you speak.

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"Old guys"?

Es totalmente aparente que apenitas hablas el idioma y que menos sabes de la educación en su sentido más común. Qué grosería, decir "old guys".

Para nosotros es normal. En ninguna manera es una groseria. Esto es obviamente cultural.

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To clarify. more liana is neither ethnically Mexican nor a native Spanish speaker.

Lolo ~ Just what do you mean by "ethnically Méxican"? Lizzy

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Puedo ver la razón de esta batalla. Por favor 'irolbackwards' intente tomar una buena crítica cuando se presenta educadamente. Eso evitará una confrontación.

In my opinion, there was nothing wrong with the original criticism of Willieboy, but because you took it the wrong way, things started to deteriorate. I wanted to participate to the post, but the way it is going, I don't find it interesting any longer. I thought that at least, here, we could be civilized.

Seewee ~ You have echoed the sentiments of many posters on this forum. It seems an irresistible urge for some folks to take control of a situation any way they can... and unfortunately baiting others seems to be the preferred method. Lizzy

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Good point. The word pendejo here refers to a really stupid person. In Argentina it means a young person. The word choncha here is a slang term for fat or chunky. In other places it means something else altogether. Curiously, both meanings fit jellyrolbackwards!

You know Lolo, now you are being rude. Looks to me like Lori wants to play nice so why don't you back off. You are resorting to being just plain ugly and unkind. By the way, do you know the other meaning of "pendejo"? It's not for polite company as it refers to a particular portion of the anatomy. Bad puppy! Lizzy

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You know Lolo, now you are being rude. Looks to me like Lori wants to play nice so why don't you back off. You are resorting to being just plain ugly and unkind. By the way, do you know the other meaning of "pendejo"? It's not for polite company as it refers to a particular portion of the anatomy. Bad puppy! Lizzy

Not long ago, my daughter was invited to our neighbors house to help celebrate their son's birthday. During her visit the son recieved a congratulatory phone call from some mutual friends from Argentina. Daniel, our friends' son just turned 24. The Argentines told him he was "todavia un pendejo" which provoked a lot of laughs amongst the Mexicans, one of which is my daughter. And they, including his siblings, btw, chided poor Daniel the rest of the evening with "Daniel! eres todavia un pendejo".

Yes, dear lizzy, I DO know the meaning(s) of the word pendejo and its nuances, especially in the Mexican lexicon. And if I didn't I wouldn't need to ask on this forum. I could simply ask either my wife of many years or one of my three grown children.

As far as the jellyroll is concerned, I find her one of the most rude and offensive people on this message board. And she shall reap what she sows.

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Ah Chihuahua! Cuanto apache... Cuanto indio sin huraches. I've always heard Ah Chihuahua but never the follow up part about the apache and indian until today. Anyway my friends get a big kick out of the whole phrase.

Also this one I heard today while standing in a line with a bunch of Mexican lawyers in Guad:

Cuando vayas a abogado, llevate un gato... Que el gato salta sobre el abodado, el es un rata. Si, el gato corre, el es un pero, un gran chingon.

When you go to see a lawyer, take a cat. If the cat jumps on the lawyer then the lawyer is a rat. If the cat runs from the lawyer, then the lawyer is a dog, (as in the US, a junkyard dog that will get your money.)

One of the lawyers told me that modismo for the rich upper class Mexicans (and/or pochos who return to Mexican and act like rich uppity Mexicans) is creeidos. A young girl standing behind me said that younger Mexicans call uppity Mexicans and pochos --- fresas (strawberries). You can sure learn a lot when you are standing in line for 6 hours.

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