Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Search the Community

Showing results for tags 'residente'.



More search options

  • Search By Tags

    Type tags separated by commas.
  • Search By Author

Content Type


Forums

  • Chapala.com Webboard
    • Ajijic/Chapala/Guadalajara
    • Let's Talk About our Furry and Feathered Friends
    • Mexico General
    • Customs and Immigration
    • La Cocina
    • Charitable and Other Events Upcoming
    • Lakeside Restaurant/Bistro Happenings
    • THE LAKESIDE ART SCENE
    • Lake Chapala Society
    • American Legion
    • Learning Spanish
    • Lago de Chapala
  • Classifieds
    • Automobiles
    • Computers & Software
    • General Merchandise
    • Pets & Supplies
    • Collectibles

Find results in...

Find results that contain...


Date Created

  • Start

    End


Last Updated

  • Start

    End


Filter by number of...

Joined

  • Start

    End


Group


AIM


MSN


Website URL


ICQ


Yahoo


Jabber


Skype


Location


Interests

Found 7 results

  1. I'm wondering if anyone has information on whether a Residente Permanente or a Mexican Citizen can bring a US plated car into Mexico on a Temporary Importation Permit? I'm a RP and my wife is a Mexican born citizen. We'd like to bring house stuff from our US home to our home Lakeside. Could I bring in my US plated pickup on the TIP as a Residente Permanente or could my Mexican wife if I put the truck title and registration in her name? I have a Mexican neighbor who had a US plated car and took it to Mexico on vacation. Can we do this legally too? Any information or personal experiences appreciated!
  2. http://www.chapalalaw.com/immigration-2/ The Mexican government published changes to the immigration regulations in October, 2014 which lower the financial requirements in order to apply for temporary and permanent visas at Mexican consulates outside Mexico. They still have not changed the rules for applying within Mexico. This will affect people who renew late and need to do a regularization (residente temporal) as well as people who want to change from temporary to permanent before completing four years residency. VISA REQUIREMENTS AT MEXICAN CONSULATES OUTSIDE MEXICO: To qualify for the temporary visa they must show a monthly income of 300 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 21,030 pesos or $1,430 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 5,000 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 350,500 pesos or $23,843 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. To qualify for the permanent visa they must show a monthly income of 500 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 35,050 pesos or $2,384 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 20,000 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 1,402,000 pesos or $95,374 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. You can apply for visas for your spouse (gay couples included) and children at the consulate at the same time or we can do it when you are here in Mexico once the primary applicant has their visa. Remember that in order to do this we will need birth / marriage certificates and apostilles (legalized copies for those from Canada or non Hague Convention countries). Please be advised that the consulates might have their own special rules. Processing time varies from a few hours to a few days on average. We can consult with you prior to your trip to the consulate and then prepare you for finishing the process here in Mexico as well as advise you how to properly fill out the FMM form upon arrival so that there will be no processing delays. Clients have reported that the consulates in Laredo, Texas and Las Vegas, Nevada are some of the easier ones to deal with as Las Vegas only requires US$1,000 per month to get temporary. While the law says you must give 6 or 12 months bank statements, many consulates only ask for 3 to 6 months. DIFFERENT RULES FOR VISAS APPLIED FOR IN COUNTRY AT THE NATIONAL IMMIGRATION INSTITUTE (INAMI) To qualify for the temporary visa they must show a monthly income of 400 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 28,040 pesos or $1,907 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 20,000 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 1,402,000 pesos or $95,374 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements. To qualify for the permanent visa they must show a monthly income of 500 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 35,050 pesos or $2,384 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 6 months bank statements. People who have liquid assets may qualify showing that they have maintained an average balance of 25,000 times the minimum wage (for 2015 it is 70.10 pesos) or 1,752,000 pesos or $119,217 US dollars using an exchange rate of 14.7 to 1 (using December 29, 2014 exchange rate). This must be documented with 12 months bank statements.
  3. HUGE Changes today (10 Oct 2014) to Mexican immigration law These changes apply to visas issued at Mexican consulates outside Mexico. I am assuming that there will be a publication soon applicable to people renewing within Mexico to harmonize the new lower financial requirements. Reduced income requirements for temporary residence, new income / asset requirements: Balances in bank 5,000 days minimum wage (67.29 pesos) $336,450 pesos or $25,164US, down from old minimum of 20,000 days minimum wage or $1,345,800 pesos or $100,658US at todays exchange rate. Monthly income 300 days minimum wage (67.29 pesos) $20,187 pesos or $1,510US down from old minimum of 400 days or $26,916 pesos or $2,013US 1. Original y copia de comprobante de inversiones o cuentas bancarias con saldo promedio mensual equivalente a cinco mil días de salario mínimo general vigente en el Distrito Federal, durante los últimos doce meses; o 2. Original y copia de los documentos que demuestren que cuenta con empleo o pensión con ingresos mensuales libres de gravámenes mayores al equivalente de trescientos días de salario mínimo general vigente en el Distrito Federal, durante los últimos seis meses. Permanent residents have same income requirements but lower asset requirements: Balances in bank 20,000 days minimum wage (67.29 pesos) $1,345,800 pesos or $100,658US down from old requirement of 25,000 days minimum wage or $1,682,250 pesos or $125,822US using todays exchange rate. Presentar los documentos que acrediten alguno de los siguientes supuestos: a. Jubilados o pensionados: 1. Original y copia de comprobante de inversiones o cuentas bancarias con saldo promedio mensual equivalente a veinte mil días de salario mínimo general vigente en el Distrito Federal, durante los últimos doce meses, o 2. Original y copia de los documentos que demuestren que cuenta con pensión con ingresos mensuales libres de gravámenes mayores al equivalente de quinientos días de salario mínimo general vigente en el Distrito Federal, durante los últimos seis meses. These changes should allow more foreigners to enter as temporary residents and start a small business as one needs their immigration document to be able to get CURP and RFC numbers to be able to set up a business. The changes also talk about requiring apostilles and translations for documents used at consulates but then also mentions the point system for permanentes so hopefully they publish it soon. Another publication should be forthcoming to integrate the changes published for the consulates for the practices with Mexico by immigration so that those within Mexico can take advantage of the new lower limits. The changes were published in the Diario Oficial today, Friday October 10, 2014 and take effect 5 business days after publication, Friday October 17, 2014 http://www.dof.gob.mx/nota_to_doc.php?codnota=5363602
  4. Anyone selling who is worried about capital gains and where the notary is requiring them to be a Residente Permanente may want to share the following information with the notary, this was published today and should work for temporales to avoid capital gains as the law mentions a presumption that foreigners that sell their homes in Mexico are residents for tax purposes when they comply with the following: I. Declare under penalty of perjury a) That they are residents in Mexico for tax purposes (Here article 9 of the tax code says you are a resident if you have no home in another country but if you do then you would need Mexico to be the center of your interests and would need 50% of our income to come from here). So reading this I can see why if someone has 2 homes the notary would want them to be permanent or have working papers if temporary but not if they only have one home. Their tax home, or if you don't have one an address to receive notifications. The address can never be the property being sold. II. Additionally prove their condition as a resident of Mexico. This requirement is met with a certificate of tax residence (which we can get for you from the SAT office) or RFC sheet you get online with your CURP. Here is the text from the publication today in the DOF http://dof.gob.mx/nota_detalle.php?codigo=5336743&fecha=13/03/2014 Condición para acreditar que las personas físicas de nacionalidad extranjera que enajenan su casa habitación son residentes en México para efectos fiscales I.3.10.13. Para los efectos de los artículos 93, fracción XIX, inciso a) de la Ley del ISR y 9, fracción I, inciso a) del CFF, se presumirá, salvo prueba en contrario, que las personas físicas de nacionalidad extranjera que enajenan su casa habitación son residentes en México para efectos fiscales, cuando se cumplan los siguientes requisitos: I. Declaren, bajo protesta de decir verdad, lo siguiente: a) Que tienen la condición de residentes en México para efectos fiscales, en los términos del artículo 9, fracción I del CFF y, en su caso, de los tratados para evitar la doble tributación que México tiene en vigor. Su domicilio fiscal o, en su defecto, un domicilio para oír y recibir notificaciones. En ningún caso el domicilio señalado podrá ser o encontrarse en la casa habitación que enajenan. ............................................................................................................................................................................................. II. Adicionalmente a lo anterior, acrediten su condición de residente en México. Para tales efectos, se considerará que se acredita dicha condición con la constancia de residencia para efectos fiscales a que se refiere la regla II.2.1.4., o en su defecto, con la cédula de identificación fiscal referida en la regla I.2.4.2. I.2.4.2. Para los efectos del artículo 27, décimo segundo párrafo del CFF la cédula de identificación fiscal, así como la constancia de registro en el RFC, son las contenidas en el Anexo 1, rubro B, numerales 1, 1.1. y 2. ............................................................................................................................................................................................. Cuando la persona física que enajena su casa habitación no sea residente para efectos fiscales en México o no sea residente para efectos fiscales en el extranjero con establecimiento permanente en el país, no será aplicable la exención establecida en el artículo 93, fracción XIX, inciso a) de la Ley del ISR. En este supuesto, los fedatarios públicos, que por disposición legal tengan funciones notariales, estarán a lo dispuesto por el artículo 26, fracción I del CFF, respecto de la enajenación de que se trate, debiendo calcular y enterar el impuesto en los términos de lo previsto en el artículo 160 de la Ley del ISR. CFF 9, 26, LISR 93, 155, RCFF 5, RLISR 130, RMF 2014 I.2.4.2., I.3.10.6., II.2.1.4.
  5. Today I attended a conference on Practical Applications of the New immigration Law at the Corporate Attorneys Bar Association (ANADE) of which I will be their newest member. The keynote speaker was Lic. Doris Gabriela Michel Sinsel with whom we have dealt with various times at immigration in Guadalajara. She spoke on the new law and there was probably an hour of questions and answers between the other attorneys and her going over some of the fine points of application of the new law. While regurgitating everything here might not be productive, I will comment on a few items that were brought out that might be relevant to the broadest audience of readers here. One important item is that if they find that you left or entered as a tourist while your papers are in process then they will cancel your papers in process so for those who do not want to spend the time or money for a travel letter, beware of being penny wise and pound foolish. She acknowledged that the new system is more expensive and slower and that there still is a backlog with one company manufacturing cards nationally. When immigration notifies you that they need an item they will usually give you 10 days to provide them with that item and if you do not do so then your file will be canceled. There are ways to get an extension if the request is provided in the proper format and in writing and timely but then the Federal Administrative Law only allows them 1/2 the original time period maximum for the extension so 5 days, prior they were giving up to 30 days. There are some ways around this and a good attorney will know how to buy time. GREAT NEWS! They now will be honoring prior year cumulatively on FM2 and FM3 to apply to jump ahead to permanente without financials. This is being applied this week, it might take longer to verify prior years on an FM3 if you have only had your FM2 for lets say a year. All employers need to register with immigration and they will start requesting to see registrations, even for self employed people so do it now to not have a problem where your failure to do so makes them request you do so within 10 days and of course if it takes longer then you will have your case dismissed and have to regularize paying additional fees and fines. And last but not least.... the explanation why so many permanent people have been in limbo. So what we were told when we requested a hearing Monday was true that files sent to Guadalajara and stalled will be returned to Chapala for decision BUT there is no way in their computer system to send the files back to Chapala, only receive them for tracking, they hope to work this bug out and resolve all stalled files within 15 days. I brought along the list of our clients who were stalled in the system and their file numbers to have her look into our people tomorrow. All the prior information is from the attorney for the Guadalajara office. she also commented that one of the heads there quit so they are short staffed. Chapala had a meeting today for the attorneys and facilitators, my associate attorney went, they want complete files in Chapala and will start rejecting incomeplete files so you have been warned, that was pretty much the gist of it. They are still working out the kinks in the new policy of allowing the local Chapala office to do more including approve permanente applications and doing the fingerprints for them. Seminar titles in Spanish El Colegio Asociación Nacional de Abogados de Empresa de Jalisco A.C. Lineamientos Generales De Trámites Migratorios - Parte Práctica de la Nueva Reforma Migratoria.
  6. So to let you all know, today we were informed that immigration has changed their policy and will now only allow people who get the preauthorization at the consulate for resident temporal to swap that for a card good for one year. Previously you could choose from one to four years. I couldn't believe it and checked the written instructions we had and compared them with INM web site and yes they changed their policy / stance and if you have a temporal from the Mexican consulate then you can only get a temporal card here for one year.
  7. I checked with a notary today after being informed by someone that the notaries will accept the residente temporal immigration document to avoid the payment of capital gains on the sale of your primary home and not require the residente permanente document as they were requiring before. I was told that many local notarios are on board and personally confirmed this with Macias, notary #5.
×
×
  • Create New...