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RVGRINGO

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Everything posted by RVGRINGO

  1. We have a submersible pump in the aljibe, which feeds a pressure tank, as well as a back-up tinaco on the roof. As such, we always have water, but the pressure does vary a bit because of the 20-40 psi range of the tank. However, that does not affect our hot water temperatures, since we have a solar hot water heater with a 160 Liter tank. Once the mix is established, the temperature is stable without regard to pressure variations. It is the best of both worlds.
  2. I recommended Oscar for the reasons mentioned above: Quality work with reliable results. We have veranda furniture that he did for us ten years ago and it is just as good as new; excellent stitching, quality zippers and fine fabric.
  3. Oscar, on the boulevard going toward the Chapala Cultural Center/old train station. On the right with sign painted on the building.
  4. Ouch! That hurt my ears, HarryB. Please turn down your decibel level.
  5. But, a voltage regulator probably would not have helped to save it, if it was knocked out by a strong surge beyond the capacity of the regulator.
  6. Repeat of post #2 with emphasis. Save your money.
  7. In 13 years, we have never used regulators, and have never lost an appliance. Regulators only adjust for small voltage fluctuations and do not protect against massive surges; those are the situations where damage may be done, as in a lightning strike at your house. Little else need be feared.
  8. Bowels? They took out a meter and a half of mine in a colectomy last February. Oh well; I live and eat. So far, so good. Reasonable health? Not lately. I feel like a hermit, but I do like noodles. One at a time is excellent scientific procedure. Too bad so few took Science 101. Good humor is a good idea. Enjoy.
  9. I feel the same way, ComputerGuy. Fads are fads and there is a certain mentality that is attracted to them if they have exotic sounding names. Most of those names are just the names of common traditional foods, centuries old, from other parts of the world; usually the impoverished parts full of skinny people. So, maybe the fad seekers thing they will get skinny by eating those things. I think I may soon have to augment my income, so watch for the grand opening of my shop selling EKMEK. It is absolutely natural and tastes wonderful. It is an entirely pro-life product with a seven century history of health benefits.
  10. Aladinos, in Guadalajara may have what you need. They are on Pablo Neruda, west of Av. Terranova. Elbelgicano, Rony, on this forum, may have suggestions regarding chocolate.
  11. If you have an antique piece of hardware and cannot find another, take it to a local ironworker. Some of these guys are true artists and can copy an item for you.
  12. Mexico Rustico may be able to help. Otherwise, if you want real antique hardware, or even reproductions, you will have to wander the streets of Tlaquepaque and Guadalajara.
  13. Actually, I have never seen it NoB; only in Mexico, nor have I been NoB in over a decade. You are on your own. Ask a clerk.
  14. Microdyne is usually in the vegetable department of most grocery stores.
  15. The information you received is correct. As a Residente Temporal, you are expected to be in Mexico and to apply at the appropriate time, at your nearest INM office, when you have completed four years as Temporal and are within 30 days of expiration. You will then be eligible to apply for Residente Permanente without the need to prove financials, etc. Only those without visas may apply in their home country.
  16. Tourists, with an FMM tourist permit, must leave Mexico within the 180 day period and can only apply for a residence visa, either temporal or permanente, at a Mexican consulate in their home country. It cannot be done in Mexico.
  17. Sometimes the banks or agencies goof up and the bill is not paid. Then, the trouble begins and the owner pays anyway. Sometimes friends forget ................................................................ Ditto. So, it seems the best solution is to pay ahead at Telmex and/or CFE, with a sufficient overage to cover any eventuality. It works, and you can adjust when you get back in town.
  18. I think it would be very unwise for him to drive it without you in the passenger seat. You might have to bail them both out.
  19. Your car is now illegal. Neither of you should drive it. Confiscation is possible. Follow the advice to get the safe exit letter and take it out of Mexico in the window the letter provides. You might want to get Spencer to help you. (Intercasa, on this forum)
  20. If you have the time, you might call Clay County, SD and ask what they require for you and your wife to sell the car to just you. Get the title from SD and then go north to sell it. cclaycountysd.org
  21. Give it up Cedros. You are confusing Canadian registration with US, or even Jalisco documents; apples and oranges. US vehicles have Titles (proof of ownership) and Registration (proof of permission to use the vehicle on the highways), and the driver must have a license. Granted, it is different in Canada. So, if Canada will allow you to drive around without current stickers, then reciprocity might allow you to do the same in Jalisco. But, maybe not. US automobile registrations will have expiration dates and are renewed, annually in most states. If not renewed, you may not drive that vehicle anywhere.
  22. That could be true, but I've never heard anything other than, 'Your registration has expired,' from a US State Trooper, in that type of situation. What state gave you your information, and does it apply to all states? If your 'road tax' hasn't been paid, somewhere, it would seem logical to assume that you no longer have, "permission to circulate". I do get the feeling that you, and many others, simply want it to be 'your way', not the way Jalisco wants it to be.
  23. Huh! If your registration is "correct/current", then your tags will also be current. At least on Planet Earth. Therefore your 'interpretation' matches mine.
  24. I'll repeat: You are correct; you have permission to have your vehicle in Mexico. HOWEVER, you do not have permission to drive it in Mexico without current registration, somewhere. Go to the Jalisco website, search out the traffic laws and you will eventually find the part that requires 'permission to circulate'. Lots and lots of reading in Spanish, but it is in there; I looked it up once, but admit that it took all day. It doesn't matter if there is, or is not and "issue" with your insurance company. It is 'Transito' of the State that matters regarding current registration, going to jail, confiscation, etc. Read the law, if you can. Otherwise, do what you will, but don't whine about the possible consequences.
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