Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Cactus Jack

Members
  • Content Count

    37
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Community Reputation

11 Good

About Cactus Jack

  • Rank
    Newbie

Recent Profile Visitors

The recent visitors block is disabled and is not being shown to other users.

  1. Please continue. Your contribution is valuable. I think this is a period of global readjustment to a major change. Gutenberg was named by A&E as the most influential person of the previous millenium, in 1999, because movable type transformed society. Literacy rates were 5% before, and within a generation were 90%, because books became available to everyone. The Internet has done the same thing. Surely this is a cause for much of the chaos society is going through. We simply haven't had time yet to understand and absorb the massive amount of information available to us now. We shouldn't forget that something that has never happened before could be happening now, and when we are in the midst of it, we can't see the whole of it. This could be what's happening now in the US and around the world. The Internet has had a massive impact. To what extent? This has to impact economics, too, right?
  2. Looking for the balance between wishes and dreams and reality with some sacrifices. It will be an interesting study over the next few years. Keep us in mind as your investigation continues. Don and Terrie
  3. Terrific information and well above my pay grade, I'm sorry to say. Fascinating stuff. I'm a politics junkie, and lean left. I worry about oligarchy more than I do nihilism. I'm worried about the enormous divide between both sides, and compromise in the US doesn't appear to possible in any sort of near-future. We seem to be in a severe downward spiral. Some have been to wonder if this is a return to 1860 and this time the US lets them go. This must be what political uncertainty looks like. How bad can it get for the US, which is bad for the world? The stock market appears to be divorced from real life. There doesn't seem to a lot of worry among stock traders. After 2009, who can blame them? They have been immunized from disaster. But I doubt currency traders will get the same break if they ever get it wrong. Is it possible at some point that another currency becomes the world-wide default currency?
  4. In my experience, this could really not be called middle class. This would be rich. Very rich. Everyone needs someone to look down on. I provide a public service to all.
  5. Why would I be asking so many questions? Thank you for your contribution.
  6. My point was how in Florida, those behind the gates do not become involved in the community. They do not socialize with people outside their gates. They do not know what's going on in town. They have warped perceptions about where they live due to preconceived views and their unwillingness to be a part of the community. They constantly complain about taxes and anything that "isn't like home." It would be a shame if they brought those same feelings to another country. They have money, so they can bend their surroundings to fit. I have no idea about the situation down there, other than what I've read.
  7. Deepest respects to you and your circumstances. Thanks for the encouragement. Best wishes to you both, sir. Don and Terrie
  8. I believe you are both correct. How to define your space is part of the challenge, right? How much of Mexico do we want to absorb? Any? As little as possible, or as much as we can become Mexican? How resistant am we? These are existential questions. What do I want, what can I pay for, and how much am I willing to forego? Finding the balance, and knowing that in time we adapt very well. (And keep reminding ourselves.)
  9. A goal. We both have people at work who love to help us practice. A big advantage we have is living right in the barrio of Las Vegas. Most of the stores in our area are latino.
  10. I'm a dedicated morning person, while Terrie loves to sleep. I love sunrise and sunset and don't care much about the night. You probably have experience with roosters. I did in Worcester, MA, too! You know, I'll be really interested in seeing those gated communities. I wonder if they are like the ones in Florida, which should be outlawed immediately. They are a cancer on society. They do not assimilate. (In FLorida). I wouldn't want to be one of those people, and wouldn't like it if I wanted to be one. It's not a community, but what one looks like to those who have settled. The thing they do best is bitch about the locals. I've had plenty of them, I tell ya.
  11. This is probably a sensitive subject to some people and might raise some strong opinions, but I ran across a line this week which I'd like to confirm. A person living on a modest retirement income will be upper-middle class in Mexico.
  12. Good information on health insurance. On the Gringo Bubble, that's an interesting take. Would the people who do not live in Ajijic be living behind the gates in their McMansions? lol Are their properties that are for rent with some elbow room. Not many neighbors? For some reason, Terrie wants chickens.
  13. No kidding?! That's excellente, amigo! You probably have a different perspective which we'd find useful. What do you see with people like us moving to Mexico? Where do you see us struggling? Language? Customs? Assimilating? Thanks. Sounds like you've found a way.
  14. I'm going to make an assumption. People who are planning to do what we are talking about are in good health. I would think it's going to take "youthful energy" to pull up stakes and move around the world. For the rest, it's an option. Extremely useful. It's the difference in a struggling lifestyle and one with some amenities. I bookmarked that two year-old article. I think it still applies, and in the future will go up in value. Unless their is a recession, which really could affect those of us still working.
×
×
  • Create New...