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Newbie3

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  1. Thank you, everyone, for your contributions. From expert advice earned from years of experience, to valuable laymen's experiences, all are most helpful. I learned a lot! Thanks again.
  2. From what little I understand, adding lots of new subscribers does not degrade DSL (as each subscriber has separate, physical wires to the telco), but will degrade cable internet (which has a shared circuit). What about fiber optic?
  3. Would 20 minutes of keeping the milk at a simmer (with bubbles coming up, a slow boil) for 20 minutes do the job? I'd read that 13 minutes at sea level will kill most water-borne parasites... Plus a minute for every 1,000 feet in elevation. So that's another 5 minutes, plus an extra couple minutes for a safety margin, so that's 20 minutes total).
  4. I don't know what Dental Express' policy is regarding walk-ins. I would suggest giving them a call and ask for a free consultation with Dr. Edgard or Dr. Rodrigo, whoever has the next available opening. Dr. Rodrigo did the actual overdenture work. Dr. Sergio also has experience with overdentures (I've never met him). The same design that holds a nightguard in place. I think it's made just a little smaller than the actual teeth, so the overdenture "snugs in". Also, it has protrusions that act as "space holders" for my missing teeth, to keep the remaining teeth from drifting into the gap at an angle, resulting in "bad bite". These space holders help keep the overdenture in place as well. I've haven't yet tried eating thick, gooey foods that create a suction when chewing. I suppose with time the overdenture might become somewhat loose. After two years, my night guard is somewhat loose, but still works fine. There is the option to "reline" to make it snug again, but that has its drawbacks (see original post).
  5. [Disclaimer: I am not a medical practitioner. I'm simply relating my experience in case it's useful to you. Each person's situation is different. What works for me might not work for you. Please consult your dentist for professional counsel tailored to your unique situation.] This is not a widely-promoted option in the West, as mentioned by a dental research organization (based in India) in this study: The cost of the overdenture? 4900 MXN My overdenture is basically a heavy-duty plastic night guard that you wear during the day, at meals, etc. It's worn on the upper arch and covers and cushions all the upper teeth, thus protecting all the teeth in the mouth. It has a row of attractive faux teeth "fronts", which has improved my smile quite a bit, at a minimal cost to boot! Here's the front of my overdenture. You can see the nice white "picket fence" of faux teeth "fronts": Here's a top view, you can see the trough where my real upper teeth fit in behind the fronts: Here's an underside view: Notice how all my upper teeth are totally protected from abrasion, as well as from food particles getting forced into the gaps between the upper teeth and the gums, which eventually would've caused additional problems. This same surface protects my lower teeth as well, as they no longer grind into the upper teeth, but rather into the overdenture's (relatively) soft plastic -- the same protective principle as a night guard. In my case, because I have bruxism (unconscious grinding of teeth, particularly during sleep), the tops of my teeth have worn down. This worked in my favor, because this made room in my bite for the overdenture to fit in without having to grind down or modify my teeth! Also, I have enough natural teeth to fully support the overdenture, it just snaps into place, no implants, clasps, or hooks needed. All that was needed were some impressions to make the overdenture. If I had opted for crowns instead, my teeth would need to be ground ("tapered") so each crown would fit in the same space as the original tooth. I'm missing some lower teeth, and thus needed some bridges. Rather than expensive permanent bridges and implants, I opted for an RFD (Removable Flexible Denture -- bi-lateral bridge). I opted to have the framework made from Lucitone FRS, a nylon resin, which is considered more biocompatible than some other materials. I opted for the default acrylic teeth, to keep costs down. The RFD added another 4900 MXN to the total cost. Finally, I ordered a night guard. While I could've just used the overdenture and RFD for nighttime use as well, a night guard is much smaller, covering only the top third of the upper teeth (because appearance is not a factor) rather than the full height of the teeth and thus promotes unimpeded saliva flow overnight. My night guard cost 1100 MXN rather than 700 MXN, as I had it made of Lucitone FRS (for higher biocompatibility), which for night guards requires more labor, compared with the automated process for night guards. From what I understand it will last longer. So, the total cost for * one overdenture, for the top arch (4900 MXN) * one RFD, for the bottom arch (4900 MXN) * one night guard (1100 MXN) is 10,900 MXN. As one dental hygienist said, "Interestingly, the more complex and biologically incompatible the option, the more costly it is." Best of all, I can easily remove everything and give my teeth and gums a good cleaning as needed, unlike permanent bridgework and crowns. For the RFD, I found the following article from Dr. Mercola's website was quite informative (though I opted for the default acrylic teeth, for cost considerations): It's been two months since I got my overdenture, a year on my RFD, and two years on my night guard -- they're all working great! With this type of denture, if the fit becomes loose, it can be "relined", using what is called "cold patch" (as compared to the hot liquid plastic used when the denture is originally cast). A year ago I had an RFD repaired (that I'd dropped) using cold patch, but from then on I noticed a strong plastic taste after wearing the RFD for a while. From what I've read, cold-patch is less biocompatible then the original plastic. I want to thank the staff at Dental Express (in western Ajijic on the Carretera, 376-106-2080) for their support while on this journey: Dr. Edgard Macías, clinic director. An excellent communicator and teacher. Dr. Rodrigo Serrano, who said we'll work on this until it's right. And he did! It's very comfortable. Ivan Arrayga, dental lab lead technician. His painstaking work, in teamwork with Drs. Edgard and Rodrigo, was much appreciated. I would recommend them. * free consultations * reasonable prices * free shuttle ("in town") * in-house lab * modern equipment
  6. I purchase 100 pesos of credit every 59 days to keep my cellphone alive. I used to transfer all 100 pesos of these paid credits to a friend's phone, and I simply use my "regalo" or gift credits for my limited use. (actually, I specify 94 or 95 pesos, because there is a 5 peso fee added, so the total is under my 100 peso balance) However, now when I try to initiate the Pasa Tiempo transfer right after having purchased 100 pesos of credits (and thus having a 100 peso paid credits balance), I get this message: "Estimado usuario para poder realizar tu solicitud es necesario tengas registrado un monto minimo en recargas de $50 info en www.telcel.com/pasatiempo " (Google translate: ""Dear user to be able to make your request is necessary to have registered a minimum amount of $ 50 info reloads at www.telcel.com/pasatiempo ") At first I thought, "well, maybe what this means is I now have to keep a minimum of 50 pesos balance in my paid credits, since I already purchased 100 pesos." So I tried transferring 45 or 44 pesos, so that I'd still have a 50 peso balance after the 44 peso transfer plus the 5 peso fee. Didn't help, I still get the message. Has anyone else encountered this problem? This is the first time I've had a problem with the Pasa Tiempo transfer system. On the website, there are two different sets of rules for Pasa Tiempo. One if for "PasaTiempo de Amigo a Amigo", which is what I have, a simple package, no contract or "plan", you just buy 100 pesos of credit every 59 days to keep the phone alive. (The other is for "PasaTiempo de Plan a Amigo".) The example they gave on the website seems straightforward: "Por ejemplo, si deseas enviar $200, deberás contar con por lo menos $205 de Saldo Amigo." (Google translate: "For example, if you want to send $ 200, you must have at least $ 205 of Friend Balance.") Thanks for your time.
  7. Just for those who are trying to find his office: Saw the place the other day. No big sign on the garage. But there's a little sign, easy to miss. If it helps: Address is 106 Carretera Poniente. North side of the Carretera, and as mentioned -- on the lateral.
  8. From what I understand, there's no sign outside. If that's true, I wonder why?
  9. Sure enough, an odd charge appeared on his Telmex bill. Examining his past bills, he found a number of odd charges, ranging from 90 pesos to 200 pesos. Some were labeled "Salud" or health insurance. Another was labeled "emergency health call". I think there was at least one odd charge per month. He said Telmex was very good and helpful (they pretty much have to be since they are the ones who “provide” their clients’ phone number lists to third parties). He was refunded immediately for the extra charges. And those particular charges were blocked. However, they said there will probably be other charges in the future, as a number of companies are using these phone # lists.
  10. I'm writing this on behalf of a friend of mine. He received a phone call purportedly from Telmex, conducting a "customer satisfaction" survey. He was asked a series of questions over a 20 minute period regarding his Telmex internet service. The caller said that Telmex is now replacing modems every three to six months, and that a repairman will be visiting the next week to do the replacement. Because he was asked no obviously personal security questions such as for account numbers and passwords, etc., and the caller ID indicated a local (same area code) call, and because the caller had spent so much time on the survey, he felt it was probably legitimate, possibly due to the increased competition in the area, i.e., Telmex was trying to improve their service. However, he still had some reservations, so he called Telmex customer service. He was informed that Telmex never does long questionnaires over the phone, that at most they would call using an automated-voice system that asks 5 questions. Also, Telmex does not have a three to six month modem replacement policy. The Telmex rep speculated that what the scammers might be doing is to record the entire 20 minute conversation and then later splice and edit my friend's voice to possibly order some insurance that shows up on the Telmex bill. (For example, the caller would ask him to repeat his name and address, etc., to "verify" it's correct.) She said if an insurance charge shows up on the bill, to come in and it would be removed. P.S. The conversation was entirely in Spanish. It is not known if the caller speaks English.
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