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AlanMexicali

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Everything posted by AlanMexicali

  1. You assumptions are sometimes so dumb it is hard to follow them. Example: Here you friviously accuse me of hating southerners when the only person I was making fun of was you. How is it that you seem obsessed with making dumb comparisions sometimes. Is it just another insult or does your mind actually work that way sometimes?
  2. Do you really believe anyone cannot see through your dribble like your last few posts? We all can. You are transparent and very common. Not witty or unique. Nothing is easier to spot than someone with low self esteem and resentment of others more mentally healthier than they are. Grow up and take responsibility for your behavior here.
  3. Pathetic response to a sincere thoughful reply to your incorrect accusations. Pitiful - just Pitiful.
  4. Aww poor little baby. Big bad baby boomers who don't like conspiracy theories and right wing propaganda were mean to you since you arrived. Now we are suffering for our intolerance at the hands of you. Believe it or not we can take it and deal with it accordingly as it comes our way. All of it: your excessive boasting; conspiracy theories, right wing propaganda; mean spiritedness and any other nasty things you feel we deserve for hurting your fellings. Here. Hope this helps you get through these terrible inflictions brought upon yourself and those you didn't deserve when some mean baby boomer went way over the line.
  5. Total ignorant BS. Nobody did anything other than go through the learning curve of a new unknown before Worldwide situation and your ignorant finger pointing is obviously your own very deep prejuices and total lack of knowledge of any scientific process. Resenting my baby boomer generation is what your motivation for being on a retired in Mexico forum is all about and why you are so very rude to us and spew tons of disinformation like you are actually entitled to do so here and not get a slap aside your inflated head for actually doing it. Then when you do get busted you whin and insult us baby boomers because you find out daily you are NOT entitled but want to be Karen.
  6. Poor attempt to disinform us. Pathetic. Dig deeper; OK? Teachers? Two teachers. That is what two teachers think not any other teachers. Proves nothing at all. The article is about school safety after the Uvalde school mass murder. "Since then, the question of basic safety has also come back into sharp focus after the Uvalde, Texas school shooting last month. So, how are teachers reflecting on the year that was and the future ahead? We caught up with Reinholdt; Suzen Polk-Hoffses, a pre-K teacher in Milbridge, Maine; and Tiki Boyea-Logan, a 4th grade teacher in Rowlett, Texas, to hear their thoughts."
  7. At the very least you are honest enough to admit you get what you deserve and ask for. It is just that your posts completely lack sophistication and acceptable limits of etiquette like others' posters. Hillbilly stuff. IMO
  8. Your unscientic opinion pales in comparision to the scientific facts. In fact they are wrong. Your peer cannot be trusted. I trust credencialed scientists like Yale Medical scientists. https://www.yalemedicine.org/news/covid-19-variants-of-concern-omicron "One thing we know for sure about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is that it is changing constantly. Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve seen a number of prominent variants, including Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron. Omicron and BA.2 There’s still a lot to learn about Omicron (BA.1) and its subvariants. One of those subvariants, BA.2, surpassed the original Omicron strain in March, only to be replaced by BA.2.12.1, another spinoff. In early June, two other Omicron subvariants, BA.4 and BA.5 were estimated by the CDC to make up 13% of new cases, up from 7.5% only a week before. The original Omicron strain was first identified in Botswana and South Africa in late November 2021, and cases quickly began to surface and multiply in other countries. By December, Omicron was causing daily case numbers in the U.S. to skyrocket to over a million. Can vaccination prevent it? The CDC says that while breakthrough infections in vaccinated people are expected, getting vaccinated and staying up to date with your vaccine and a booster shot is the best protection against Omicron. In March, while data was still emerging about how long the first booster shot will last, the U.S. approved second booster shots of one of the mRNA vaccines for adults ages 50 and older—and all adults who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and booster—giving them the option of choosing a fourth shot. A similar authorization was made for people with certain immune deficiencies. Family Health BY KATHY KATELLA JUNE 8, 2022 A quick guide to the coronavirus variants that are top-of-mind right now. [Originally published: Dec. 10, 2021. Updated: June 8, 2022]Note: Information in this article was accurate at the time of original publication. Because information about COVID-19 changes rapidly, we encourage you to visit the websites of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and your state and local government for the latest information.One thing we know for sure about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is that it is changing constantly. Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve seen a number of prominent variants, including Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron. Although new variants are an expected part of the evolution of viruses, monitoring each one that surfaces is essential in ensuring we—in the U.S. and globally—are prepared. This is especially true if a new variant is more aggressive, highly transmissible, vaccine-resistant, able to cause more severe disease—or all of the above, compared with the original strain of the virus.The World Health Organization (WHO) names new coronavirus variants using the letters of the Greek alphabet, starting with the Alpha variant, which emerged in 2020.Below is a list of—and information about—some of the variants that have been top-of-mind. Omicron and BA.2There’s still a lot to learn about Omicron (BA.1) and its subvariants. One of those subvariants, BA.2, surpassed the original Omicron strain in March, only to be replaced by BA.2.12.1, another spinoff. In early June, two other Omicron subvariants, BA.4 and BA.5 were estimated by the CDC to make up 13% of new cases, up from 7.5% only a week before. The original Omicron strain was first identified in Botswana and South Africa in late November 2021, and cases quickly began to surface and multiply in other countries. By December, Omicron was causing daily case numbers in the U.S. to skyrocket to over a million. The Omicron subvariants have appeared to spread more easily than their predecessor. While early data has shown Omicron infections to be milder than previous variants, they have still caused hospitalizations and deaths, and scientists are still studying this.How contagious is it? Omicron is more transmissible than Delta was—very early reports from South Africa showed cases rising rapidly from 300 a day to 3,000 a day over a two-week period. Omicron’s subvariants are considered to be even more efficient spreaders of the disease. One explanation is that more than 30 of Omicron’s mutations are on the virus’s spike protein, the part that attaches to human cells, and several of those are believed to increase the probability of infection. So, part of Omicron’s enhanced transmissibility may come from its ability to evade some immune responses, especially in individuals who were previously infected but not vaccinated. Severity: Data has suggested that Omicron is less severe, in general, than previous variants, according to the CDC. But it also says more data is needed to fully understand this variant’s potential to cause severe illness, hospitalization, and death, which can still occur. The CDC has noted that surges in cases may lead to significant increases in hospitalizations and deaths, as they did during the variant’s spread in the beginning of the year, when the estimated death rates went as high or higher than they were at the time of the Delta variant surge last autumn. More recently increases in Omicron infections were accompanied by a new increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations.Can vaccination prevent it? The CDC says that while breakthrough infections in vaccinated people are expected, getting vaccinated and staying up to date with your vaccine and a booster shot is the best protection against Omicron. In March, while data was still emerging about how long the first booster shot will last, the U.S. approved second booster shots of one of the mRNA vaccines for adults ages 50 and older—and all adults who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and booster—giving them the option of choosing a fourth shot. A similar authorization was made for people with certain immune deficiencies. DeltaDelta (B.1.617.2) was first identified in India in late 2020; it soon spread throughout the world, becoming what was the predominant version of the coronavirus—until Omicron took its place in mid-December. How contagious is it? It’s estimated that Delta caused more than twice as many infections as previous variants—in Connecticut, it was estimated to have been 80 to 90% more transmissible than the Alpha variant. In the U.S., in June 2021, after a steady decline in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, the arrival of Delta coincided with a rapid reversal of that trend. In the fall of 2021, there were surges even in the most vaccinated states, prompting experts to urge people to get their booster shots.Severity: Delta caused more severe disease than other variants in people who weren’t vaccinated. Early studies from Scotland and Canada, both cited by the CDC, suggested Delta was more likely to result in hospitalization in the unvaccinated. A report in the Lancet this past summer found that people in England had double the hospitalization risk with Delta than they did with Alpha, the previously dominant variant in that country. Can vaccination prevent it? All three vaccines in the U.S. were considered highly effective against severe illness, hospitalizations, and death from Delta. No vaccine is 100% effective, and Delta caused breakthrough infections in some fully vaccinated people. Also, infected vaccinated people could spread the virus to others, although likely they were infectious for a shorter time. Delta also prompted the CDC to recommend “layered prevention strategies” for both the vaccinated and the unvaccinated. That means that, in addition to staying up-to-date with their vaccines, people were advised to practice such strategies as washing hands, wearing masks, and maintaining a physical distance from one another, especially when indoors in places where there was substantial or high transmission."
  9. Ageism is another ignorant persons way of feeling good about their tainted outlook on life. Also shows you got no jams. Only insults and boasting about your past.
  10. "lol you guys are still at it and it's great comedy." Actually you are a great comedy that knows no bounds.[still being yourself(ish)] IMO “Self-centered people often steer conversations to revolve around themselves and they tend to get bored when the focus isn’t on them.” – Unknown “Childish is not being playful and innocent, childish is when you can’t understand others, always try to pick on others, trying to impose your negativity on others, being self centered and judgmental! No, that’s not even childish, that’s immature, children deserve much more standard than immature people!” – Unknown “Toxic people you should just get rid of: Those who spread negativity. Those who criticize you all the time. Those who waste your time. Those who are jealous. Those who play the victim. Those who don’t care. Those who are self-centered. Those who keep disappointing you.” – Unknown
  11. https://www.reuters.com/world/india/india-govt-wont-buy-pfizer-moderna-vaccines-amid-local-output-sources-2021-09-21/ "September 21, 20218:12 AM CDTLast Updated 9 months ago India India govt won't buy Pfizer, Moderna vaccines amid local output -sources By Neha Arora , Krishna N. Das and Aftab Ahmed 2 minute read 1/2 A woman speaks inside a waiting zone area at a health clinic where COVID-19 vaccination is being given to healthcare workers in Kolkata, India, February 1, 2021. REUTERS/Rupak De Chowdhuri Read More "NEW DELHI, Sept 21 (Reuters) - India's government will not buy COVID-19 shots from Pfizer (PFE.N)/BioNTech (22UAy.DE) and Moderna (MRNA.O), three government sources told Reuters, mainly because domestic output of more affordable and easier-to-store vaccines has jumped. That essentially means the globally popular vaccines, which their makers have pledged not to sell to private parties during the pandemic, will not be available for now in the world's two most populous countries - China and India. Advertisement · Scroll to continue The Indian government has also declined to meet the U.S. companies' requests for legal protection over any side-effects from the use of their shots, which are currently made only in the United States or Europe, two of the sources said."
  12. https://www.yalemedicine.org/news/covid-19-variants-of-concern-omicron "One thing we know for sure about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is that it is changing constantly. Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve seen a number of prominent variants, including Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron. Omicron and BA.2 There’s still a lot to learn about Omicron (BA.1) and its subvariants. One of those subvariants, BA.2, surpassed the original Omicron strain in March, only to be replaced by BA.2.12.1, another spinoff. In early June, two other Omicron subvariants, BA.4 and BA.5 were estimated by the CDC to make up 13% of new cases, up from 7.5% only a week before. The original Omicron strain was first identified in Botswana and South Africa in late November 2021, and cases quickly began to surface and multiply in other countries. By December, Omicron was causing daily case numbers in the U.S. to skyrocket to over a million. Can vaccination prevent it? The CDC says that while breakthrough infections in vaccinated people are expected, getting vaccinated and staying up to date with your vaccine and a booster shot is the best protection against Omicron. In March, while data was still emerging about how long the first booster shot will last, the U.S. approved second booster shots of one of the mRNA vaccines for adults ages 50 and older—and all adults who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and booster—giving them the option of choosing a fourth shot. A similar authorization was made for people with certain immune deficiencies. Family Health BY KATHY KATELLA JUNE 8, 2022 A quick guide to the coronavirus variants that are top-of-mind right now. [Originally published: Dec. 10, 2021. Updated: June 8, 2022]Note: Information in this article was accurate at the time of original publication. Because information about COVID-19 changes rapidly, we encourage you to visit the websites of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC), World Health Organization (WHO), and your state and local government for the latest information.One thing we know for sure about SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, is that it is changing constantly. Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve seen a number of prominent variants, including Alpha, Beta, Delta, and Omicron. Although new variants are an expected part of the evolution of viruses, monitoring each one that surfaces is essential in ensuring we—in the U.S. and globally—are prepared. This is especially true if a new variant is more aggressive, highly transmissible, vaccine-resistant, able to cause more severe disease—or all of the above, compared with the original strain of the virus.The World Health Organization (WHO) names new coronavirus variants using the letters of the Greek alphabet, starting with the Alpha variant, which emerged in 2020.Below is a list of—and information about—some of the variants that have been top-of-mind. Omicron and BA.2There’s still a lot to learn about Omicron (BA.1) and its subvariants. One of those subvariants, BA.2, surpassed the original Omicron strain in March, only to be replaced by BA.2.12.1, another spinoff. In early June, two other Omicron subvariants, BA.4 and BA.5 were estimated by the CDC to make up 13% of new cases, up from 7.5% only a week before. The original Omicron strain was first identified in Botswana and South Africa in late November 2021, and cases quickly began to surface and multiply in other countries. By December, Omicron was causing daily case numbers in the U.S. to skyrocket to over a million. The Omicron subvariants have appeared to spread more easily than their predecessor. While early data has shown Omicron infections to be milder than previous variants, they have still caused hospitalizations and deaths, and scientists are still studying this.How contagious is it? Omicron is more transmissible than Delta was—very early reports from South Africa showed cases rising rapidly from 300 a day to 3,000 a day over a two-week period. Omicron’s subvariants are considered to be even more efficient spreaders of the disease. One explanation is that more than 30 of Omicron’s mutations are on the virus’s spike protein, the part that attaches to human cells, and several of those are believed to increase the probability of infection. So, part of Omicron’s enhanced transmissibility may come from its ability to evade some immune responses, especially in individuals who were previously infected but not vaccinated. Severity: Data has suggested that Omicron is less severe, in general, than previous variants, according to the CDC. But it also says more data is needed to fully understand this variant’s potential to cause severe illness, hospitalization, and death, which can still occur. The CDC has noted that surges in cases may lead to significant increases in hospitalizations and deaths, as they did during the variant’s spread in the beginning of the year, when the estimated death rates went as high or higher than they were at the time of the Delta variant surge last autumn. More recently increases in Omicron infections were accompanied by a new increase in COVID-19 hospitalizations.Can vaccination prevent it? The CDC says that while breakthrough infections in vaccinated people are expected, getting vaccinated and staying up to date with your vaccine and a booster shot is the best protection against Omicron. In March, while data was still emerging about how long the first booster shot will last, the U.S. approved second booster shots of one of the mRNA vaccines for adults ages 50 and older—and all adults who got the Johnson and Johnson vaccine and booster—giving them the option of choosing a fourth shot. A similar authorization was made for people with certain immune deficiencies. DeltaDelta (B.1.617.2) was first identified in India in late 2020; it soon spread throughout the world, becoming what was the predominant version of the coronavirus—until Omicron took its place in mid-December. How contagious is it? It’s estimated that Delta caused more than twice as many infections as previous variants—in Connecticut, it was estimated to have been 80 to 90% more transmissible than the Alpha variant. In the U.S., in June 2021, after a steady decline in COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, the arrival of Delta coincided with a rapid reversal of that trend. In the fall of 2021, there were surges even in the most vaccinated states, prompting experts to urge people to get their booster shots.Severity: Delta caused more severe disease than other variants in people who weren’t vaccinated. Early studies from Scotland and Canada, both cited by the CDC, suggested Delta was more likely to result in hospitalization in the unvaccinated. A report in the Lancet this past summer found that people in England had double the hospitalization risk with Delta than they did with Alpha, the previously dominant variant in that country. Can vaccination prevent it? All three vaccines in the U.S. were considered highly effective against severe illness, hospitalizations, and death from Delta. No vaccine is 100% effective, and Delta caused breakthrough infections in some fully vaccinated people. Also, infected vaccinated people could spread the virus to others, although likely they were infectious for a shorter time. Delta also prompted the CDC to recommend “layered prevention strategies” for both the vaccinated and the unvaccinated. That means that, in addition to staying up-to-date with their vaccines, people were advised to practice such strategies as washing hands, wearing masks, and maintaining a physical distance from one another, especially when indoors in places where there was substantial or high transmission."
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