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tkessler

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tkessler last won the day on April 11

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About tkessler

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  • Location
    Guadalajara and Ajijic
  • Interests
    Computers, Wine, Tom's and Rexes bar, energy efficiency, dynamic carpooling.

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  1. So glad to hear Jojana. About 50% of the cases I see its not in their court. Which is why patience and courtesy have to rule. When they do, the problems always get solved.
  2. Give them a day or so to verify the modem. Thats certainly what they´re doing.
  3. Did you write the noc@mail.ilox.mx and describe the problem? That is the preferred customer service path. If they installed the modem on Monday and verfified service, the ball is probably in your court.
  4. A contract with your ISP has rights and obligations for both sides. But you wouldn´t think that from many of the posts in this thread. If your service isn´t working to your satisfaction, there's an even or better chance the issue is on your side.. I´ve seen mis-adressed emails, nonpayment, language problems, slow computers and ports, old drivers..It goes on and on. Minimal behavior would be to show some patience and courtesy until the cause of the problem can be determined. The modem is the demarcation point. All ISP´s have a verification process to remotely enter the modem and `perform a check. If the modem passes verification, the ISP is much more limited on what they can do to help. Yet ISP´s receive dozens of calls every day from customers who simply say my service isn´t working and throw the problem to them. The ISP have to deal with it best they can. The reality is, if your service passes verification, the problem is likely on your side. In rare cases, the modem can pass verification and still have an issue, resolved by swapping out. Some customers take this to the extreme. If the ISP concludes the customer won´t be satisfied under any reasonable circumstance, as a last resort they´ll terminate the contract and refund the money. Stores do that too, at least reputable ones. There is no breach of contract. They´re honoring the contract.
  5. I haven't heard that declaration. But I think it depends upon the gated community. If the members are going to endlessly debate and make it an uphill battle, Ilox won't want to deal with it. Check out Las Quintas. They grabbed the bull by the horns. Craig Rule, the lead in that development, sat down with the Ilox engineers,, got the requirements, used his maintenance people to do all the infrastructure for a song...I think it ended up being something like 200-300 dlls per home. Now all 14 homes of them there have high speed fiber.. Done. By the way, do you know what that does to home values? Rental ease? Honestly Bedbug, I don't know what people are smoking to have to debate this. Even if you are in a modern development where Telmex tied up the ducts, it probably makes sense to tear up the streets and put in decent fiber. From a real estate value point of view. Just don't put the onus on Ilox...They'll come to the entrance of the community with the preparation, its up the community members to make the preparations. Tom
  6. I don't disagree with Computer Guy...the communications and customer service is not ready for prime time...If all my MX customer in my work answered me promptly and Ilox were the only one who didn't, I'd think its Ilox. But with rare exception a lot of the country behaves like that...maddening...Maybe its cultural.
  7. I'll offer my two cents here: - For everyone who is complaining that they prepaid over 18 months ago and the delays have been eternal..understand that we had a pledge period, where you could express your interest without obligation...Once we had enough pledges, we had the prepaid period, where signups were sent vouchers to actually pay. We didn't know if enough people would actually pay until last October, when they had enough and decided to start the project. If you paid last May, like I did, about 6 months of that time was wait and see with no obligation. At 7% percent interest on the roughly 15000 pesos for 6 months, you're out 500 pesos. So sorry, but Ilox wanted to see some skin in the game from the local community before committing to an FTTH installation. I knew of no other way to get them in...We're not in the US. Small communities there have worse problems trying to get broadband. But we did it...They're here. And their service is quite good. When they decided to start the project, they had to site their offices and concentrator installation. Ajijic real estate prices turned out to be sky high, it took them a couple of extra months to get that sorted out....They finally got the office in Buganvilias arranged and concluded they couldn't put the truck depot in Ajijic....I know, its not your problem...But we did it...They're here. - We are in early October and as a practical matter things started rolling in January of this year. Its been 9 months, they said 6 for all the prepaids. Sorry things are running late. But they do have most of the original prepaids covered now. -If all the folks in San Antonio and Riberas hadn't left for the summer, Ilox would have done their installs first. But when they tried, their newly hired crews kept firing on 2 cylinders..so they said to heck with that and adjusted their plans to keep their crews busy, which included mixing recent signups with prepaids. Raquet Club was an area with a high density of prepaid signups, it was one they had to jump on as a salvation to their crew utilization problem. We weren't anticipating that and it didn't look great for keeping promises, but they have a business to run and that's the explanation. They are now all over San Antonio, Riberas, Chula Vistas....We did it. They're here. - The areas beyond Raquet Club like Las Fuentes, etc..I don't know if you've driven it...it is way out there...Ilox installs are in three stages..First they have to prep the cables to the area...then the branch cables to the boxes, and then finally drop to the houses. I know they are in the first stage to Las Fuentes...After they finish up San Antonio area they'll work on that area...And then most of the original lakeside area will be done. - I have dealt with dozens of complaints about service, refunds, etc and have found most or all of them to be unsubstantiated. 99% of the time a nice email to the NOC will resolve the problem. I've seen: mail delivery problems, unclear refund requests, language issue, customer side technical issues, misunderstanding of speed tests...it goes on and on. In every case, showing just a bit more empathy and drilling down on the problem can solve it. lox is not Telmex..there are some subtleties. They'll assign you a private IP address by default unless you request a public one, which can screw up streaming. That's due to a global shortage of public IP addresses. Their routers often block interport communication, so you need to put all of your network on one switch and run just one cable to the Ilox router. They don't allow you to do much on the router like open ports, but they'll do practically anything you request via a mail to the NOC. All of these are basically just prudent business practices for a small ISP that doesn't want to their tech support choked with a bunch of trivia. If you can't deal with this, get yourself a decent computer guy who can help you before you put it all on Ilox. Tom
  8. You can sign up for the Ilox double or triple 250 which will give you 250 Mb down and 75 up, fiber to the home (FTTH). They installed mine in Rancho del Oro in May and I routinely get 450 Mb down and 100 up. Best to speed test on fast.com which gives the best representation of your ISP's speed. Fast.com are netflix servers on your ISP's boundary. Speedtest.net will return a result that shows not just your ISP but transit networks also in the path to the server. When you install fiber, need to be careful that you have a recent PC, Gb network connection, don't test over Wifi, or you'll get unrepresentative readings. Ilox crews moved to into San Antonio /Riberas / Chula Vista area a few weeks ago and have begun installing. They are running a few months behind the original plan, but things are now moving along just fine.
  9. Thats right, I have very little outbound on Callcentric...$0.02 a minute not much of an expense even if I had a lot!
  10. Many years ago I took the Mexican exam and was issued XE1KG...operated for many years but then it expired and the government stopped regulating it. I believe there are a lot of people operating under the radar, just need to be discreet about it.
  11. I use a callcentric.com Voip line with a Grandstream HT801 adapter you can buy on MercadoLibre in Mexico for $50. When someone calls my US number, it rings the GDL and Ajijic house and my MX cell simultaneously. About $3 a month.
  12. The intent in my answers is to provide information that helps people make informed decisions on their choices. Folks should know the advantages of fiber over other mediums and have a basic understanding of the issues related to streaming. I fail to see how answers that don't facilitate that are helpful.
  13. Mark, I still don't get it. Your comments are so generic as to be useless. By not differentiating the clear advantages of fiber, you did put it into the same category of other mediums. Yes, I suppose if all subscribers wanted to transmit at maximum velocity simultaneously, it might stress even modern day routers. But you are ignoring the improvement in semiconductors that have vastly improved the throughput of fiber and routers to the point where there are few practical bottlenecks. https://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978-3-319-31903-2_8 On bottlenecks, there are two types of Internet traffic among the carriers. Transit and peering. Transit happens when an ISP pays another to carry its traffic. Peering is when two networks agree to exchange traffic at no charge or the provider covers the cost. Ilox is a small carrier that pays other networks to transit its traffic. As described here: https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/isp-peering-high-speed-internet-slow/ They also peer with Google, Facebook, and Netflix. Now is it clear why those services always work well? . For residential service, you bet they have to throttle bandwidth at some point or their business case would go out the window in transit charges. But, they try to make sure fiber subscribers get reasonable quality of service commensurate with their speed. If you want better than that, there's something called SLA, service level agreement, where they start guaranteeing throughput. In general, if you are seeing streaming problems on non-peered networks, it could be Ilox limiting peak throughput through a Cogent that they have to pay (unlikely but possible), a transit carrier, or even your provider. If you've got a cheap service, you might be getting what you pay for.
  14. I have no idea why Mark puts fiber in the same category as other mediums. Fiber is superior. Immunity to electrical interference and weather degradation, and higher speeds are the main differences, along with lower maintenance costs. Your Ilox box, called an ONT, operates on two different wavelengths and each transmits at about 1.2 Gbps simultaneous in both directions. Because fiber is newer technology, the networks have fewer bottlenecks up to the ISP network boundary. To be fair I imagine Telmex has few hardware bottlenecks these days as well. Their bottlenecks are the DSL segment speeds, dependent on your copper distance. The initial throttling that does occur on fiber depends on the ISP service you contracted. Beyond that, into other networks, where Telmex and Ilox have to pay traffic costs, the oversubscription and degradation of bandwidth begins. It happens mostly at the later stages in the connection up to your destination. Fast.com is the Netflix server at the Ilox boundary. If you speed test there, you should with very rare exception get your contracted speed. I always get mine at 250 mbps, and its gone as high as 750. Make sure you're hardwired on a gigabit port and not on a VPN, not over wifi. When you go to other networks: Depending on the service you can be routed by their peer with: Google, Netflix and Facebook through or direct peers with them- Marcatel if a Mexican network. Cogent, Level 3 or PCCW for international networks. Once you are on those networks, anything can happen.
  15. You´ll have to weigh which crock of BS contains more BS. Telmex ignoring the area for years with no one else willing to invest, or Ilox who did come in on the strength and faith of the prepaids (thanks Carolina!), are running behind, and could be a bit more communicative. I wish I could waive a magic wand and have Ilox communicate more like an NOB company, but alas, we are SOB. In some ways, thats why we all live here. Go figure.
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