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More Liana

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Everything posted by More Liana

  1. CG, is it Monilo or Molina or Molino? My money's on Molino...
  2. Travis, remember? You took me to Fonda Marceva the first time--and I took that picture of the red conga while you were sitting at the table! Jajajaja!
  3. Olive oils from the Ensenada/Valle de Guadalupe region of Baja California: http://santo-tomas.com/productos/aceites/ http://www.ensenada-baja-vacations.com/informacion-sobre-aceite-de-oliva-hecho-en-ensenada-baja-california.html http://www.laventanadeensenada.com/reportajes/info_reportaje.php?id=179&tipo=1 http://www.planetamexico.com.mx/ensenada/aceite+virgen+extra http://guiamexico.com.mx/empresas/aceite-de-oliva-extra-virgen-olibaja-productores-de-aceite-de-oliva.html http://olivarerabajamar.net/Bienvenido http://www.quiminet.com/productos/aceite-de-oliva-virgen-10708043140/proveedores.htm There are more links, if anyone needs more.
  4. Sue, I've been in Mexico for a very long time. My experience is that in order to prove an expense for tax purposes (as a business deduction for oneself) a factura has ALWAYS been required. The electronic factura, on the other hand, has been available for approximately 10 years and has been obligatory since 2014. In December 2016, a new version of the factura electrónica went into effect. For clarity, when you receive a register receipt or a hand-written receipt for an item you purchase, it's called a nota. "Señora, requiere usted una nota?" That sort of receipt acts as proof of purchase if, for example, you need to return an item to the store where you bought it. If you require an official government tax-deductible receipt, or (for example) if your insurance provider requires that level of receipt, that's a factura. "Caballero, requiere usted factura?" To further clarify, when you receive your Telmex, CFE, or other bill, that piece of paper is a recibo.
  5. The answer to many questions is, "It depends." https://www.quora.com/Is-Central-America-part-of-North-America-1
  6. Chedraui was never owned by a French company. At one time, Carrefour (a French company) was active in Mexico. Carrefour Mexico was purchased and incorporated into its brand by Chedraui in 2007. I posted the history on June 29.
  7. When did geographers do away with Central America?
  8. Wouldn't it be better to support a Mexican product, one that's raised and produced here? After all, Mexico gave vanilla to the world. Real Mexican vanilla is excellent.
  9. SPAM ALERT. Just as cafemediterraneo said, it's hlonghlong. Where is a moderator when you need one?
  10. You might Google around for olive oil from Baja California, where it is extensively produced in the Ensenada area.
  11. The drink in the photo is a delicious, refreshing, conga, as served at Fonda Marceva, Abasolo 455, Morelia, Michoacán. More here: http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/mexico_cooks/2008/10/index.html
  12. Chedraui is entirely a Mexican-owned store, not French. The now enormous chain was founded in Veracruz, in 1927, by Lázaro Chedraui Chaya, a Mexican of Lebanese descent. The current president of the company is Antonio Chedraui Obeso, assisted by his son. In 2007, the Chedraui company bought out the supermarket chain Carrefour, making Chedraui Mexico's third-largest retailer, behind WalMart and Soriana.
  13. Camille, in case there are no kidney beans, I've been using La Costeña canned whole bayo beans for making chili. They're not quite the same color, but they work really well--and they're always available, at any grocery store.
  14. If you have free time and are interested in a traditional food market tour in Mexico City, PM me, MC.
  15. The exorbitantly high taxi price from the hotel is usually because one doesn't know that hotel cabs--the ones that are parked either in or near the hotel driveway--cost an arm and a leg. Hence the 200 pesos. Next time, walk a block away from the hotel and hail a cab on the street. Or install Uber on your cell phone before leaving the GDL area and call for an Uber--very inexpensive and very secure.
  16. Kelly Blue Book Mexico, online. https://www.kbb.com/carros-usados/
  17. Amanda mentioned that she has Asperger's Syndrome and doesn't make friends easily. Maybe one or more of you who have responded would like to meet Amanda for coffee. Amanda, I live in Mexico City so can't meet you. Best wishes in making new friends at Lakeside!
  18. Hybridizing is a process that occurs naturally. GMO is genetic manipulation of an organism in a laboratory. Please read: https://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/hybrid-seeds-vs-gmos
  19. This is exactly what is found in the USA in the summer. Try it. No elote (the tender, young corn as you describe it in the quote here) is as tender and sweet as this mature corn. This variety is a USA open-pollinated yellow hybrid, Zea mays convar. saccharata var. rugosa. Actually, an associate and I have been invited to Baja California at the end of July, to give a 10-day series of sponsored conferences about native Mexican corns and ancient pre-conquest sustainable farming techniques. Despite the fact that corn originated in Mexico, certain hybrids (including Zea mays convar. saccharata var. rugosa) were hybridized (and continue to be further hybridized) in the United States. This particular hybrid originated in the state of Illinois. http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/mexico_cooks/2016/10/corn-an-ancient-gift-from-mexico-to-feed-the-world.html
  20. That sweet corn in the three-pack is grown in the states of Guanajuato and Querétaro. Here it is unpackaged, about 2 weeks ago in a huge mountain in the Pátzcuaro municipal market.
  21. The difficulties with with Volaris include (a) extra charge for choosing a seat, (b) serious luggage restrictions and extra charges, (c) hours-late departures, etc. Most recently a flight from GDL to CDMX left GDL over two hours late. Friends have experienced last-minute flight cancellations with no consideration for replacement flights. At one time, I booked a ticket per Volaris instructions. At the airport, the airline refused to honor the ticket I had paid for. Volaris refused to reimburse me for the ticket. They refunded the ticket price only after I contacted PROFECO. When Carlos Slim owned 25% of Volaris, the airline was reliable with good service. The minute he sold his shares, service and response plummeted.
  22. If it were me, I'd get a flight from Portland to LA on whatever least-expensive airline will get you there. Then fly INTERJET (http://www.interjet.com.mx) from LA direct to Guadalajara. Interjet is worlds better than Volaris: the planes are new, the legroom is great, and the lowest price (I just checked--one way, one person LA to GDL) is $193.00 USD. If you have more than 25 kilos of luggage per person, there are low-cost options for bringing more.
  23. As many of you know, I started my professional culinary life as a Chinese chef--way back in the early 1970s--specializing in Szechuan and Hunan regional cooking. I've traveled throughout Mexico and have lived for long periods in Tijuana, Ajijic, Guadalajara, Morelia, and now Mexico City. I've eaten in more Chinese restaurants in Mexico than I can count. IMHO there are exactly two Chinese restaurants in Mexico City that are worth the money and the calories to eat in. The owners of one refuse to allow any publicity about it--no photos, no reviews, no nothing. The other is this one, where I eat about once a month and where I often take people who are looking for real Chinese food: http://mexicocooks.typepad.com/mexico_cooks/2014/06/restaurante-jing-teng-a-taste-of-hong-kong-in-mexico-city.html We're fortunate in Mexico City to have ready sources for most fresh Chinese produce (bitter melon, long beans, two or three kinds of baby bok choy, and lots of etc) as well as an entire shop at the corner of that produce market where I find many kinds of rice, 15 kinds of soy sauce, rice noodles in every size, canned and bottled goods straight from the Mainland, and cooking utensils (including bamboo steamers, different styles of woks, and plenty of etc). The ONLY thing I haven't found that I'd like to find is thick soy, and the owner of that shop has promised that he will order it for me when I need it. This: The so-called Barrio Chino (Chinatown) in Mexico City's downtown is a joke; today, there are maybe three, maybe four restaurants of dubious quality in that 2-block zone. The REAL Chinatown in Mexico City is far off the tourist path. 80% of the population of that huge colonia (neighborhood) are Chinese, and there are small Chinese grocery stores in several places in that area. There's one grocery store in the area that carries items I've never seen elsewhere in Mexico, one being wheat starch, used for making har gow (shrimp dumpling) wrappers and a few other kinds of dim sum wrappers. Want to come eat with me? Pick a date and let's go! Come for a weekend--Sundays are always best, 11:00AM is the best time--the place is packed and chaotic, all Chinese customers. We'll eat dim sum till we can't hold more--and then order from the menu.
  24. CHILLIN, I'd be very interested to know what information convinced you of both of these things. Could you give me some hard facts on which you base your convictions? Thanks!
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