Jump to content
Chapala.com Webboard

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/02/2020 in all areas

  1. Seeing how some people wear their mask has explained to me why contraception sometimes fails.
    4 points
  2. My car was in for service so I rode the bus from Jocotepec to Ajijic and back. Less than half the people on the bus wore masks or even had them. Many people who did have a mask wore it on their chins. The driver on both buses had no mask. I am not making a judgement nor a complaint, just a warning.....if you don't want to be in close contact with people who do not wear masks....then you might consider not riding the local buses.
    3 points
  3. Bisbee with respect I think you are coming from the wrong direction when you suggest the home owner opt for a temporary rental, please do not lose sight of who is to blame. Your/mine/The City;’s actions have consequences These people did not move in after the dog pound was there, the city decided in their wisdom to open this facility. If you think the city will take any action if the local residence "move" you must been crazy. The pressure must be kept up... its a question who will blink first. There must be acres of land available in the boonies east of Chapala going towards the Golf Club. I don't know if it my imagination but there seems to be more folks this year having more animals in their private homes with total disregard for the noise the dogs make when they leave the house etc. Everyone with dogs should appreciate that their choices have consequences. Please respect that everyone does not like animals. I fail to understand why people have to inflict their "pets" on other people Last week coming along the highway in Ribera’s , a stray tried to cross the road, first it was hit by a car going West and then by a car going East. This incident really makes me feel sick and angry at the irresponsible owner Yes as mentioned, some years back dear Geoff Kay had good intentions and permission to have a "Dog pound" on Calle Margarita in Ribera’s. I think he was limited to have 12 dogs, which he ignored, and like the place under discussion nobody was no one there at night and the dogs barked and barked. Then when that subject was posted on this board you had folks who lived in Ajijic make ridicules comments...but they were not there at night. Please stay focus were the blame and responsibility lay
    3 points
  4. Why are you sayng that they are not trying to find them homes??? A few of the dogs have been flown North thanks to Bonevoyage Other Shelters have helped with some They post the dogs available for adoption and some they have in foster homes getting fully vetted to make them adoptable.They are the new kids on the street and do not have the years of established volunteers willing to walk them etc give them a chance or better yet help them. These dogs have all been rescued from horrific conditions right here in the Chapala tax area. A decent community would be reaching a hand out too help.
    2 points
  5. What my ex, who is a carpenter, used to call idjit tax.
    2 points
  6. Bisbee are you saying don't fix the problem, just move out of your home. that does not solve the problem and makes the victims pay the price i say, find a way to move the shelter or close it down I see no effort being made by the shelter to find homes for these animals
    2 points
  7. Recent article in NY Times below. Surprised at the low voter participation by overseas residents....only 7% (the participation rate in 2016 by domestic voters was 60.2%). https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/28/smarter-living/american-vote-from-abroad.html Are You an American Voting From Abroad? Here’s How to Do It The pandemic has made it more complicated to vote from overseas this year, so it’s best to do it early. Voters from some states need to be extra careful. By Jennifer Jett Aug. 28, 2020 Americans in the United States aren’t the only ones worried about how they’ll vote this year. According to the Federal Voting Assistance Program, there are 2.9 million Americans eligible to vote from abroad. But their turnout is consistently low — about 7 percent in the last presidential election in 2016, compared with 60.2 percent domestically. And because of the pandemic, overseas voters face even more obstacles than usual, including global mail disruptions, embassy closures and personal dislocation. It’s still worth making the effort. “Americans overseas are impacted by U.S. legislation, and they often don’t have a voice because even though we’re large in number, we are scattered,” said Kym Kettler-Paddock, communications director for Republicans Overseas. “But the more that we vote, the more people pay attention to our issues regardless of party.” Absentee ballots have decided close races in the past, and this year will be no different, said Julia Bryan, global chairwoman of Democrats Abroad. “People’s votes count, and we vote in consequential places,” she said. “There’s a lot of swing states that we’re sending our votes back to.” It might take a bit more planning this year, but Americans abroad can still ensure they cast votes in November. Here’s how to do it. Request your ballot as early as possible — like, today. If you’re an overseas voter, it’s good practice to fill out a Federal Post Card Application at the start of each calendar year to ensure you’re on the rolls for all primary, general and special elections in your state. (Overseas Americans generally vote in the state where they last lived, even if they no longer have any ties to that location.) But if you haven’t done that yet, it’s not too late. The F.P.C.A. serves as both your ballot request and voter registration. Two websites with tools to help you fill it out and submit it are http://fvap.gov, which is the official U.S. government site, and http://VotefromAbroad.org, a nonpartisan site created by Democrats Abroad. (One advantage of VotefromAbroad.org is it allows you to capture your signature electronically and email the form directly without having to print it first, although voters in some states, including California and New York, are required to sign by hand in any case.) Both sites also have people available to answer your questions. Cutoff dates for requesting your ballot vary by state, but are as early as Oct. 3, so don’t put this off. Do as much online as possible. At a time when both international and U.S. mail services are in a state of disarray, it’s best to avoid them altogether. Submitting your ballot request online is a good start, and it is allowed in almost every state. When you fill out your ballot request, be sure to choose email as the delivery option so you’ll get your ballot as quickly as possible. If you’ve already sent in your request but didn’t ask to receive your ballot by email, you can submit a new one. Every state is required by federal law to make ballots available to overseas voters electronically upon request. But that doesn’t necessarily mean you can use email to send your ballot back. More than 20 states require most overseas voters to return their ballots by mail, including Texas and New York. Voters from these states are most likely to run into problems. “We really want to make sure those voters are leaning forward and can anticipate how they’re going to take action to participate in the election,” said David Beirne, director of the Federal Voting Assistance Program. It is crucial that voters from mail-only states send in their completed ballots well before Election Day on Nov. 3. If you’re worried about using international airmail, one option is to ask your nearest U.S. Embassy or Consulate to send your ballot by diplomatic pouch. But not every embassy is offering this service, delivery could take six weeks or more, and your ballot would still need to wind its way through the U.S. postal system to your local election office. You can also use an express delivery service like FedEx or DHL, but the longer you wait, the more it will cost you. Whichever way you choose, if you have to mail your ballot back, do it as soon as you receive it. Under federal law, election offices are required to send requested ballots to overseas voters at least 45 days before the election, which in this case is Sept. 19. Don’t want to wait that long? You can send a backup ballot now (more on that below). The Military Postal Service Agency has its own list of recommended mailing dates, and service members can get more information from their Installation Voter Assistance Office. Some states, including California and Florida, will accept completed ballots by fax but not email. If you don’t have access to a fax machine, the Federal Voting Assistance Program offers a free email-to-fax service. https://www.votefromabroad.org/faqs/22/ Each state has its own rules, so to make sure you know the exact deadlines and requirements, look yours up here. https://www.votefromabroad.org/states/ (Some state election websites may block overseas users and require a VPN for access.) Stay in touch with your local election official. If you don’t hear from your election official for the state in which you will be voting after you’ve sent your ballot request, contact that person’s office directly to make sure it was received. The same goes for when you return your ballot (you may also be able to track your status online). And if you have questions about your individual situation — for example, if you are back in the U.S. because of the pandemic and are now unable to return to your residence abroad — your local election official is the best person to ask. (And try to be mindful that election offices are facing overwhelming challenges this year.) You can find contact information for your state or local election office here. https://www.fvap.gov/search-offices Have a backup plan. If you don’t receive your ballot by Sept. 19, contact your local election official (check your spam folder, too). In the meantime, you can fill out the Federal Write-In Absentee Ballot, which serves as a backup specifically for overseas voters, and send it by mail, fax or email according to the same rules as your official ballot. Information about the candidates and ballot measures in your area is available through Ballotpedia. If you want to be absolutely sure your vote is counted, send the backup ballot now. Then when your official ballot arrives, send that in as well. If they both arrive before the deadline — which for most states is Election Day — the election office will count only the official ballot, so there’s no need to worry your vote will be double-counted or disqualified. And you can rest easy knowing that not even a pandemic has stopped you from having your say.
    1 point
  8. You're offering the Mexican equivalent of, "Don't listen."
    1 point
  9. You could contact Dr. Justina Jimenez - she is a doctor and a physiotherapist; she has several physiotherapists on staff so perhaps you could make arrangements to have one of them visit. 376-766-5563; I believe they are open 9-3 daily. This lady comes to you home too but she is more massage related
    1 point
  10. In 2006 I downsized my Seattle residence to a very small condo unit half way up the building facing a large hospital across the street. I was in shock the first night I tried to sleep there to be awakened by very loud sirens as the Ambulances brought in patients. And they were and still are much louder than a barking dog. I was sure that I would have to move away. I tried ear plugs, you name it. Nothing worked. Some four months later, I learned how to ignore these sounds and now when I am up north, I don't even hear the sirens. I truly hope that you (all) too, will be able to somehow be able to ignore these loud barking dogs and do as I do and get a great sleep. It can be done.
    1 point
  11. My comment was about the OP's inability to sleep. Continued lack of sleep is a serious problem that affects one's physical and mental health. I hope the neighbors keep up the fight against this shelter and succeed. But if the OP cannot sleep, I still suggest he find a temporary place where he can sleep. Not move out permanently, but just for the evening hours to sleep (saw an ad for a very nice B&B on a quiet street for a monthly rate of $550 USD). Though I leave it to those affected by the noise--some may indeed opt to move permanently (especially renters) and I would not fault them for that decision. Sleep deprivation is a serious health hazard.
    1 point
  12. The dog pound wasn't there, but the city dump was. I remember lots of complaints about the rats. The city can't really be expected to turn its property (in the boonies) into a park every time urban sprawl catches up with it. I can think of a lot of public uses for that property that would make a dog shelter seem benign.
    1 point
  13. Yeast is at Walmart - baking aisle with the cake mixes;
    1 point
  14. I believe Canmex does not have a phone line like we have at Telmex rather he has VOIP or voice over IP or as explained by your friend and mine, Mr. Google "Voice over Internet Protocol, also called IP telephony, is a method and group of technologies for the delivery of voice communications and multimedia sessions over Internet Protocol networks, such as the Internet." canmex, could you be a little bit more detailed as to your internet speed? You know, bits per sec, or Kilobits per sec or Megabits per second when you do a speed test on line? If you do not have a speed/test app, you can always go to www.speedtest.net and left click on GO
    1 point
  15. I have been told that when a customer is a pain in the butt the cost goes way up in hopes they will never be called back again. I am sure that is not true in the OP’s case though. He sounds so nice.
    1 point
  16. It is a good idea to keep your Medicare with A & B, as you may need it on visits to the USA, or when you move back; willingly or not. We moved to Mexico in 2001 and bought a home in Ajijic. We sold that one in 2004 and bought a larger place, in Chapala centro, in 2004. Then, medical issues caught up with us. Care was excellent in Guadalajara hospitals, and with our various doctors, but the frequency began to add up. My wife reached medicare age, I developed more problems, including COPD. That was the straw that broke the camel's back, as I needed a lower elevation to reduce my dependency on oxygen bottles and a concentrator. So, we sold out in 2014 and moved back to the USA, where she uses Medicare and I use the VA. Otherwise, we would have been in trouble at today's prices. Yes, we miss Chapala terribly, but at 72 and 82, we must be very careful as inflation wreaks havoc on those of us who have been retired for 22 years with tiny pensions and SS based upon wages from the last century. Be careful, plan well, keep your options open, and be happy.
    1 point
  17. Sorry to hear about your wallet. FWIW, I lost mine one day about 6 months ago when I was distracted counting my change on a purchase. I slipped my wallet into my back pocket but missed the pocket and it fell to the floor. Later in the afternoon after I realized the wallet was missing, I went back to the last store where I had used it and asked the owner if he had found it. But no luck, so we walked over to the church on the plaza and he asked if they would announce over the public address speakers about the lost wallet. They made the announcement a few times I think. The next day the store owner called me and informed me that the church had my wallet. We walked to the church to retrieve my wallet and all of its contents. Since then I always pack my wallet in my front pocket with my phone, Best of luck to you,
    1 point
  18. And we're putting yo in the same bag as gringos who don't deserve to live here. The answer to your question is, they'll charge you whatever they want you to charge. Didn't you ask how much is was going to be before? No? So, your problem.
    1 point
  19. Interesting, in all of my years here I have never, ever had a stray threaten me. Perhaps you are approaching them in an aggressive manner, it is obvious you do not care for animals to start with.
    1 point
  20. By this statement are you advocating euthanasia? So if all the 'spay and nutter is not working' then why are so many animals sterilized daily. A 3 day clinic can sterilize 170 to over 200 animals (cats & dogs). One of the groups goes to the small communities and gathers up animals to be sterilized. Other groups hold weekend clinics in the surrounding communities. I believe, all the local shelters, sterilize the animals that pass thru their hands. Think of how bad it would be if there weren't active spay and neuter programs going on.
    1 point
  21. Work out the kinks in an unpopulated neighborhood. Dogs unders stress is not good for the dogs or the neighbors This should not be an attempt for a political gain , this is not about politics but about the best for the dogs and the neighborhood
    1 point
  22. There are sterilized/nutered strays about that will take your leg, a hand or your throat should you get between them & their food.
    0 points
  23. Interesting how someone who lives close by does not hear the barking but can say they don't bark all the time. Or do you have selective hearing? Way too many bleeding hearts out there. A needle is fast and effective and inexpensive. All the spay and nutter is not working.
    0 points
×
×
  • Create New...