Jump to content


Photo

Gift for Quinceanera???


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 ohjoni

ohjoni

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:26 PM

Try Easy Off oven cleaner - you may need several applications but it will work. Don't know if it will take off any of the non stick or the pan will be any good at all. And I've heard the same about over heating non-stick pans being toxic. I rarely use them.

We have been invited to a Quinceanera.
Does anyone know what an appropriate gift would be? Do we bring a gift or give money?
Attitude is Everything

#2 elbelgicano

elbelgicano

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chapala centro
  • Interests:being from Belgium, moved here first in 1998, making Belgian chocolate,--- my Mexican miniature Schnauzer, Virginia ... food, languages and culture, volunteering ....
    Making Belgian chocolates --->
    http://chocochef.blogspot.com/
    My (no charge, as a service to community) employment project :
    http://vivachapala.blogspot.mx/

Posted 17 April 2012 - 09:32 PM

Music is so important here, especially for a 15 year old, : ipod, mp3, radio, CD´s, CD player, ..... ??

#3 jrod

jrod

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 806 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:06 AM

We give cash.

#4 elbelgicano

elbelgicano

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,397 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chapala centro
  • Interests:being from Belgium, moved here first in 1998, making Belgian chocolate,--- my Mexican miniature Schnauzer, Virginia ... food, languages and culture, volunteering ....
    Making Belgian chocolates --->
    http://chocochef.blogspot.com/
    My (no charge, as a service to community) employment project :
    http://vivachapala.blogspot.mx/

Posted 18 April 2012 - 09:04 AM

I think that both, cash or gift, are ok. As I mentioned above...., a couple of years ago, we gave a CD player, and that was very much appreciated.

#5 giltner68

giltner68

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 1,856 posts

Posted 18 April 2012 - 09:22 AM

Money worked for me, who knows what a 15 year old wants these days? - other than money.

#6 ohjoni

ohjoni

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 18 April 2012 - 09:28 AM

We give cash.

What would an appropriate amount be?
Attitude is Everything

#7 jrod

jrod

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 806 posts
  • Gender:Male

Posted 18 April 2012 - 11:18 AM

What would an appropriate amount be?


Depends on your relationship with the young lady, goodwill towards family, your finances, and whether or not you participate in some other way towards expenses. Do you know if she is saving for something special (my niece was saving for contact lenses with her quinceañera money...) It's really the gesture and the warmth with which you present it that count more than the amount.

#8 ohjoni

ohjoni

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:08 PM


Depends on your relationship with the young lady, goodwill towards family, your finances, and whether or not you participate in some other way towards expenses. Do you know if she is saving for something special (my niece was saving for contact lenses with her quinceañera money...) It's really the gesture and the warmth with which you present it that count more than the amount.

It is actually our gardener's daughter. He has worked for us for 3 years and we have met her. Very nice family. We are looking forward to attending our first Quinceanera.
Attitude is Everything

#9 LaChula

LaChula

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,366 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Ajijic since 1995

Posted 18 April 2012 - 03:51 PM

It is actually our gardener's daughter. He has worked for us for 3 years and we have met her. Very nice family. We are looking forward to attending our first Quinceanera.



Be sure to stay long enough to see some of the ceremony. The young lady will be very dressed up, and she will have "chambalanes" who are boys (family members, friends) who are also dressed formally. They will each have a chance to dance with her in a waltz (vals) which has been choreographed and practiced. Another custom is when the girl sits on a chair with a doll and someone comes to take it away. The parents come and change her shoes to heels. All symbolic of her growing up. If you go to the church, you will hear that this is her transition from childhood to an adult and her responsibilities to be a good Catholic.
Even families of low economic means make a very big deal about this event, and spend a LOT of money on it. There are madrinas and padrinos of different aspects of the day-someone or a few are madrinas of the dress, for example, others help pay for the flowers, or the liquor, etc.
More Liana, do I have it right?
"He upon whose heart the dust of Mexico has lain will find no peace in any other land." Malcolm Lowry

#10 More Liana

More Liana

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,485 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Mexico City, Mexico
  • Interests:Mexico
    Cultures
    Gastronomy
    Language
    Photography
    The Written Word

Posted 18 April 2012 - 05:26 PM

I would change one single word: Even Especially families of low economic means make a very big deal about this event, and spend a LOT of money on it.

In Mexico's upper classes, the Mass and party and rituals that LaChula mentioned are being replaced with nightclub parties (yes, even at the tender age of 15), cruises, NY and European vacations, and other things in that price range.

At Lakeside, which is rural Mexico, things are still done in a very 'country' way--not a bad thing at all. The quinceañera's dress may be the fanciest she's ever had, her chambelanes wear tails and cravats color-coordinated with the girl's dress, the damas wear special fancy dresses that are also color-coordinated with the quinceañera's dress, there may be live music followed by or alternating with a DJ, there will be a huge party including a big special meal following the Mass--it's all really a lot of fun. One of the most-fun quinceañeras I attended in Ajijic was (at the honoree's request) done all in charro outfits. The lovely 15-year-old wore a cream-color charro jacket and long skirt with gold braid and a wide cream-color sombrero. Her parents wore black and white with typical green, white, and red floppy charro ties; the mother wore a lovely black silk rebozo. The girl's brothers and nephews were the chambelanes, all dressed as charros, and the damas wore coordinating dresses. It was simple (honest, it was) and gorgeous.

The vals--the formal dance that the kids learn--is closer to a minuet than a waltz. The set figures of the dance are very particular and very special; the kids practice literally for weeks, with a specialized teacher, to learn their steps for this once-in-a-lifetime event. There can be as many as eight to ten chambelanes and an equal number of damas, all strutting their stuff for their parents, godparents, and friends.

Following the vals, there may be a special show put on by the quinceañera and her friends. The trend has been that the kids change into other costumes--circus attire, or jazz dance gear, or something similar--and come out in carefully rehearsed entertainments for everyone in attendance. Following that, there'll be rock'n'roll dancing till the wee hours, or till dawn.

What fun!

#11 ohjoni

ohjoni

    Member

  • Members
  • PipPip
  • 357 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 18 April 2012 - 07:16 PM

I would change one single word: Even Especially families of low economic means make a very big deal about this event, and spend a LOT of money on it.

In Mexico's upper classes, the Mass and party and rituals that LaChula mentioned are being replaced with nightclub parties (yes, even at the tender age of 15), cruises, NY and European vacations, and other things in that price range.

At Lakeside, which is rural Mexico, things are still done in a very 'country' way--not a bad thing at all. The quinceañera's dress may be the fanciest she's ever had, her chambelanes wear tails and cravats color-coordinated with the girl's dress, the damas wear special fancy dresses that are also color-coordinated with the quinceañera's dress, there may be live music followed by or alternating with a DJ, there will be a huge party including a big special meal following the Mass--it's all really a lot of fun. One of the most-fun quinceañeras I attended in Ajijic was (at the honoree's request) done all in charro outfits. The lovely 15-year-old wore a cream-color charro jacket and long skirt with gold braid and a wide cream-color sombrero. Her parents wore black and white with typical green, white, and red floppy charro ties; the mother wore a lovely black silk rebozo. The girl's brothers and nephews were the chambelanes, all dressed as charros, and the damas wore coordinating dresses. It was simple (honest, it was) and gorgeous.

The vals--the formal dance that the kids learn--is closer to a minuet than a waltz. The set figures of the dance are very particular and very special; the kids practice literally for weeks, with a specialized teacher, to learn their steps for this once-in-a-lifetime event. There can be as many as eight to ten chambelanes and an equal number of damas, all strutting their stuff for their parents, godparents, and friends.

Following the vals, there may be a special show put on by the quinceañera and her friends. The trend has been that the kids change into other costumes--circus attire, or jazz dance gear, or something similar--and come out in carefully rehearsed entertainments for everyone in attendance. Following that, there'll be rock'n'roll dancing till the wee hours, or till dawn.

What fun!

Thanks for all the info Liana. I am not much of a party person, but this should be very interesting and colorful. Looking forward to it.
Attitude is Everything

#12 Jeanne B

Jeanne B

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 897 posts
  • Gender:Female

Posted 18 April 2012 - 08:16 PM

I would change one single word: Even Especially families of low economic means make a very big deal about this event, and spend a LOT of money on it.

In Mexico's upper classes, the Mass and party and rituals that LaChula mentioned are being replaced with nightclub parties (yes, even at the tender age of 15), cruises, NY and European vacations, and other things in that price range.

At Lakeside, which is rural Mexico, things are still done in a very 'country' way--not a bad thing at all. The quinceañera's dress may be the fanciest she's ever had, her chambelanes wear tails and cravats color-coordinated with the girl's dress, the damas wear special fancy dresses that are also color-coordinated with the quinceañera's dress, there may be live music followed by or alternating with a DJ, there will be a huge party including a big special meal following the Mass--it's all really a lot of fun. One of the most-fun quinceañeras I attended in Ajijic was (at the honoree's request) done all in charro outfits. The lovely 15-year-old wore a cream-color charro jacket and long skirt with gold braid and a wide cream-color sombrero. Her parents wore black and white with typical green, white, and red floppy charro ties; the mother wore a lovely black silk rebozo. The girl's brothers and nephews were the chambelanes, all dressed as charros, and the damas wore coordinating dresses. It was simple (honest, it was) and gorgeous.

The vals--the formal dance that the kids learn--is closer to a minuet than a waltz. The set figures of the dance are very particular and very special; the kids practice literally for weeks, with a specialized teacher, to learn their steps for this once-in-a-lifetime event. There can be as many as eight to ten chambelanes and an equal number of damas, all strutting their stuff for their parents, godparents, and friends.

Following the vals, there may be a special show put on by the quinceañera and her friends. The trend has been that the kids change into other costumes--circus attire, or jazz dance gear, or something similar--and come out in carefully rehearsed entertainments for everyone in attendance. Following that, there'll be rock'n'roll dancing till the wee hours, or till dawn.

What fun!

More Liana, your post is most informational and I thank you. I have offered to pay for the quinceanera dress for my maid's daughter. I plan on giving her an equivilant of $300 USD ( too much or not enough?). They don't have much money (both parents work but have six children) and I think the party after the mass is going to be in their home in Chapala. Shall I also take a gift? I need more info on this as I have only been to one quinceanera and that was in Sacramento, CA and only as one of three gringa(o)s there and was it ever a surprise to me. Just like a wedding, just minus the groom LOL. You should have seen the cake, wow. Marichai band and a rock band later (that's when we left). Plus some of worse Mexican food I've ever had which was catered. Had a great time and was honored have been invited. Ok, I've said more than enough to bore you, but would your feedback. Thanks, Jeanne

#13 Oatsie

Oatsie

    My other Sombrero is a Shriner's Fez

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 860 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Kinmount Ontario, and Chula Vista in the winter

Posted 19 April 2012 - 05:51 AM

I know that this happens for a 15 yr. old, but is it on or near her actual birthday or some other occasion sometime after the birth day?

#14 More Liana

More Liana

    Advanced Member

  • Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 3,485 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:Mexico City, Mexico
  • Interests:Mexico
    Cultures
    Gastronomy
    Language
    Photography
    The Written Word

Posted 19 April 2012 - 07:22 AM

More Liana, your post is most informational and I thank you. I have offered to pay for the quinceanera dress for my maid's daughter. I plan on giving her an equivilant of $300 USD ( too much or not enough?). They don't have much money (both parents work but have six children) and I think the party after the mass is going to be in their home in Chapala. Shall I also take a gift? I need more info on this as I have only been to one quinceanera and that was in Sacramento, CA and only as one of three gringa(o)s there and was it ever a surprise to me. Just like a wedding, just minus the groom LOL. You should have seen the cake, wow. Marichai band and a rock band later (that's when we left). Plus some of worse Mexican food I've ever had which was catered. Had a great time and was honored have been invited. Ok, I've said more than enough to bore you, but would your feedback. Thanks, Jeanne

Jeanne, if it were me giving the gift of the dress, I'd go shopping with her. Both your employee and her daughter will remember the gift of your time as much or more than they will remember the gift of your money for the dress. $300 will probably be much more than enough, but it's been a long time since I shopped for anything like a dress for a quinceañera. No other gift is required, but it's fun to take a lot of pictures and give her a photo album after the party. Have a wonderful time, and you're right--it will be just like a wedding but without the groom.

And to Oatsie: people generally plan the quinceañera party as close to the actual birthday as possible. Sometimes there is reason to postpone it slightly--for example, if a beloved relative can only come from the States a month later--but it IS, above all else, a birthday party.




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users