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Earthquake?


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#41 Sailor

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 07:26 PM

Interestingly, one of my dogs started scratching at the back door and whimpering a few minutes before this occurred. None of the others acted up and he is fine now. I felt a real rolling motion and everything in the house that could move did.

My kitten started crying just before we felt the quake. Things started shaking and pool water sloshing around. I guess the animals know before we do what is coming.

#42 callejera

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 07:54 PM

As an ex-Californian I knew right away what it was, and ran downstairs to get out of the house to check the pool (sloshing around) and tell my husband to get outside "just in case" - he of course didn't feel a thing and our cats and dog were utterly useless as earthquake predictors. Cats had been on our laps purring contentedly & our dog was fast asleep. We went through the big '89 quake in San Francisco and our kitties sure reacted to that one -- as did we.

#43 natbug

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 08:36 PM

Was skyping with my daughter, we're from CA so didn't react other than, gee an earthquake, and my daughter laughed cuz we were rolling around in our office chairs. Briefly contemplated going outside but it was a roller and nothing much was happening except, well, rolling. lol

#44 ezpz

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:04 PM

Just curious - how well do the brick/boveda buildings hold up in an "average" (not huge) quake? At what point do you get rubble and real destruction? Today's quake felt pretty minor to me, but in the first few seconds you never know!

Impediments to rushing outside the house: Bare feet, or thongs. Front gate/door locked as usual.

A few more tips if you never lived in CA to learn routine earthquake preparedness:

Never hang heavy or fragile items over your bed or anywhere where you might be sleeping. Likewise, no tall shelves or bookcases near the bed or near exit routes.

Always keep your toilet lid down just in case - you don't want to have to fish things out.

In an earthquake prone area you need to do more:

Keep emergency supplies on hand in your house and in your car - you might not be at home when the quake strikes.

Have an emergency contact list with a plan to follow to meet and help eachother.

Put locks on your kitchen and other cabinets where breakable items could fall out.

Keep slip-in shoes by your bed at night. Always sleep in PJs in case you have to run out of the house very quickly.

Bolt down your hot water heater and large, tall furniture items and/or appliances like refrigerators and bookcases.

Reinforce the structure and foundation of your house.

Check out what furniture, like large tables, you could crawl under for protection. Duck and cover. Do not stand in doorways.

Have your most important documents and small valuables in a portable but sturdy container with a handle so you can grab it and run.

What am I forgetting? Hopefully it will never come to this here, ojalla!!

#45 virgogirl

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Posted 11 April 2012 - 09:05 PM

I was in the city in my rooftop apt. and, like Griffin,. thought I was getting a touch of vertigo, or some kind of "spell". The building was swaying. It was a weird sensation. I have never before been in an earthquake. A little unsettling.

#46 Toritrue

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 12:15 AM

Hey Spencer~ Oh yah, Chapala was shaking, I was on the phone when it hit and the person I was speaking with also in Chapala was experiencing swinging chandeliers.

PS, Sent a referral your way today.

Tori

#47 Whitey

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 06:36 AM

In Chapala Haciendas we were sitting in the backyard when I thought my Rotti was behind my chair pushing it. I quickly realized she was in front of me!! Whoa............quite the ride - felt like I was on "majic mountain!". First quake for us............don't really care if it's the last. Quake insurance, might be a good idea Spenser..................we'll talk soon!

#48 Intercasa

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 07:40 AM

One thing taught to us in California which I did here is to strap down my water heater. It was hard to find the metal strapping. An easy thing to do to avoid water and gas leaks if a big one hits.
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#49 More Liana

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Posted 12 April 2012 - 08:33 AM

7.0 at the epicenter in Areaga, Michoacán (not far from Lázaro Cárdenas), 6.4 here in Mexico City. The man was here to bring bottled water and I was dealing with that, so I didn't feel it. Judy was out with the dogs and SHE didn't feel it. But our street was full of people who evacuated the buildings on our block.

This is the fourth earthquake to rock Mexico City--I mean the fourth biggish one--in less than a month, starting with the 7.4+ on March 20. It could stop now, please. We are going to buy a wind chime, then we won't have to be so fixated on the ceiling fan chains. If they sway, it's an earthquake. If they don't, it's a truck going by. That's just how it works at our house, YMMV.

#50 dixonge

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 11:26 AM

We were both sitting down here in Chapala Haciendas. I felt a rush of nausea/vertigo - thought maybe it was because I was sort of hunched over while sitting on the couch. I sat up straight, took a big breath of air. My wife was sitting in the dining room. She says "Why is the house moving?" I jumped up and said "Holy sh*t, it's an earthquake!" and we both moved out to the street and stood behind the car, watching the wrought iron fence and the utility poles gently swaying.

Our first quake, in case you hadn't guessed that already!

#51 PV Kids

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 03:49 PM

Felt nada in Puerto Vallarta.

#52 Jeanne B

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Posted 13 April 2012 - 04:50 PM

Just curious - how well do the brick/boveda buildings hold up in an "average" (not huge) quake? At what point do you get rubble and real destruction? Today's quake felt pretty minor to me, but in the first few seconds you never know!

Impediments to rushing outside the house: Bare feet, or thongs. Front gate/door locked as usual.

A few more tips if you never lived in CA to learn routine earthquake preparedness:

Never hang heavy or fragile items over your bed or anywhere where you might be sleeping. Likewise, no tall shelves or bookcases near the bed or near exit routes.

Always keep your toilet lid down just in case - you don't want to have to fish things out.

In an earthquake prone area you need to do more:

Keep emergency supplies on hand in your house and in your car - you might not be at home when the quake strikes.

Have an emergency contact list with a plan to follow to meet and help eachother.

Put locks on your kitchen and other cabinets where breakable items could fall out.

Keep slip-in shoes by your bed at night. Always sleep in PJs in case you have to run out of the house very quickly.

Bolt down your hot water heater and large, tall furniture items and/or appliances like refrigerators and bookcases.

Reinforce the structure and foundation of your house.

Check out what furniture, like large tables, you could crawl under for protection. Duck and cover. Do not stand in doorways.

Have your most important documents and small valuables in a portable but sturdy container with a handle so you can grab it and run.

What am I forgetting? Hopefully it will never come to this here, ojalla!!

While I agree with most of your suggestions, I have to disagree on the fact of getting under tables, etc. Lay next to the table, bed or whatever. If something crashes onto the table, the table can crush you to the point you cannot move. Instead lay next to it so the table and something heavy falls, the table takes the brunt of the force and protects you. I am from California and we have always heeded this advice. Read this a few years ago.




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