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#1 pera

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 04:35 PM

When we turned on our modem this morning, 7:00 AM everything lit up but the internet, showed wireless connected 54 mpbs but no internet.
Called Telmex at 10:00 AM and reported problem. Just came back on now ie 5:30 PM. Telmex did not come to our home. We live in Villa Nova, wondering was anyone else inconvenienced today?
When you tell the truth, you never have to remember what you said!

#2 mpb

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 04:52 PM

When we turned on our modem this morning, 7:00 AM everything lit up but the internet, showed wireless connected 54 mpbs but no internet.
Called Telmex at 10:00 AM and reported problem. Just came back on now ie 5:30 PM. Telmex did not come to our home. We live in Villa Nova, wondering was anyone else inconvenienced today?


The local company cannot or will not help. You have to call their # at 18001232222, ask for English and eveytime I have called them, they have been very helpful and solved the problem. The first thing they ask you to do is to restart the unit. Many times, that resolves the problem.

#3 cedros

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 05:50 PM

My internet was off all day a few days back. They said it was due to maintenance. They have being doing maintenance in our area for several weeks. Don't expect them to come to your house.

#4 Mainecoons

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 05:55 PM

When we left this morning, we had local service only on TexMex in SE Ajijic. It seems that since we got that notice in our bill telling us how we were going to get an upgrade speed, the thing has been slow, erratic and sometimes not working at all.

Beginning to wish we'd never gotten that notice.

#5 HelperGuy

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Posted 30 June 2011 - 11:49 PM

When we left this morning, we had local service only on TexMex in SE Ajijic. It seems that since we got that notice in our bill telling us how we were going to get an upgrade speed, the thing has been slow, erratic and sometimes not working at all.

Beginning to wish we'd never gotten that notice.

One of our regulars here was posting every so often that their TelMex service was just like yours. I've posted a few times that it's generally not TelMex, but either the modem or the computer, based on seeing hundreds of them around here, and offered to prove it to them. They were absolutely certain that TelMex was the problem, partly because of the spuriousness of their results.

First off, they are paying for the basic service: their posted speeds from speedtest.net actually indicate close to the normal speed for that service (except for the Ping: very slow). Attaching images to email was definitely the biggest problem. Turns out many of the images are 2.5MB or more, and when using a service like Yahoo or HotMail, this can cause time-out problems.

Second, the Vonage phone: the connection to the Vonage box has some physical problems and, along with some strange electrical situation in the house, is pretty poor quality to begin with, even before dialing a number.

I worked on her equipment the other day, and I can report that their installation of Windows XP was so corrupted with age and use that there was no way she would get reliable Internet service. Further, the Huawei modem was overheating so much that it was causing the casing to turn yellow. Repairing Windows helped the speed and certainly helped the Internet Explorer; next step: waiting for them to replace their modem, which will be difficult because while it is causing problems with the 'Net, it does work, and convincing the people at the local office to swap is the problem.

Hooking up my own test modem was the final clincher: spot-on ping, upload and download speeds.

I'll continue to report on this. I hope these results show that perceived TelMex issues are often really not, and that those of you suffering can expect better service, given corrective circumstances.

#6 Mainecoons

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 01:37 AM

Well, the notice said to leave the modem on for them all the time which we did. We did nothing to affect the settings. Sometimes, it has been working just fine. We pay for the 2MB service which the notice indicated was going to be sped up at no charge. We don't have vonage, we have another VoIP service that works just fine.

I figured something went off as a result of that storm Tuesday night. We also lost power for 21 hours, love that CFE. Just didn't have time to run down the problem as we left for Texas very early Thursday morning. Left the modem on so we'll see if it is working when we get back.

#7 HelperGuy

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 08:18 AM

I'd imagine they want it on so they can download the firmware updates when they can, rather than having to deal with individual customers. Perhaps bad timing, considering the number of power outages lately... those AC adapters the modems use are highly susceptible to being zapped.

I haven't been sped up yet, but some of my customers have. There doesn't seem to be any geographical order to the upgrades, but I was told by TelMex support management that upgrades would not require a service call to the house (unless, I guess, someone's modem was off during the upgrade).

Fluctuating "speeds" can be traced fairly easily to determine the source, whether PC, modem or TelMex lines or servers. Unless all around you are having the same problems at the same time, it's a pretty safe bet that it's not TelMex at the source. Of course, it could always be pillar in your neighbourhood having fluctuating power problems, although I haven't seen that yet.

My own service was back to normal after the all-day outage last week, with the exception that their servers somehow managed to block my personal and family IP addresses, so I had no mail or website other than GMail. Fortunately, my provider in the U.S. fixed that for me, because it seemed a losing battle with TelMex. But my speeds are back to where they should be.

#8 Alpha1

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 09:51 AM

Just reported the prob and the report # has been issued.
It was determined to be a server prob not the modem. Can take from 1 to 72 hrs.

#9 Alpha1

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 09:53 AM

Duplicate

#10 jrm30655

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 10:59 AM

Here's the correct sequence to trouble shoot an internet outage per AT&T tech training.

1. Pick up the phone and listen for a dial tone.
A. If no dial tone, line problem requiring a service call.
B. If you have dial tone, line is OK

2. Remove power from router/modem. Wait 20 seconds. Repower the modem/router
A. Lights come on and work up the router. Router OK
B. DSL light does not light. Possible line or router problem.
C. Internet light lights red and won't go green. Probable server problem

3. Start browser (internet explorer etc)
A. In address window type 192.168.1.254 (enter)

NOW< BE CAREFUL!!! Don't go changing things!!!!

Look for either "test internet connection" or "connect" Click on that

It will run a test and try to connect. If "DSL" shows OK and it won't connect, everything on your end is working right.

If it still won't connect at that point, call TELMEX...

#11 bournemouth

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 11:09 AM

Here's the correct sequence to trouble shoot an internet outage per AT&T tech training.

1. Pick up the phone and listen for a dial tone.
A. If no dial tone, line problem requiring a service call.
B. If you have dial tone, line is OK

2. Remove power from router/modem. Wait 20 seconds. Repower the modem/router
A. Lights come on and work up the router. Router OK
B. DSL light does not light. Possible line or router problem.
C. Internet light lights red and won't go green. Probable server problem

3. Start browser (internet explorer etc)
A. In address window type 192.168.1.254 (enter)

NOW< BE CAREFUL!!! Don't go changing things!!!!

Look for either "test internet connection" or "connect" Click on that

It will run a test and try to connect. If "DSL" shows OK and it won't connect, everything on your end is working right.

If it still won't connect at that point, call TELMEX...



Thanks for that helpful post - I've filed it away for future outages.

#12 HelperGuy

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 06:13 PM

Just reported the prob and the report # has been issued.
It was determined to be a server prob not the modem. Can take from 1 to 72 hrs.

That's great, and I've said many times, it can be the fault of TelMex, no doubt about it. But when you've already called the 01-800 number and they haven't been able to help, then your choices are obviously narrowed.

I just would like people to know that often it can be fixed at the home. Many subscribers are not aware of the various problems that can crop up, and just automatically blame TelMex for the service. And that generalized complaint becomes a truism after a while; it's unfortunate, because they get stuck between the proverbial rock and hard place, and continue to suffer with unnecessary slow speeds, not knowing where to turn next.

You let a knowledgeable computer guy look at the problem after you've contacted TelMex and haven't had any luck, and he will tell you how to fix the problem. Worry-lines smoothed.

#13 HelperGuy

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 06:15 PM

Here's the correct sequence to trouble shoot an internet outage per AT&T tech training... If it still won't connect at that point, call TELMEX...

A few steps missing/out of place, but basically correct, and a good procedure for the average user to follow. Will save some heartache.

#14 jrm30655

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Posted 01 July 2011 - 07:41 PM

A few steps missing/out of place, but basically correct, and a good procedure for the average user to follow. Will save some heartache.

I left out all the stuff that you can see from a Telco tech position. You can do a lot of stuff from a tech position board.

DSL is a lousy way to connect to the internet. Fiber optic cable is really the way to go. 100MB downloads and uploads are possible. I saw the other day that they has a 5TB fiber optic working and were expecting 100TB downloads within a year. That's trucking...

DSL speeds are limited by the length of the wire and the condition of the wiring between the router and the server. Every junction causes problems and anything over 1 mile is generally a problem.

TELMEX is upgrading to a "Neighborhood Server System". In the US this is what AT&T is doing to build its "Uverse" system.

On a regular phone system, you bring a multiwire cable to a junction box and then you split out the pairs and run them to the houses in the local area. That multiwire cable can be miles long and it has a splice box every 2 miles or so.

In densely packed areas, you run that multiwire cable to a "drop box" and then run wires from it to each house. You will see these boxes around town. They are about 4' high, 4'wide and about 2' deep.

With the "Neighbor Hood Server" system, you run a fiber optic cable to the drop box location, and set in a small server in a box right beside the drop box. Then you tie the local wiring into that server.

Now, the length of the line from you modem to the server is drastically reduced and you can run much higher speeeds.

In the AT&T system in the US, you can run 24MB on each wire to a house. AT&T throttles the router down to 6MB and that leaves enough bandwidth to run 3 video boxes for TV.

What AT&T doesn't tell you is that there is actually 24MB available and the routers can be increased greater than 6MB. I'm not sure what these routers are capable of, but I suspect that they can run 24MB also.

#15 Floradude

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 08:22 AM

No modem for 24 hours at my house in Upper Ajijic. I did all the usual things. I had decided I would take it back to the Telmex office but
when I got up this morning it was working (Sat).

#16 navyvet

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 08:51 AM

I have uverse in the us, no problems ever but I have 24 megabits not 6 it was as good as cable. Lots more hd channels than the others also. You are right, dsl is an old outdated lousy way to connect.

uverse has 5 speed packages choices, I had the 24. I have 2 tv's running hd channels and still got 24mb. Uverse became available in our area the first of 08 (we got it then) and it was never throttled to 6mb, it started at 14 (max choice) and jumped to 24. :

Up to 3 Mbps, Up to 6 Mbps, Up to 12 Mbps, Up to 18 Mbps, Up to 24 Mbps




I left out all the stuff that you can see from a Telco tech position. You can do a lot of stuff from a tech position board.

DSL is a lousy way to connect to the internet. Fiber optic cable is really the way to go. 100MB downloads and uploads are possible. I saw the other day that they has a 5TB fiber optic working and were expecting 100TB downloads within a year. That's trucking...

DSL speeds are limited by the length of the wire and the condition of the wiring between the router and the server. Every junction causes problems and anything over 1 mile is generally a problem.

TELMEX is upgrading to a "Neighborhood Server System". In the US this is what AT&T is doing to build its "Uverse" system.

On a regular phone system, you bring a multiwire cable to a junction box and then you split out the pairs and run them to the houses in the local area. That multiwire cable can be miles long and it has a splice box every 2 miles or so.

In densely packed areas, you run that multiwire cable to a "drop box" and then run wires from it to each house. You will see these boxes around town. They are about 4' high, 4'wide and about 2' deep.

With the "Neighbor Hood Server" system, you run a fiber optic cable to the drop box location, and set in a small server in a box right beside the drop box. Then you tie the local wiring into that server.

Now, the length of the line from you modem to the server is drastically reduced and you can run much higher speeeds.

In the AT&T system in the US, you can run 24MB on each wire to a house. AT&T throttles the router down to 6MB and that leaves enough bandwidth to run 3 video boxes for TV.

What AT&T doesn't tell you is that there is actually 24MB available and the routers can be increased greater than 6MB. I'm not sure what these routers are capable of, but I suspect that they can run 24MB also.



#17 Alpha1

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Posted 02 July 2011 - 09:23 AM

Just reported the prob and the report # has been issued.
It was determined to be a server prob not the modem. Can take from 1 to 72 hrs.

Still waiting! Standby...




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