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seoulguy

Any recommendations for legal representation?

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The prospect of sending money to, or becoming otherwise involved with, a foreign national I don't know and who isn't located down the street is, of course, unsettling. So, I'm asking for recommendations for attorneys (abogados) or firms who have proven themselves reliable and have followed through at IMS. Is it your understanding that the relationship is understood to be attorney-client, or is this just some sort of administrative paper shuffling exercise where the attorney stands in place of the client, as it were, in line. And, finally, has anyone had experience with Spencer McMullen at ChapalaLaw? What was the outcome?

Edited by seoulguy
Forgot to add sentence

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If you are talking about a closing, I'd ask Eager realty to handle it for a flat fee. They are beyond honest and professional. Spencer has a good rep in the community. 

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If your talking about IMS there are several lawyers/firms lakeside that provide this service for a fee, of course. I guess it comes down to trust of the individual(s) you hire. Same trust you would need to have with a NOB lawyer.

Dealing with IMS can be, for some easy;  for others not so easy.  For the most part it is a paper shuffling exercise but it does involve some running around - hand in your application/paper work to IMS, go to the bank and pay, back to IMS to provide proof of payment, wait, wait, wait, go and get photos, wait, wait, get fingerprinted at IMS, wait, wait, wait some more,  go pick up your status card.  This process can take a couple of months. So unless you are very hands on and check the website regularly for updates. No point getting antsy IMS works at it's own pace. 

Not sure where the 'sending money' piece comes from in conjunction with IMS. You have to be in country to apply at immigration.
 

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Expect not to have the right/all of the paperwork when you visit the IMS. Even when you follow the instructions/advice, sometimes there is something else you need. 

Do expect extra trips for even the smallest of things. Just be happy when you pass each step.

If you are talking about the IMS in Guadalajara, there is a great empanada bakery a half block from the IMS. It helps to make the trip not so bad.

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Be careful where you have your pictures done. A lot of places, especially pharmacies, say that they take IMS photos. But they will not be approved. We learned the hard way. We used a studio near the IMS. Best to ask at the IMS office first.

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Yes, it is INM.  Instituto Nacional Migración is the clue, though not the formal name.

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4 hours ago, seoulguy said:

The prospect of sending money to, or becoming otherwise involved with, a foreign national I don't know and who isn't located down the street is, of course, unsettling. So, I'm asking for recommendations for attorneys (abogados) or firms who have proven themselves reliable and have followed through at IMS. Is it your understanding that the relationship is understood to be attorney-client, or is this just some sort of administrative paper shuffling exercise where the attorney stands in place of the client, as it were, in line. And, finally, has anyone had experience with Spencer McMullen at ChapalaLaw? What was the outcome?

Have you already applied for and received pre approval for residency in Mexico through a Mexican consulate?

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In reply to Mr. Berca, my timeline begins in January, so, no, I have not gathered the docs. I'm still having a problem just getting the Tucson consulate on the phone, and it looks like I'll have to go to Phoenix or Las Vegas. However, I'm not making plans until I have a thorough understanding of the process and feel comfortable that there will be no confounding factors.  I'm aware of the docs required by the consular officials, the financial requirements and attendant costs. I'm looking for legal representation with whom I can feel comfortable discussing issues that may arise in the course of the in-country steps and, correspondingly, comfortable in transmitting funds. I've since learned that ChapalaLaw has something called a "prep" fee, whatever that means. That would be $50.00 + $36.00 out of the gate. So, a regular client-attorney relationship is essential. I appreciate the interest.

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16 minutes ago, seoulguy said:

I'm still having a problem just getting the Tucson consulate on the phone...

If it isn't too far to go, drop by the consulate and make an appointment.

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37 minutes ago, AngusMactavish said:

If it isn't too far to go, drop by the consulate and make an appointment.

Not too far, Angus MacT, consular offices moved from downtown to within a few blocks. It would be more convenient, but the lack of communication is a bad sign. Also, I need to clear up some issues that relate to the in-country step before I'll even collect the docs pursuant to an appointment, and that's why I'm asking for recommendations for lawyers who know all the details.  But thanks; this is the best, most responsive forum around.

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7 hours ago, seoulguy said:

...but the lack of communication is a bad sign.

The sign is your not knowing Mexico and its government employees. To your face they will  be receptive, pleasant, and helpful.

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Mexicans do not generally return phone calls or e-mails.  That is just the way it is.

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Each Consulate have different rules for application for Residente Temporal/Resident Permanente.  No attorney here will know the rules the consulate near you is applying.  Also, as RVGringo said, Mexicans are notorious for not returning phone calls or answering emails.  You must go to the Consulate yourself and speak with them.

Chapala Law can assist you AFTER you are here to complete the process of getting your Visa from INM.  You don't need to send anyone any $ now.

IMHO, Spencer and his team at Chapala Law are the best at dealing with INM whose office is a block away from theirs.  Spencer has been assisting expats with INM for many years.

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Talking about "transmitting funds" makes no sense. You will pay a small preliminary fee at the consulate, then the bulk of the residency visa fee when you are in Mexico, directly to the bank using a paper that INM in Mexico will give you. You then have to go back to their office after paying at the bank to give them the receipt.

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Been in MX 20 years full time, from AZ.  Everyone so far is correct. If you are near Tucson GO TO THE CONSULATE. They will 99.9% of the time not return a call or an email, it seems to be cultural. Also, Phoenix and Vegas, like others have implied, will have different requirements. Spencer can help you once you arrive, or there are many others also. One step at a time...

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I would use Andrea Canon-Preciado as an attorney.  She can be reached through the number 765-4800.   currently it’s a shared line, just ask

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Sometimes it seemed to me that each officer depending on the weather, day of week, time of day, what they had for lunch had their own requirements. hahaha

I am joking. It just seems like that. Take it from someone who's been though it twice. Be patient and have a good book.

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On 10/13/2017 at 2:22 PM, AngusMactavish said:

The sign is your not knowing Mexico and its government employees. To your face they will  be receptive, pleasant, and helpful.

Often, yes. Always, no.

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On 10/14/2017 at 10:04 AM, El Cartero said:

I would use Andrea Canon-Preciado as an attorney.  She can be reached through the number 765-4800.   currently it’s a shared line, just ask

Careful is my comment, she does overcharge, gives a good talk but.......

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On ‎10‎/‎14‎/‎2017 at 8:04 AM, El Cartero said:

I would use Andrea Canon-Preciado as an attorney.  She can be reached through the number 765-4800.   currently it’s a shared line, just ask

Thanks, I assume you mean 011 52 765?

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