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I received this note from yahoo.

If you haven't heard, Yahoo plans to sell its operating business to Verizon. We anticipate the completion of the transaction to occur in June 2017. At the completion, the Yahoo operating business will join the Verizon family of companies, and Yahoo Holdings, Inc. will be offering the Yahoo services you love and enjoy.

 

Will it change anything?

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One can only hope!

I also received that email but I also received a 'note' that my Windows 10 Yahoo Mail app is (now was) going to be discontinued 5/22. 

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Nothing will change for a while. Yahoo recently changed quite a bit of its online layout (again) and annoyed a whole bunch more people (again). Eventually Verizon will see fit to "make it better"...

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19 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

Nothing will change for a while. Yahoo recently changed quite a bit of its online layout (again) and annoyed a whole bunch more people (again). Eventually Verizon will see fit to "make it better"...

Hope so cause I was ready to switch for Google for a while already but, it's a nuisance.

Thanks for your reply.

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Do take note that Yahoo's users are the most-frequently hacked in the world. Yahoo has been telling us for years that it is our fault, our problem. Yet recently they revealed that 2.5 billion users... that's billion... that's 2,500,000,000... were hacked through their own Yahoo servers. Not through our computers. I would drop them faster than a hot potato out of the oven. They lied to everyone and Iam sure they are still lieing, and they haven't released one iota of information to indicate that they know how to stop it.

I've been telling customers this for years and years, to little avail; people seem to want to believe it has to be themselves, that it can't be a big corporation.

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9 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

Do take note that Yahoo's users are the most-frequently hacked in the world. Yahoo has been telling us for years that it is our fault, our problem. Yet recently they revealed that 2.5 billion users... that's billion... that's 2,500,000,000... were hacked through their own Yahoo servers. Not through our computers. I would drop them faster than a hot potato out of the oven. They lied to everyone and Iam sure they are still lieing, and they haven't released one iota of information to indicate that they know how to stop it.

I've been telling customers this for years and years, to little avail; people seem to want to believe it has to be themselves, that it can't be a big corporation.

That particular data breach was (still is) the largest in history, and was followed by another breach of Yahoo the year after affecting a mere 500 million accounts.  In both cases Yahoo waited over two years to publicly admit it.

For a bit of fun, anyone curious enough can check their email address(es) against a database of publicly known breaches at a website called https://haveibeenpwned.com/ , though you may not like what you find.  If nothing else it's a good lesson as to why you never use the same password across multiple sites.

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Yes, that total I wrote about covers the two "known" breaches; first, 2 bil, then another half bil. Makes one wonder about hotmail, because the number of absoncions surely rivals that of Yahoo's. And again, those pilfered passwords simply could not have come from user computers in such great numbers.

Interesting site, Blame the Dog.

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6 hours ago, Blame the Dog said:

That particular data breach was (still is) the largest in history, and was followed by another breach of Yahoo the year after affecting a mere 500 million accounts.  In both cases Yahoo waited over two years to publicly admit it.

For a bit of fun, anyone curious enough can check their email address(es) against a database of publicly known breaches at a website called https://haveibeenpwned.com/ , though you may not like what you find.  If nothing else it's a good lesson as to why you never use the same password across multiple sites.

Interesting website. Thank you for sharing it.

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If you value privacy I would avoid both Google and Yahoo!     Their clients are advertisers and they mine and sell your data to them.   Revenue is not from the users, you are the product.   If you have an Apple device, try their email service, their interests are more aligned with their customers.   You pay a premium upfront for Apple devices but I feel they are worth it with all things considered.   Expecting good security from a free service is an unwarranted leap of faith.   

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Apple and Microsoft data mine and sell their customer information just as much, if not more so, than Google and Yahoo. They have to pay for the free stuff somehow. Apple is a master at it. Just read their user agreements. Apple Mail is just as "free" as everyone else's. Every good business website does the same. It's not a question of who; it's a question of "oh, my!".

Security with Apple is just as good as anyone else's; click here: Hackers claim to have breached hundreds of millions of Apple accounts

(By the way, "data mining" is just a fancy way of saying "extracting information"...)

 

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You forgot to add, after the "extracting information" to add "and then selling it to the highest bidder." After working in technology for more years than I want to admit, I can assure you that Apple is best at one thing-persuading their users and potential buyers that they have a "different" product. Theirs are just as hackable, so you pay the premium for the assurances, the pretty plastic case and the ease with which they roll you through their system. I was charged with many engineering groups in SV and never met one single engineer who used Apple products. There is a reason for that.

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Everyone, be careful: Just got a call from someone who received a similar email, that stressed that because of the Verizon purchase she would have to move to GMail quickly, and transfer all her information, or her Yahoo account would be forever lost. So the scammers are already preying on us.

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36 minutes ago, IMBurnen said:

... "and then selling it to the highest bidder." ....

I suppose that is some good news, I had assumed that they sold to EVERY bidder!

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GMail is still the most secure, by far, of the big names. However, for extra secure email, you can look at protonmail.com, hushmail.com... or do a search for "secure email".

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6 hours ago, ComputerGuy said:

Apple and Microsoft data mine and sell their customer information just as much, if not more so, than Google and Yahoo. They have to pay for the free stuff somehow. Apple is a master at it. Just read their user agreements. Apple Mail is just as "free" as everyone else's. Every good business website does the same. It's not a question of who; it's a question of "oh, my!".

Security with Apple is just as good as anyone else's; click here: Hackers claim to have breached hundreds of millions of Apple accounts

(By the way, "data mining" is just a fancy way of saying "extracting information"...)

 

I respectfully disagree.

Apple makes almost all of it's money from selling hardware, software and services in an integrated package to users.   88% of Google's revenue is from ADVERTISERS not from users.  If I were to guess, apple's revenue is less than 2% from advertising.  Apple's advertising arm exists only to provide income for 3rd party app developers.  Apple does not read your emails, text messages or listen to your phone calls to collect data for advertising like google does.  People pay for Apple's email service when they buy an Apple device or when they pay for greater cloud storage amounts.  As far as advertising privacy goes, Apple is implementing a method called "differential privacy" which adds " hashing, subsampling and noise injection to enable…crowdsourced learning while keeping the data of individual users completely private."  

The amount of malware unleashed on Microsoft and android far surpasses the targeted attacks on Apple.   Old software is at risk, Apple has a greater percentage of up to date devices ( about 84% up to date ), a huge advantage with their vertical integration of hardware and software.    The android user base is severely fragmented on current OS adoption (only about 4% up to date  ) due to a multitude of manufacturers selling different hardware and modified software packages.   The Android user base is fragmented in both hardware and software.

According to a 2016 Nokia threat analysis ( graphic attached below )  Android had 74% of the malware attacks, 22% windows PC systems, less than 4% Apple iOS.   The number of of new vulnerabilities for Apple is growing and it certainly is not immune.   Before 2013 Apple had approximately 0% share of mobile malware.  2015 changed that with most *new* vulnerabilities being on iOS.  However since Apple devices get updated frequently and because there is only one true iOS App Store there are far fewer actual attacks.   Fixes are widely implemented across a homogeneous base faster than across a fragmented base.

Much of new malware is platform independent and embedded in advertising software on the web.   The biggest risk in security is of course human error - clicking on a bad email link, or yielding to a phishing inquiry.  All platforms are susceptible to attack but some are more secure than others.  

Follow the money.   A company like google or Yahoo does not charge it's users - thus they have little loyalty to the users themselves.   Their loyalty lies with it's paying customers, the advertisers.   If the user is not paying, the user is likely the product.

I use some google services, they are good, I just know I have zero privacy when using them.   Like google voice.   Google listens to what is said on both ends of the phone call and then sells that data to advertisers who then serve up adds on other devices that I use.  Google is a totally creepy, I would never trust them with my privacy - no gmail for me. 

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7 hours ago, IMBurnen said:

. I was charged with many engineering groups in SV and never met one single engineer who used Apple products. There is a reason for that.

I do not dispute your personal experience, but it does not reflect enterprise use or my personal experience.  

Apple has iPhones in 99% of enterprise businesses.  Apple has Macs in 91% of enterprise businesses.   I know engineers who use both iPhones and Macs.   I used Macs professionally for decades.  Geeks and engineers however are not a sample of normal people.   Geeks want to jailbreak their phones, program them, and use side loaders to expand their storage.   Most people don't want that, they want an easy elegant solution.  IBM partnered with Apple in 2014 to collectively develop enterprise solutions.  IBM uses JAMF software to manage installations.   Below are some quotes from the JAMF 2017 survey of enterprise users.

"For the increase in Mac and iOS adoption now at 91 and 99 percent, Jamf notes that 74% of organizations saw an increase in Mac adoption and 76% an increase in iPhone and iPad adoption in 2016 versus the year before. IBM has now almost reached its goal of deploying 100,000 Macs, the report confirms, making it the largest company Mac deployment. IBM, which uses Jamf software to manage its deployment, first announced the goal during the JAMF Nation User Conference (JNUC) last October. At the time, IBM said it was saving on average a minimum of $265 per Mac versus a comparable PC due the cost of device itself, OS, support, resale value and deployment."

"Apple’s user-friendly interface often allows users to intuitively solve problems on their own, thus reducing the support needed compared to other operating systems. And when more advanced issues arise, IT admins can trust Apple’s world-class support. Of those surveyed, 63 percent said it’s as easy or easier, in general, to support a Mac than a PC. Additionally, 89 percent of respondents said it’s as easy or easier to support Apple mobile devices over others on different platforms."

https://www.jamf.com/resources/2016-survey-managing-apple-devices-in-the-enterprise/

Apple and Google both have good platforms, they both won the mobile computing era.   Some people dislike Apple products because they charge a premium.   Some people think the Apple premium is worth it ( about 1 billion current Apple iOS users ) and some don't ( about 2 billion current android users with google ).  I consider Apple's profit margin at 20.74% to be quite reasonable.   

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I thought perhaps my comment here was a little harsh, so I reread both your posts. Now I'm convinced it wasn't.

"KoolAid. Swallowed."

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On 5/27/2017 at 0:54 PM, ComputerGuy said:

I thought perhaps my comment here was a little harsh, so I reread both your posts. Now I'm convinced it wasn't.

"KoolAid. Swallowed."

 

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Nokia's most recent threat report.   Less than 4% of mobile malware attacks are on iOS, for the reasons I explained in detail before.

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Again, you miss the point. We are discussing the security (or lack thereof) of email. And none of us are obligated to delineate our reasons for disagreeing with your posts, overlong as they are. My only purpose here is to offer assistance.

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Privacy, security, up to date software and malware are interrelated.  Malware and PUA "potentially unwanted applications" affect device security including email.   Below are links to both Google and Apple's Privacy Policies.   

Apple's Privacy Policy:  https://www.apple.com/privacy/

Google's Privacy Policy:  https://www.google.com/policies/privacy/

 

An excerpt from Apple's Privacy Policy:

"...A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product. But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy.

Our business model is very straightforward: We sell great products. We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don’t “monetize” the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don’t read your email or your messages to get information to market to you. Our software and services are designed to make our devices better. Plain and simple.

One very small part of our business does serve advertisers, and that’s iAd. We built an advertising network because some app developers depend on that business model, and we want to support them as well as a free iTunes Radio service. iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.

Finally, I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will. 

Our commitment to protecting your privacy comes from a deep respect for our customers. We know that your trust doesn’t come easy. That’s why we have and always will work as hard as we can to earn and keep it.    -   Tim Cook, Apple CEO"

 

Share of "Potentially Unwated Applications" by device:

Apple < 0.4%

 

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What do you expect for free?????? You can buy mail services and such where they protect you and look out for your interests but like I said you pay. You should not be doing any business on Yahoo, Google, or Hotmail period. If they want to steal my pictures from the beach on my gmail account fine but I do business on a server I rent space and services on.

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And I agree, but unfortunately that can be a hair-raising experience for many people, in particular if they use an email client.

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