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Kevin K

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About Kevin K

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    http://eatinglocalatlakeside.blogspot.mx
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    kevinmknox

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    Tucson, AZ & San Antonio Tlayacapán

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  1. While I never had problems in the past I have had two major ones in the past couple of months with items sent via USPS International and am looking for alternatives. A box of coffee sent as a gift from a roastery in Atlanta was professionally packaged and shipped and the paperwork filled out correctly but took a month to arrive and when it did arrive all I got was a notice from the Chapala P.O. wanting me to pay duties that were five times the cost of the contents! A second package (tea) shipped by the same method on November 14th never arrived at all and fell off of the tracking radar on arrival in Mexico City on 11/17. So...never again with USPS or Estefeta. I have seen ads for "Extended Roads Package Delivery Service" in the Ojo but don't know them. They apparently bring packages in from McAllen TX to SMA and then use FedEx from there. Anyone know them, or have any other services (DHL? UPS?) to recommend for an occasional lightweight package?
  2. While I never had problems in the past I have had two major ones in the past couple of months with items sent via USPS International and am looking for alternatives. A box of coffee sent as a gift from a roastery in Atlanta was professionally packaged and shipped and the paperwork filled out correctly but took a month to arrive and when it did arrive all I got was a notice from the Chapala P.O. wanting me to pay duties that were five times the cost of the contents! A second package (tea) shipped by the same method on November 14th never arrived at all and fell off of the tracking radar on arrival in Mexico City on 11/17. So...never again with USPS or Estefeta. I have seen ads for "Extended Roads Package Delivery Service" in the Ojo but don't know them. They apparently bring packages in from McAllen TX to SMA and then use FedEx from there. Anyone know them, or have any other services (DHL? UPS?) to recommend for an occasional lightweight package?
  3. Thanks gimpychimp. I'd be happy to help if I can. As it happens, I'm teaching a class on buying and brewing coffee at Lake Chapala the next day (Wednesday the 13th) from 10-12 at LCS. I'll send you a PM traderspoc. Kevin
  4. Thanks for the great info everyone!
  5. Went there yesterday and they don't have them and didn't know what they were (we showed them and suggested that they consider carrying them). Coppel has them online at a great price but when we went into their Chapala store today to order one they said they're not available in Jalisco. So...Home Depot or Costco it is. Kind of amazing that no one at Lakeside is offering them. Anyone know where the electric oil heaters can be found? We bought one at Wal Mart a few weeks ago but they had almost no heaters at all when we visited yesterday.
  6. I'm So Hungry I Could Eat A ..............

    http://mexiconewsdaily.com/news/mexican-horse-meat-a-gourmet-product/
  7. Two Chapala restaurant gems

    I admire your navigational skills (and thank you for your clear directions!) kbleitch - I needed Google maps on my phone to find it. But I agree completely - a really nice spot with lovely hosts. I hope they thrive!
  8. Bulk food store in Chapala.

    The one you're probably thinking of is on Madero, east side, between Flavio Romero and Miguel Martinez. There is also a new one with a somewhat smaller selection that just opened on Juarez near the corner of Lopez Cotilla right across the street from the mercado and next door to two great fruit and vegetable stores.
  9. Two Chapala restaurant gems

    True enough El Saltos but we're so lucky to have the options we do here at Lakeside, with more new places throwing their hats in the ring all the time. Platiequemos Pizza Café is another new entrant here in Chapala. The location is tough (unless you live near Soriana already and know the barrios there) but really nice people and credible thin-crust pizza alla leña. At the risk of hijacking my own thread, those interested in culinary history and the dubious nature of "authentic" anything will enjoy this piece on pizza by the great food historian Rachel Laudan: http://www.rachellaudan.com/2017/10/whats-the-true-history-of-pizza.html
  10. Two Chapala restaurant gems

    I agree with you about M & J. They're great and I hope they thrive. Pizza Disco is also decent but both of these places are more what I would call very good American-style pizzas, with (relatively) thick crusts and an emphasis on many toppings. Delicious but authentic Italian pizza is a different animal: thin crust, cooked at high temperatures in a wood-fired oven, minimalist approach to ingredients (it's all about quality, not quantity). I don't know of anyplace at Lakeside that does Neopolitan pizza flawlessly (and doubt there'd be a market for it anyway given the costs of the special flour, San Marzano tomatoes and mozzarella de buffala) but Barragán's is pretty close on a good day. Nicew to have options - and nicer still not to have to fight Ajijic traffic!
  11. Two Chapala restaurant gems

    For those who live in Chapala (or enjoy visiting from elsewhere) here are two restaurants that deserve far more patronage than they're getting. Casa Barragán is a quite new quasi-Italian place with very nice atmosphere and wood-fired pizzas that are certainly among the best in the area. We enjoyed a pizza margherita last night (110 pesos) that was as close to authentic Neopolitan as you can get in these parts, with a nice thin crust with properly charred edges, real (not sugary sweet) tomato sauce and good cheese. Better than Pizzeria Toscana, their only real local competition in the Italian (as opposed to California or Mexican style) sweepstakes. The address is Paseo Ramon Corona 13 (the main drag that borders the malecon), at the corner of Zaragoza. Pasta and plenty of other Italian specialties too which we haven't tried, but which our discriminating friends rave about. Open 12-10 Saturdays and Sundays, 5-10 MWThF, closed Tuesdays. 765-3558. A couple of doors west is the nice small hotel Toca Madera and its restaurant consists of a small but very competently-run grill that serves a true contender for best burger at Lakeside (the "classico" is close to a half-pound of fresh sirloin on a very high quality bun with cheese, bacon, lettuce, tomato, onions and a small side of good wedge fries for 85 pesos) along with steaks, shrimp and shrimp burgers and a very good mixed grill. Nice outdoor seating under umbrellas, usually tranquil, open for lunch and dinner everyday and never busy except occasionally on weekends at comida time. Breakfasts too. Paseo Ramon Corona 15A, 765-2122.
  12. I'm So Hungry I Could Eat A ..............

    In Mexico it's a mistake, in France (and Italy) it's a delicacy.
  13. F.Y.I. none of the non-smoky mezcals recommended by More Liana are available at Paz. Guess it's time for a trip to Pátzcuaro!
  14. Thank you as always for the education More Liana! I am going to keep the names of the mezcals you mentioned on hand and look for them. As for a trip to Mexico City it is long overdue.
  15. Loz Danzantes is one of several good Oaxacan mezcals you might start with. Here is a good slide show by pioneering single-village mezcal importer Ron Cooper about the process of making the stuff: http://delmaguey.com/process/ I'm going to respectfully disagree with just one item in More Liana's great post above: all mezcal is indeed smoky, though some are much smokier than others. The piñas are invariably buried in the ground right next to a fire, unlike tequila where they are cooked in ovens removed from the fuel source. She is of course absolutely correct that the wide variety of species of mezcals - my favorite being the rare and expensive wild one called tobalá - have so much inherent character that there is a whole lot going on in the glass in a good one besides the smoke - much as a smoky scotch will also have many other aromas and flavors "Higher grade" in her post means "higher % of alcohol" - these are artisanal products that aren't watered down to a standard 80 proof. As for the cremas of mezcal (or Tequila) they're low-alcohol and exceedingly sugary concoctions that are all about disguising the taste of the spirit that's in them. A crema de mezcal tasting will teach you exactly as much about mezcal as a sampling of Irish creams will teach you about whiskey. In Oaxaca I've often observed locals sipping a shot of mezcal (ofter served with a slice of orange, which is magical in its ability to bring out the fruit while blunting the smoke a bit) as an aperitif. It is strong stuff - meant for sipping in small quantities. I don't think it's any less likely to give you a hangover than Tequila, and I still prefer to drink a great blanco Tequila (wood does nothing to improve and much to mask the flavor of any agave distillate!) such as Los Abuelos, Tapatio or Centinela because there's no smoke to interfere with the fruit. Here's a post on Tequila from my local food. blog in case of interest: http://eatinglocalatlakeside.blogspot.mx/2012/06/tequila-beyond-frozen-margaritas-shots.html
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