Hearts at Work

A Column by James Tipton

"The Golden Key"

 

emmet-foxIn the February issue of El Ojo del Lago,I wrote about Emmet Fox’s “The 7 Day Mental Diet”. Since that issue hit the stands, hardly a day has passed without at least one person telling me how important that “mental diet”—created by one of the most influential New Thought teachers of the first half of the 20th century—was to them.

For this issue, then, I decided to revisit Emmet Fox and this time to write about his very popular idea, “The Golden Key.” This concept, Fox assures us, is “the golden key to harmony and happiness” and “it will get yourself or anyone else out of any difficulty.” “…it needs only a fair trial” to prove this claim “is a just one.”

In what Fox calls “scientific prayer,” “it is God who works, and not you, and so your particular limitations or weaknesses are of no account in the process.” Basically, all you need to do is to get yourself out of the way.

Whether you hold religious views or none at all is not important. And “the actual method of working, like all fundamental things, is simplicity itself. All you have to do is this: Stop thinking about the difficulty, whatever it is, and think about God instead. This is the complete rule, and if only you will do this, the trouble, whatever it is, will disappear.” Fox warns us to “not try to form a picture of God, which is impossible. God is present everywhere, has infinite power, and knows everything.”

Here’s what you need to do: “The rule is, to think about God. If you are thinking about your difficulty, you are not thinking about God. To be continually glancing over your shoulder in order to see how matters are progressing is fatal, because it is thinking of the trouble, and you must think of God and nothing else. Your object is to drive the thought of the difficulty out of your consciousness, for a few minutes at least, substituting for it the thought of God. This is the crux of the whole thing. If you can become so absorbed in this consideration of the spiritual world that you forget for a while about the difficulty, you will find that you are safely and comfortably out of your difficulty.”

You can “golden key” a troublesome person or a difficult situation by thinking this: “Now, I am going to “golden key” John, or Mary, or that threatened danger”: then proceed to drive all thought of John, or Mary, or the danger out of your mind, replacing it with the thought of God.” Working this way, you are not seeking to influence or change that person, but it will prevent that person “from injuring or annoying you, and you do him nothing but good. Thereafter, he is certain to be in some degree a better, wiser, and more spiritual person.” Repeat this operation several times a day. “Be sure, however, each time you have done it, that you drop all thought of the matter until next time. This is important.” Do the process then dwell no further upon it. Do not talk to others about what you are doing.

Be quiet, but insistent. Repeat, if you like, a statement that appeals to you, something simple like, “God is with me.” “Do not try to think in advance what the solution to your difficulty will be.” This “will only delay the demonstration. Leave the question of ways and means to God.” You do your part. God will never fail to do his. “The Golden Key” is still in print and it is also available as a free e-book at http://www.tigerseyedowsing.com/ds/other/golden_key.pdf and as a free recording on YouTube narrated by Heather McCauley N?ell at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbK4_yMFIQc.

 

 

 

 

 

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