Anita’s Animals

By Jackie Kellum

Good Manners and Good Sense

 

Anita Aug12I saw the perfect example of this a short time ago. A young Mexican woman was walking her dog in town. Her dog was on a leash.  In addition to the leash and collar, the dog had an ID tag. As she was walking her dog it started to pause to go to the bathroom. She directed her dog off the sidewalk and into the street. After the dog did his business, she picked up the poop in a plastic bag she had with her. And then as she was walking she found and deposited the package into an available garbage receptacle. 

I stopped to thank her for caring for her dog and its safety, and having courtesy for the community. She wondered why the thank you, saying that is what everyone should do. I wish that everyone who walks their dog anywhere off their own property, would have as much wisdom and politeness as this Mexican woman.

On the ‘theme’ of good sense :  Why do people let their dogs roam free or walk off leash  risking their pet  for being hit by a car, injured by a person or another dog, and especially in light of the dog poisoner still at large? Why do ‘responsible’ dog owners not have a collar and ID tags on their dogs? Why do dog owners let their dog ride with their head out the car window so a rock or another object can hit them in the face or eye? Why do people who have pets not make plans in advance  for their pet’s care in the  event that they cannot care for them anymore,  or when [ not if ] they die? As much as I have asked others for answers to these questions and thought about it myself, I have not been able to find a reasonable answer. Maybe someone reading this column can help with the answers.

Many times this column appears to lean towards dogs. So, trying to show no favoritism, this section is about cats. Cats truly are as unique as dogs, in their appearance, behavior and attitude. These are some basic tips to help raise a healthy cat or kitten. Some believe that the mixed – breed cat, similar to our Mexican-mix dogs, have the longevity advantage over ‘pure breeds.’  Providing an appropriate diet for age and activity is important. Keeping the litter box clean is critical. Cats like to be clean, and may use other places other than their box if it is not cleaned on a regular basis. Some cats can develop renal stones due to diet or their own poor mineral metabolism. If your cats starts to not use the litter box despite it being clean or starts to urinate frequently – see your Vet. Having continual easy access to fresh water  is essential.  It is important to do a regular exam of your cat. Look for clear eyes, clean nose, and the mouth and teeth without an odor. Check to see if  your cat is still grooming itself. Examine the skin area for bumps, lumps, injuries, and of course fleas and parasites. If you discover something unusual, have it checked by your Vet, do not hope it will just go away. Have regular Vet checks and keep vaccinations up to date. Obesity in a cat is not a good thing as it creates multiple health problems.  Play with your cat. Cats need exercise like humans, to keep their body fit and their mind stimulated.  Obviously keep your cat safe. Look at the environment from your cat’s viewpoint. Your cat will appreciate your caring. www.anitasanaimals.com  - PayPal available.

 

JACKIE KELLUM

 

Column: Anita’s Animals

 

Website:

 

Born and lived for 24 years in New York City. She became a Registered Nurse and then moved to San Francisco, CA. Her life and nursing career continued there for forty-one years before retiring to Lakeside in 2006. She and her husband live in San Juan Cosala with their eight dogs, and several cats. Shortly after arriving, Jackie began fostering infant motherless kittens and puppies, some as young as a few days old. She volunteers with Anita’s Animals, including the weekly Aijic tianguis, monthly Pet Food Drive, and other charitable events for humans as well as animals.

 

 

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